Pics from the Brigalow Belt, Queensland

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by smacdonald, Jan 3, 2008.

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  1. smacdonald

    smacdonald Well-Known Member

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    I headed out to the Brigalow Belt in Queensland to meet some friends of ours and see what cool critters we could find. I've been out to this particular spot a few times, but have never managed to see a De Vis' banded snake (Denisonia devisi), despite this area being well-known for this snake species. So on this trip I was determined to find one.

    The friends that we were with weren't particularly into waiting around while we photographed the critters we saw, so the vast majority of pics below are pretty average.

    The only other things we saw that I didn't manage to get any pics of were a marbled velvet gecko (Oedura marmorata) and a large elapid that slithered off the road and into the grass before we could get close to it. It was large and chunky, so I'm guessing it was a mulga snake (Pseudechis australis).

    I should warn you that I have a bit of an interest in road kill, so there are some pics of squished animals below.

    I've posted this series on a few other forums, so apologies if you've already seen them.

    Stewart

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    Roadkilled De Vis' banded snake (Denisonia devisi). We knew we were in the right place when we found a dead specimen of our target species.

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    Roadkilled mulga snake (Pseudechis australis). This particular area is home to a gorgeous colour form of this impressive snake. This dead one is just a little fellow.

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    Curl snake (Suta suta). This is the only pic we got of this snake before our friends started driving off without us!

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    Australian coral snake (Brachyurophis australis). Photo by Alecia Carter.

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    De Vis' banded snake (Denisonia devisi). At last! The first specimen of our target species! This one looked like it had been run over. We moved it off the road.

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    De Vis' banded snake (Denisonia devisi). We ended up finding four individuals of this species on the last night we were out.

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    Beaked gecko (Rhynchoedura ornata)

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    Fat-tailed gecko (Diplodactylus conspicillatus)

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    Eastern spiny=tailed gecko (Strophurus williamsi)

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    Eastern spiny-tailed gecko (Strophurus williamsi)

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    Box-patterned gecko (Diplodactylus steindachneri)

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    Box-patterned gecko (Diplodactylus steindachneri)

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    Box-patterned gecko (Diplodactylus steindachneri)

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    Eastern stone gecko (Diplodactylus vittatus) that has had its head run over. He was still running along the road. I took this pic while someone else grabbed a rock to put the gecko out of its misery.

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    Brigalow scaly-foot (Paradelma orientalis), a threatened species of legless lizard. The small 'flaps'' either side of the vent are the remains of legs lost over the course of millions of years of evolution.

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    Brigalow scaly-foot (Paradelma orientalis). Photo by Alecia Carter.

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    Juvenile eastern bearded dragon (Pogona barbata)

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    Roadkilled eastern blue-tongued skink (Tiliqua scincoides scincoides). We found four dead blue tongues on the roads. They were all large, and possibly males killed while in search of females. That's Alecia in the background wondering why I'm taking a photo of yet another dead animal.

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    Eastern blue-tongued skink (Tiliqua scincoides scincoides), Photo by Alecia Carter. Thankfully this skink was alive when we found him. He was very angry, obviously not understanding that we just wanted to move him off the road and to safety.

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    Eastern blue-tongued skink (Tiliqua scincoides scincoides), Photo by Alecia Carter.

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    Eastern snapping frog (Cyclorana novaehollandiae), Photo by Alecia Carter.

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    Eastern snapping frog (Cyclorana novaehollandiae), Photo by Alecia Carter.

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    Young eastern snapping frog (Cyclorana novaehollandiae)

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    Young eastern snapping frog (Cyclorana novaehollandiae)

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    Young eastern snapping frog (Cyclorana novaehollandiae)

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    Water-holding frog (Cyclorana platycephala)

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    Water-holding frog (Cyclorana platycephala)

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    Roadkilled hare

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    Roadkilled shingleback (Tiliqua rugosa). This skink was completely eviscerated, probably by crows or birds of prey.

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    Echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus). Not a herp, but probably the closest you can get to a herp while still being a mammal!

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    Sunset through a fence. Photo by Alecia Carter. This is the last sunset we saw out there before heading back home.
     
  2. GraftonChic

    GraftonChic Well-Known Member

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    Very Nice except the road kill pics
     
  3. lil_ben

    lil_ben Active Member

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    awsome pics :D
     
  4. pugsly

    pugsly Suspended Banned

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    Wow..

    Great photography there mate, some supurb shots there including the last one.

    How many nights did you find all these animals over? Seems like a top spot for herping thats for sure, but the roadkill is always depressing.. I have seen a heap of dead lacies on the roads lately.. not good at all...
     
