Ramphotyphlops ID confirmation.

Discussion in 'Field Herping and Reptile Studies' started by GeckPhotographer, Feb 5, 2012.

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  1. GeckPhotographer

    GeckPhotographer Very Well-Known Member

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    This blindsnake was from near Pilliga, in NSW. Midbody scale count is 20+-1 in case I stuffed up and missed a scale etc. I've included a picture of the snout which I do not find to appear trilobed, however I have little experience with blindsnake snouts. I'm currently looking at the most likely ID to be R.proximus (which I've labelled it as for now) but would like someone else to agree that a "bluntly trilobed" snout looks like this to be sure.

    Alternatively if someone has good experience with blindsnakes in that area and says this absolutely screams R.ligatus I would be happy to accept I had made a large mistake counting midbody scale rows.


    Cheers.




    IMG_4741.jpg

    [​IMG]Ramphotyphlops proximus by Stephen Mahony, on Flickr
     
  2. JrFear

    JrFear Very Well-Known Member

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    im gonna go with earth worm! lol
    sorry mate no idea!!
     
  3. GeckPhotographer

    GeckPhotographer Very Well-Known Member

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    I should mention that if anyone wants closer pics of the snout in profile I have some.
     
  4. eipper

    eipper Very Well-Known Member APS Veteran

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    Can you post the profile pick and one showing the tail
     
  5. SteveNT

    SteveNT Very Well-Known Member

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    There is a pale yellow and grey banded one that's not on the books yet. I first came across it in an old cypress pine stump (6 of them) in Kakadu in the early 80's. Found one (1) twenty years later in the Arnhem escarpment south of Maningridaalso in a cypress stump. (cypress is the best mozzie repelant for your fire which is why a pull a few old stumps up :))
     
  6. waruikazi

    waruikazi Legendary

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    What is cypress?
     
  7. GeckPhotographer

    GeckPhotographer Very Well-Known Member

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    I'm afraid I do not have a picture of the tail, it did have a spine on the tail tip if that is what you wished to see.

    IMG_4744 profile.jpg
     
  8. SteveNT

    SteveNT Very Well-Known Member

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    Callitris intratropica. Cypress pine.

    Used to be very widespread across the Top End. There was a huge industry logging it 1900-1930's. But a big one takes 300 years to grow. No insect will touch it. I have fossil cypress from 120 million years ago and same deal, absolute 0 insect damage.

    Suffers in hot fires though. Restricted to grass free zones these days.

    I love the smell of the burning wood, and moz and mij hate it! It also burns with beautiful green and blue flames!
     
  9. eipper

    eipper Very Well-Known Member APS Veteran

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    The scent glands in proximus are visible on the lateral aspect of the tail.

    It certainly looks similar to proximus but the head profile seems a little off. I will check a few of my images later tomorrow.

    Cheers
    scott
     
  10. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    From what I can see of the scales on the head I would go with R. proximus. The head from above looks like it was taken slightly forward of the snake. As a result the weak trilobed shape does not show up. However, you can see it in the side profile, where the rostral is slightly in front of the nasal scales.

    Blue
     
  11. waruikazi

    waruikazi Legendary

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    Any pictures Steve? There's some healthy cypress forests along the Maningrida rd after 3ways, i'll head out and find one. Then you can describe it, you could call it R. steveNTi.
     
  12. GeckPhotographer

    GeckPhotographer Very Well-Known Member

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    It was me belief that the rules governing the naming of species didn't allow the author of a paper describing a new species to name that species after themselves.
     
  13. Jonno from ERD

    Jonno from ERD Very Well-Known Member

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    You're right - that's why you name them after your dog or daughter.
     
  14. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    I think we all know a certain someone who has not stuck to that rule...

    Blue
     
  15. Klaery

    Klaery Well-Known Member

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    Not a rule. It is just considered a really selfish/tool thing to do. People have done it but they are laughed at. The name is usually to honour someone (like your supervisor or the original finder if Steve was to pass some on to a taxonomist).
     
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