Rescued frog eggs help!

Discussion in 'Other Australian Reptiles and Amphibians' started by bluedragon, Oct 5, 2017.

  1. bluedragon

    bluedragon Active Member

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    hi all i have just found a clutch or what ever you call it not realy a amphibian keeper but i probably rescued giant green tree frog eggs from millions of cane toad tadpoles and the eggs were round jelly with the brown dot in the center and about 50 eggs or less than that and they have just hatched today and there very tiny orangey brown tadpoles. and was just wondering if any one can give me advice to raise these guys to frogs never kept frogs before so hope to hear your answers

    sorry i dont have any photos there to small for the the camera to pick them up
     
  2. danyjv

    danyjv Active Member

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    I remember as a kid all ways having tadpoles as pets . I used to give them lettuce to eat . Hope that helps a bit


    Iceberg lettuce


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  3. bluedragon

    bluedragon Active Member

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    thanks i new that i put the lettuce in the tank but they ar very small no bigger than 2mm
     
  4. Buggster

    Buggster Active Member

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    I’m pretty sure it’s illegal to remove frog spawn/tadpoles from the wild.
    In any case, there is NO WAY these individuals will be able to be released into the wild.

    From what I know, Giant Green Trees start breeding in the Nov-Feb period, so it’s way to early for eggs to start hatching out.

    You clearly don’t really know how to care for these guys and what you’re doing. Contact a wildlife rescue group and hand them over
     
  5. Prof_Moreliarty

    Prof_Moreliarty Subscriber Subscriber

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    just a thought but what if they were cane toad eggs..
     
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  6. Iguana

    Iguana Well-Known Member

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    I personally would've just taken them to another pond/stream nearby, away from the cane toad spawn.
    As buggstar said a wildlife rescue group should be able to take them, you're lucky because there are loads of them in QLD and there should be plenty who specialize in reptiles/amphibians.
    I don't know too much about tadpoles personally, but I would be trying to keep the water warmish and clean until you can give them to a wildlife rescue/rehab group.
    They could probably also tell you what species...
     
  7. Buggster

    Buggster Active Member

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    cane toad spawn and tadpoles are pretty much solid black. and the eggs are put together in a chain-like formation instead of a large clump, so they are pretty distinctive.

    [​IMG]
    google image of cane toad eggs (note the chains formed by the eggs) and the solid black of each stage
     
  8. bluedragon

    bluedragon Active Member

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    buggster there were lots of chains in every puddle and pond there were was so much couldn't see my feet and the water was crystal clear
     
  9. kankryb

    kankryb Active Member

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    Use fishfood, that dry flake stuf
    We use that for tadpoles here in dk
     
  10. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Well-Known Member

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    Should kill all the cane toads and eggs while you are there nothing but a pest (wild ones, idk if u can have them as a pet, why would you)
     
  11. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 APS Veteran APS Veteran

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    'Frog eggs' are called spawn (rescued from amongst Cane Toad's spawn [& taddys])

    I’ve raised hundreds of tadpoles to froglets feeding nothing but the green outer leaves of iceberg lettuce - the ones they throw out in the supermarket. Simply tear the leaves into several smaller pieces, discarding any light green leaf or white bits from the bottom and midrib. Place in boiling water for 5 mins or so, strain and cool. Pack the par-boiled leaves into an ice-cube tray and freeze to make lettuce ice blocks. Then when your tadpoles run low on food, simply add another lettuce ice block.

    Mine were raised in black plastic recycling crates in the backyard. They don’t seem to need direct sun but most of mine did get a few hours each morning. It is important not to let the water temperature get too hot. Do a 30% water change as required, when the water starts to get mucky. For example, with a crate of several dozen advanced tadpoles, I would do a water change once a week. You should leave some of the detritus formed as they naturally ingest this as well.
     
  12. bluedragon

    bluedragon Active Member

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    yea was to late all the toad spawn hatched an the water is just black

    thanks bluetongue1 will try that

    i think they might be eastern dwarf green tree frog eggs as we have alot up here
     
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  13. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 APS Veteran APS Veteran

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    bluedragon, it doesn’t sound like Eastern Dwarf Tree Frogs L. fallax as they lay their eggs in smaller bundles - max of 35 from what I have read, but usually a lot fewer in my experience. As well, they attach them to stems of emergent vegetation rather than free floating.
    Do you need to know anything about dechlorinating water?

    Buggster, they have different rules in Queensland. You are allowed to collect and keep up to 8 frogs “of least concern” species, no more than 2 of one species, from your own property, without a licence. Any tadpoles produced are to be released back where the adults came from within 7 days of morphing (assuming they are healthy). There is nothing specific about tadpoles in the legislation other than it is not illegal and does not require a license for an individual to rear local tadpole species on their own property but schools have to apply for an authorisation. While rescuing frog spawn is a ‘grey area’. I reckon if it gives local frogs a chance to develop beyond tadpoles (without the competition of cane toads) then that’s a good thing.
     
  14. bluedragon

    bluedragon Active Member

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    they are brown tree frogs
     
  15. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 APS Veteran APS Veteran

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    Rather than providing the requested details on the nature of the spawn, you posted a pic of similar looking spawn (actually from monsoonal north Qld). That makes it more difficult to provide an ID. So I am going to assume the egg mass you retrieved was unattached and submerged. Two possible candidates (for that area) are Litoria caerulea and Litoria latopalmata.

    Green Tree Frog tadpoles are fairly large and range from dusky brown, olive brown to translucent gold-brown in colour depending on the habitat. Broad-palmed Frog tadpoles are sandy gold.
    upload_2017-10-28_2-20-36.png
    Litoria latopalmata spawn

    upload_2017-10-28_2-22-11.png
    Litoria caerulea spawn

    The common name “Brown Tree Frog” normally refers to Litoria ewingii, also referred to as the Southern Brown Tree.
     
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  16. bluedragon

    bluedragon Active Member

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    this what they look like this
    Frog_eggs_3.jpg
     
  17. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 APS Veteran APS Veteran

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    I think you missed the point a bit. As a generalisation, more is known about spawn for various frog species than is known about the tadpoles. One can identify and locate mating adults from their calls and observe the spawn produced. Observations on this spawn can continue up until it hatches because it doesn’t swim off. Some species lay in moving water, other still water, some in deep water, others in shallow water, some in ephemeral puddles, others in permanent pools. Some lay attached eggs, others fee floating, some use floating bubble nest clumps, while some lay in submerged clusters, some lay floating clusters on the surface which then spread out and sink and...

    The characteristics of the egg mass can therefore be used in narrowing down the potential species, along with geographic location. Now do you understand why I wanted you to confirm if the eggs you rescued were floating or sunken, whether they were attached or free, and whether they were several layers thick or pretty much in a single layer? Unfortunately the term “like” does not fully confirm these specific details.
     
  18. bluedragon

    bluedragon Active Member

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    they were flatting single layer and was broken in to sinle eggs
     
  19. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 APS Veteran APS Veteran

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    Again, I assume they were sunken. Given the information now provided and the photos of the tadpoles on the ID thread, I’d say that they are likely Green Tree Frogs (L. caerulea).

    At the same time, there is nothing to guarantee that they are all of the one species. See if you can pick out any significant difference in the colour of some tadpoles.

    Happy rearing!
     
  20. bluedragon

    bluedragon Active Member

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    but if there not and there a small breed of frog what would i feed them
     

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