  5. smacdonald

    smacdonald Well-Known Member

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    You were warned!

    Stewart
     
  6. smacdonald

    smacdonald Well-Known Member

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    Hi Steve,

    We had planned on about four nights, but we found four individuals of our target species on the second night so we packed up and went home. The weather was also starting to get very windy on the third day and we weren't sure if our already broken tent would survive. Plus I had a library book to return. There are still species out there I haven't yet seen, so I'll definitely be heading back this season.

    Stewart
     
  7. slacker

    slacker Very Well-Known Member

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    Nice shots, Stew :D

    PS: Where's my flan?
     
  8. python blue

    python blue Well-Known Member

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    nice pics the sun set pic is amazing also the herps are great the de vis banded snake is awsome poor little wood gecko
     
  9. carpetsnake

    carpetsnake Well-Known Member

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    DEEP UNDERGROUND NEAR CABOOLTURE QLD
    what roads did u go on hwy etc
     
  10. smacdonald

    smacdonald Well-Known Member

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    We went on a bunch of sealed roads around Moonie (we were staying at the Moonie Crossroads). I think pretty much any of the roads in that area would yield interesting critters in the right weather.


    Stewart
     
  11. zulu

    zulu Very Well-Known Member

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    A top post stewart very entertaining,great photography love that last shot,in respect to the gecko with the flattened head you could of reinflated its head by mouth to mouth or bike pump,got to look on the bright side,he wont stray on the road again.:):):)
     
  12. smacdonald

    smacdonald Well-Known Member

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    I tried, but I couldn't actually find its mouth. :(


    Stewart
     
  13. warren63

    warren63 Very Well-Known Member

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    Great pics and just goes to show how our roads and herps dont mix
     
  14. zulu

    zulu Very Well-Known Member

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    That last pic is very australian,ime looking into the beautiful sunset and spot the wings not of an eagle! haha its a fly right in the middle perched on the wire,thats wicked,howd she train him to sit still? ;)hope the fly was unharmed in the making of the picture.:):)
     
  15. smacdonald

    smacdonald Well-Known Member

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    I've Photoshopped out the tiny little chains that are holding the fly down.

    Stewart
     
  16. zulu

    zulu Very Well-Known Member

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    re Pics

     
  17. rexs1

    rexs1 Well-Known Member

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    Beautiful pics. It certainly is a great location in S.W. Qld. The frog pics are terrific.
     
  18. Joshua VW

    Joshua VW Well-Known Member

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    Great pictures!
    I really like the frog photos and that last picture is amazing.
     
  19. Joshua VW

    Joshua VW Well-Known Member

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    You should send the last picture into National Geographics.
     
  20. Jonno from ERD

    Jonno from ERD Very Well-Known Member

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    Nice post, Stewart!

    I herp the Brigalow fairly often. In April this year we were moving a Snakeneck Turtle off the road, and there was a De Vis swimming across a dam, in the middle of the day. It was an underweight adult female. We find them fairly regularly out there, but not often during the day.

    The species I have found are -

    Acanthophis antarcticus
    Demansia psammophis
    Denisonia devisi
    Furina diadema
    Hemiaspis damelii
    Hoplocephalus bitorquatus
    Parasuta dwyeri
    Pseudechis australis
    Pseudechis guttatus
    Pseudechis porphyriachus
    Pseudonaja textilis (speckled form, very nice)
    Suta suta
    Vermicella annulata

    Varanus gouldii gouldii
    Varanus panoptes rubidus
    Varanus tristis
    Varanus varius

    Chelodina expansa
    Chelodina longicollis

    Diplodactylus steindachneri
    Diplodactylus tesselatus
    Diplodactylus vittatus
    Gehyra dubia
    Heteronotia binoei (over and over and over again...)
    Oedura marmorata
    Oedura monilis
    Oedura robusta
    Ryncoedura ornata
    Strophurus taenicauda
    Strophurus williamsi (found one in a bathtub in the middle of St George!)

    Delma plebiae
    Delma tincta
    Lialis burtonis
    Pygopus schraderi

    Anomalopus leuckartii
    Ctenotus robustus
    Egernia rugosa
    Egernia striolata
    Eremiascincus fasiolatus
    Eremiascincus richardsonii
    Lerisa punctatovittata
    Morethia boulengeri
    Tiliqua rugosa aspera
    Tiliqua scincoides scincoides

    Amphibolurus burnsi
    Ambhibolurus nobbi
    Pogona barbata


    As you can tell, we normally only herp at night. Have you ever seen Morelia or Antaresia out there? I would be very interested to see some photos if you have.

    Cheers
     
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