Pilbara herping trip jan 2012

Discussion in 'Field Herping and Reptile Studies' started by luzek, Jan 21, 2012.

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  1. luzek

    luzek New Member

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    A colleague and I recently got back from a herping trip through the Pilbara ranges. We were hoping to travel further north to the port headland area to try our luck for some Womas and Black headeds but unfortunately we were hit by the full force of mother nature. When it rains up there it seriously rains! On one day it rained for 13 hours straight, transforming the dry, sun scorched landscape to a series of lakes for as far as the eye could see. Due to the very real chance of being hit by a cyclone we decided to cut our losses and head home after four nights. Frustratingly we had some problems with the photography due to our lenses constantly fogging up on some nights due to the humidity. Anyway here's the pick of the bunch hope you enjoy!




    V. panoptes.jpg
    Varanus panoptes Cue area

    C. amphiboluroides.jpg
    Caimanopes amphiboluroides
    we found several gravid females sunning themselves north of Paynes Find.

    C. nuchalis.jpg
    Ctenophorus nuchalis Mt Magnet area

    termite mound.jpg Spinifex (Triodia sp.).jpg
    Spinifex habitat near Hamersley gorge

    P. alecto.jpg
    P. alecto 2.jpg
    Fruit Bats Pteropus alecto roosting in trees at the base of a gorge

    fig tree.jpg
    fig tree near fern pool Karijini national park

    DSC_0069.jpg
    Hamersley Gorge

    DSC_0079.jpg

    DSC_0154.jpg

    C. caudicintus.jpg DSC_0254.jpg
    Ctenophorus caudicinctus this species was abundant right throughout the ranges and rocky areas.

    A longirostris.jpg
    Amphibolurus longirostris

    A. stimsoni.jpg DSC_0312.jpg
    Antaresia stimsoni

    A. wellsi .jpg A. wellsi 1.jpg
    Acanthophis wellsi these animals are truly impressive, this snake though was certainly not the most impressive example of A. wellsi we sighted. I personally like much darker bands in them and we found some that had perfectly black contrasting bands, however none of these were photographed due to camera issues.

    F. ornata.jpg
    furina ornata

    D. conspicillatus.jpg
    Diplodactylus conspicillatus

    L. stenodactylum.jpg
    Lucasium stenodactylum

    O. marmorata.jpg
    Oedura marmorata interesting pilbara colour form.

    N. wheeleri cintus.jpg
    N. wheeleri cintus 2.jpg
    Nephrurus wheeleri cinctus. Easily my favourite species in the genus. interestingly we found several males with re-gen tails. This species was very common on overcast nights especially when the humidity reached 80% or higher.

    S. wellingtonae 1.jpg S. wellingtonae.jpg
    Strophurus wellingtonae

    S. jeanae.jpg
    Strophurus jeanae

    DSC_0260.jpg
    Ctenotus saxatilis

    DSC_0227.jpg
    Carlia munda

    DSC_0279.jpg
    Eremiascincus fasciolatus

    DSC_0263.jpg
    Egernia formosa

    Total species list:

    Frogs:
    Cyclorana maini
    Litoria rubella

    Geckoes:
    Diplodactylus conspicillatus
    Lucasium stenodactylum
    Gehyra pilbara
    Gehyra variegata
    Heteronotia binoei
    Nephrurus wheeleri cinctus
    Oedura Marmorata
    Rhynchoedura ornata
    Strophurus jeanae
    Strophurus wellingtonae

    Skinks:
    Carlia munda
    Cryptoblepharus ustulatus
    Ctenotus saxatilis
    Egernia formosa
    Eremiascincus fasciolatus

    Dragons:
    Amphibolurus longirostris
    Caimanops amphiboluroides
    Ctenophorus caudicinctus
    Ctenophorus isolepis isolepis
    Ctenophorus nuchalis
    Pogona minor (minor/mitchelli)

    Monitors:
    Varanus gouldii
    Varanus panoptes

    Legless lizard:
    Lialis burtonis

    Snakes:
    Acanthophis wellsi
    Antaresia perthensis
    Antaresia stimsoni
    Furina ornata
    Pseudechis australis
    Pseudonaja mengdeni

    Other:
    Ardeotis australis
    Pteropus alecto
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2012
  2. GeckPhotographer

    GeckPhotographer Very Well-Known Member

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    Nice pictures I like the wheels, jaenae and caimonops best in that order.
     
