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oenpelli and olive python info

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neisha018

Not so new Member
Hey I am looking for more info on oenpelli and olive pythons to ensure I am giving out the correct info but I am having a lot of trouble because almost every site has different info and they contradict each other. I was wondering if anybody knew a herp researcher who may have done studies on these two species and produced a document that would be a reliable source of info at all? TIA
 

glebo

Not so new Member
Hi Neisha018, I know a little about Oenpelli pythons and a bit about olive pythons. Im not sure what information you are getting that is contradictory but I may be able to help (although my information may further muddy the waters - lets hope not!).
Regards
Gavin Bedford
 
W

wokka

Guest
The trouble with the net is that anyone can publish so you are bound to get a variety of opinions. Gavin is being a little coy about his knowledge. He has kept and bred Olive pythons for 30 odd years and to my knowledge the only private keeper to keep and possibly breed Oenpellis' legally. I don't think i would be insulting to say he is still leaning about both.
 
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turtle

Well-Known Member
Hi Neisha018, I know a little about Oenpelli pythons and a bit about olive pythons. Im not sure what information you are getting that is contradictory but I may be able to help (although my information may further muddy the waters - lets hope not!).
Regards
Gavin Bedford

Sorry to hijack but just a question Gavin, would it be wiser to introduce Olive potential pairs early in the peace ie get them used to each other 2-3 years earlier? Reason I ask is a friend of mine waited until breeding age 4-5 years, introduced them only to find the the pair violently fighting with the males head in the females. This pair was never paired again. Does it make no difference and if the pair is not compatible it just wont happen?
If you have any answers Gavin , will be greatly appreciated =)
Dan
 

Striker

Active Member
And as long as your answering questions how about an update on the Oenpelli project? It's been a while since I heard anything about how you're progressing, and google doesn't seem to want to help much.

Actually to be fair I probably shouldn't make this request and hijack somebody elses thread. Maybe post an update on a new thread if you have the time?
 
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glebo

Not so new Member
Hi Dan,
over the years I have seen incompatible pairs of many reptiles. They look the goods but when together just dont do well. I have an olive python that I loaned to a really good breeder and he has found to date that his female has no interest in the male and vice-versa. Can this be changed? I think in some instances it can, especially with pythons, but it does involve some manipulation and the smell of another boy. For this I tend to use a recently shed skin from another boy that the original boy has not seen or met before. Some male pythons are not interested because in the past they have been brow beaten (or really beaten) by a rival male and 'remember' the experience. I liken it to the single guys who frequent bars looking for a fight with another male because they are not good at talking to the fairer sex, so they know they don't stand a chance at enticing a lady there but might be able to get some standing among peers (homosexuality is also innate in the animal kingdom, and the fight may be some courting ritual?). This fear or apprehension with the opposite sex appears to happen to some male pythons, olives especially, so it is a matter of retraining for them to believe they can get the girl. Hence the skin from a male they have never met that gets put into the cage with the pair when there has been no activity from either partner after a week or so. I keep skins of other snakes in the Freezer in separate zip lock bags and thaw them out and just lightly mist with water before putting them in the cage as needed. The skin will only be in the cage for a day or so and goes in late in the afternoon as the night time temperature is dropping to hopefully stimulate both a male and female reaction. Separation is also so important in many pythons. You have all heard the adage 'distance makes the heart grow fonder,' so to separate during the feeding months and early cool season and introducing during the breeding season is also very important. Reptiles dont like each other and most will at best tollerate one another, so to keep them together defies their natural instincts - but we do for space constraints. In the wild they live very separate lives and come together in the mating season only - gives some good indicators I think. Hope this helps.
Cheers
Gavin
 

neisha018

Not so new Member
Hi Gavin I was actually just reading an article about your oenpelli quest in scales and tails to try and find someone who atleast has some info on both. I work at a reptile park and I just wanted to know basic info on sizing etc just so that I know I am giving out the right information to guest etc. I personally would love to learn more though on how your oenpelli project is coming along I am also studying zoology and really want to do my own research when I finish so I really like finding out about peoples projects and what they know although I find myself asking so many questions that are yet to be answered at the same time.

Thanks Neisha
 
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