Saw shelled turtle

Discussion in 'Other Australian Reptiles and Amphibians' started by Jude L, Oct 4, 2019.

  1. Jude L

    Jude L New Member

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    Hey,

    Im wanting to get a saw shelled turtle soon and I’ve done nine months of research. But I can’t find much specific info on these turtles. Are there any specific requirements I should know?
     
  2. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Hey there. Saw-shells have an average adult SCL (Straight Carapace Length) of 20cm but large females can get to up to and a smidge over 30cm. In the captive trade, as far as turtles go, Saw-shells are considered bulletproof and are a good "beginner's choice" as they offer a bit more tolerance to rookie errors when it comes to husbandry and water quality than the more particular sensitive species out there. They are chiefly carnivorous/insectivorous when it comes to feeding preferring small whole live fish (guppies, feeder fire-tail gudgeons), crayfish, shrimps, aquatic snails, dragonfly nymphs, windfall terrestrial insects, (in captivity woodies are a good option) they will also take earthworms/compost worms, soldier fly gents and silkworms (all high in calcium) - but they will sporadically take aquatic plant material so this should always be available to them. Plants such as thin valisneria, Elodea, frogbit, Azolla, duckweed and watercress. Saw-shells in the wild naturally occur from the tropical northern parts of QLD right down the East coast down into the southern more temperate regions of QLD and northern NSW. An aquarium with a water temperature set at 22-26 degrees would be perfectly suitable for this species whilst maintaining a salinity of 0.05% with aquarium salt and a pH of 7.6 (by using cal-grit) as a substrate mixed with soft natural river sand to a depth of no more than 3cm.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2019

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