Red Light question

Discussion in 'DIY Zone' started by SteveNT, Dec 14, 2012.

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  1. SteveNT

    SteveNT Very Well-Known Member

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    I just got a red LED light for the tarantula because they dont see the red part of the spectrum. I know this is true with many fish also.

    Can anyone tell me if this applies to reptiles (or types of reptiles) or not.

    thanx
    Steve
     
  2. phatty

    phatty Well-Known Member

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    I am using red led for some snake at might they don't seen to be bothered by them still come out at night
     
  3. SteveNT

    SteveNT Very Well-Known Member

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    I have a heavily planted tank for my File Snake with strong blue and white LEDs for plant growth. He still comes out with the lights on but obviously more so when it's darker. I was thinking of adding a red LED bar if it wont bother him, hence the question.
     
  4. phatty

    phatty Well-Known Member

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    I got a few mtrs of red strip if you wanna.try
     
  5. SteveNT

    SteveNT Very Well-Known Member

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    thanks for the offer cobber, I still want to find out if they see in the red spectrum first cheers :)
     
  6. jahan

    jahan Active Member

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    Steve, I think the red light attracts the male homosapiens.:lol:
     
  7. mungus

    mungus Very Well-Known Member

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    Deleted: Off Topic
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 17, 2012
  8. SteveNT

    SteveNT Very Well-Known Member

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    Ha ha all. Anyone know? I thought it might be a common knowledge thing, ah well Google it is.
     
  9. Stuart

    Stuart Site Admin Staff Member

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    Spent a bit of time on google for you this evening :)
    Seems the common denominator is the darker the light (lower light spectrum), the less your snakes/arachnids are affected. The variable in this is if you use an infrared light which also gives out heat.

    Just my findings, but its from the Internet, it's likely to have differing opinions somewhere
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2012
  10. SteveNT

    SteveNT Very Well-Known Member

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    Thanks mate, I'm talking red LED light not Infrared, We're leaving for a trip to SA/ Vic tomorrow to see the families. (watch for the Mexico post). I'll find out.

    Meanwhile Suzan the Tarantula is splendidly unaware I am watching her patrol the tank and smash crickets in red light. I am glad that insects/ arachnids never solved the lung problem with scale. I would hate to meet even a 1 meter ant let alone a 2 meter spider (except from a distance :)
     
  11. buffcoat

    buffcoat Well-Known Member

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    I use red heat bulbs in all my tanks. My JCP comes out of her hide every night at the same time to perch. My corn has had a red bulb for 4 years now. With my hognose they are active during the day then head under their bedding when nightfall comes.

    Just in my observation I would say red does not bother them. Nor does blue or even dark green.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 2
     
  12. CaptainRatbag

    CaptainRatbag Very Well-Known Member

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    I know pythons cant see IR light, and alot of people use red party bulbs, as far as I know, they cant see that either. The best way to find out is to put a red led in with your snake at night with no other light and see if its pupils are full round (cant see it) or slits (can see it)

    Bluetoung knows all about reptiles and the light spectrum.... once he sees this thread he will fill you in for sure :)
     
  13. jedi_339

    jedi_339 Well-Known Member

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    On a similar tangent you could wait until the file snake is active in the dark and then turn on a red light and watch for changes in behaviors, whether she/he stops or continues along as if it isn't noticed.

    I'd heard a little while ago that LED lights might not be overly healthy for animals eyes. Has anyone heard this before? If so is it any leds? Or only high power ones in spotlights and head torches?
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2012
  14. Zanks

    Zanks Active Member

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    If not please reveiw the thread he started on the subject here.
    Sorry about this SteveNT as this covers infrared and not visible.
    I would wait to see what Bluetonge1 says in regards to red light being visible to reptiles.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 17, 2012
  15. Hey Steve, some snake species have photoreceptor pigments that can detect long wavelength light. However I doubt any studies would have been done on file snakes and as they differ from most typical species that are studied I doubt anyone will be able to give you a definitive answer. In saying that I highly doubt a dull red light will have any negative impact on the snakes or there behaviour.
     
  16. Zanks

    Zanks Active Member

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    Some infomation about reptile vision found here

    (Removed link as it broke rule regarding unautherised advertising)
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2012
  17. Stuart

    Stuart Site Admin Staff Member

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    Guys, bear in mind Steve is talking about the visible light spectrum (red led lights) and not the infrared spectrum. technically you are all correct depending on what you base you post on ;)
     
  18. Ramsayi

    Ramsayi Very Well-Known Member APS Veteran

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    Snakes can see red light as well as blue.
    Source: observation over the years.
     
  19. J-A-X

    J-A-X Very Well-Known Member

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    The few times I've run red lamps (both red colored globes and infra red) it was like I had a bi-polar python , she didn't like them and was like she was always on edge
     
  20. phatty

    phatty Well-Known Member

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    well check mine with the lights on and they have round eye not slits and that is at full power when i dimm them they do not have any reaction in there eyes
    also at night there is always still some light so if you had some white led but only like 3 then i dont think it will effect them i wouldn't be putting in 500mm of strip thou unless u have a dimmer
     
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