  3. richoman_3

    richoman_3 Very Well-Known Member

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    stunning photos and finds !
     
  4. moloch05

    moloch05 Well-Known Member

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    Nice collection of photos, Luzek. I really like the shot of Caimanopes amphiboluroides. Hope to see one of those someday.

    Regards,
    David
     
  5. luzek

    luzek New Member

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    Hi david, caimanops amphiboluroides is new to me. This species was quite prevalent in the densely vegetated Mulga woodlands just north of Paynes Find. We must have come at a good time, because every female we sighted was gravid.

    regards,
    Jack
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2012
  6. edstar

    edstar Well-Known Member

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    Great finds mate
     
  7. mmafan555

    mmafan555 Well-Known Member

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    Where were the death adders seen at? And are the common in that area?
     
  8. Niall

    Niall Well-Known Member

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  9. luzek

    luzek New Member

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    Within there habitat i would say they are quite common. conditions permitting e.g a good moon phase and good humidity (80%+). It would be reasonably probable to find several animals in a night.

    Cheers Niall,

    How funny! We would have almost certainly crossed paths! Your photos of wellsi are great! awesome specimens..Did you have any luck with wheeleri around the Panawonica area? It seems we both got dealt a very average moon phase. My mate and i were actually quite lucky on a few nights where the cloud cover was so dense that it completely covered the moon all together. The conditions where we were got so bad in the end that it just would have been a total waste of time continuing any further north, which was a shame and a disappointment as i would have loved to photograph some BHP's and Womas.

    Cheers,
    Jack
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2012
  10. Niall

    Niall Well-Known Member

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    Didn't find one wheeleri around panawonica area, it was one of the species to find a photograph.
    Always got next time ;)
     
  11. luzek

    luzek New Member

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    thats it mate theres always next time. p.s whats the trick with posting photos on the pilbara pythons forum? i tried with no success. :(
     
  12. ssssmithy

    ssssmithy Well-Known Member

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    nice pics mate. love the Wheeleri

    smithy.
     
  13. Niall

    Niall Well-Known Member

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    Attachments have got to be lower then 180KB per post.
    I just use photobucket, just post the URLs up.
     
  14. luzek

    luzek New Member

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    yeah it was quite odd, i compressed my jpegs to well under 180KB. still no luck :(
     
  15. mmafan555

    mmafan555 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the reply...Just out of curiosity if I do eventually get to Australia and went herping and I went to the Pilbara...where would be the best place to go look for these Pilbara Death Adders? Would Exmouth be a good place to start out at?
     
  16. hazza88

    hazza88 Not so new Member

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    You was probably around pannawonica area when i was busy working out on the mine doing night shift did you get a chance to see any of the big olive pythons around pannawonica and fortescue river?
     
  17. Niall

    Niall Well-Known Member

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    I was sure looking out for some.
    Ended up going to most areas that I know where Olives are found and have been seen, but all we got was massive craps and skin.
     
  18. hazza88

    hazza88 Not so new Member

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    on your way into pannawonica on your left hand side before the turn off to the mine site theres a a sewage farm there and a big 4m resident olive lives there got some good photos ill upload when i can be bothered. We always get them coming onto the hall road at work and we relocated on from the beer garden in town. Too bad you didnt see any theres been heaps out lately
     
  19. jamesjr

    jamesjr Well-Known Member

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    Please upload:D, very keen to see some barroni pics.
     
  20. luzek

    luzek New Member

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    Hi mmafan555,

    I have found
    wellsi right through the exmouth area but they are typically less impressive than the animals found further north east. This is probably for a few reasons and one being that it is a possible hybrid zone with A. pyrrhus. this would explain the lighter banding.
     
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