Salt Water Bath.

Discussion in 'Herp Help' started by Cypher69, Jun 7, 2013.

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  1. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    If the instructions were to use 2% saline solution then that is what is required.

    The sterile saline available from the chemist is, as you say, 0.9% which is the same as human blood. It is also called ‘normal’, ‘isotonic’ or ‘physiological’ saline. Used on contact lens to clean and moisten them, it does not hurt the eyes when brought into contact. Having the same osmotic balance as body fluid there is no movement of water or solutes in or out of the eye.

    A stronger salt solution is used to help disinfect by either drawing water out of pathogen cells by allowing salt ions to pass into it or both. I don’t know which happens with fungal hyphae but I have not got time to look it up.

    Sea water as an average strength of 3.5% and I sure you would be aware of the effect on your eyes.

    Table salt is usually pure NaCl and it states if iodine is added. Both rock salt and sea salt are likely to have traces of other minerals, depending on how it is extracted. Irrespective, they are all prepared forhuman consumption and added to a huge number of food products as a flavour enhancer. I don’t think it would particularly hurt the frog ifit drank some 2% saline. It will excrete any unneeded electrolytes as per normal. It copes with the electrolytes in tap water, once the chlorine and chloroamines are removed.

    A 2% salt solution can be made by adding 20g of NaCl (= 3.6 level teaspoons) to one litre of water. It does not have to be super accurate to be effective.

    Blue

    My apologies - I was in a rush. The original solution strength needed was actually 2.5%. That would require 4.5 level teaspoons of salt.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 9, 2013
  2. KristenJ

    KristenJ Not so new Member

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    I found this online, it may help. :)


     
  3. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    Please note, the advice is obviously US and the temperatures are Fareheit because those temps at Celsius would at least severly burn your frog, if not kill it outright. The Celcius equivalent are 24.5 and 25.5 degrees. The strength of the mixture: 1 level teaspoon = 5.6 g NaCl; 1 US cup (non-metric) = 236 mL (or now 240 mL); Solution strength = 23.7 g per litre = 2.24% (or now 23.3 g per litre = 2.33%).

    You are looking at exactly the same cure, just applied somewhat differently. I will say that the temperature guide is a definite plus, as a temperature in the mid-twenties will not distress the frog in any way while maximising the effects of the solution.

    Blue
     
  4. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    Is the water heated to that temperature so it can take on that percentage of salt or more for the comfort of the frog?
     
  5. SarahScales

    SarahScales Well-Known Member

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    Okay, if you are treating a fungal infection in frogs you want to use 'NON-iodized table salt', you can buy it from the supermarket and it is the same thing as the aquarium salt you get from pet stores.
     
  6. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    My apologies. I did not express myself very well.

    The temperature has nothing to do with the amount of salt dissolved, just the maximum temperature at which frogs can be assured of being comfortable and at which you can expect the maximum level of interactive effect on the fungus. NaCl is highly soluble and being a simple ionic substance I would expect near maximum dissociation at even low temperatures. So without checking I’d reckon its solubility-temperature curve to be fairly flat. It doesn't really matter because solubilities and solution strengths are quoted at 25[SUP]o[/SUP]C, unless otherwise stated. It’s like technically the solvent should be added to the solute/solution to make up exactly one litre – but the degree of error in not doing so is not significant.

    Cypher,
    Please do let us know how the frog gets on.

    Blue
     
  7. Lachie3112

    Lachie3112 Not so new Member

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    I have a question about these saline solutions.

    Could they be used to get rid of mould in a tank setup? I currently have some growing (small amounts) on a log in my tank, and was wondering if I could use it to get rid of it permanently (or for a while).
     
  8. Cypher69

    Cypher69 Well-Known Member

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    The GTF is fine.
    Over the long weekend I used the 0.9% saline solution from the chemist & added a pinch of salt (from local petshop) to slightly increase the salinity.
    Anyway after talking to the vet on the phone this morning, he says that fungal growths protrude or are obviously raised above the skin whereas what I may be describing sounds more like a blemish in the skin. The grey markings haven't grown in size or spread at all plus the frog is healthy & active. I'll keep it in quarantine for another 2 weeks before deciding to release it back into the viv with the others.
     
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