Shell grit and Calgrit.

Discussion in 'Other Australian Reptiles and Amphibians' started by wally3218, Jul 21, 2020.

  1. wally3218

    wally3218 Not so new Member

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    I’ve just set up a new turtle tank and have medium size pebbles as a substrate.
    I was wanting to use calgrit as suggested but calgrit is difficult to source at the moment.
    Can shell grit can be used instead of calgrit and can I add it to my pebbles or should I remove the pebbles first.
     
  2. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Hi, it's advisable that you do NOT use shell grit in the aquarium as a substrate as it it far too coarse and abrasive... it will cut your turtle's skin. If you can bag it in a stocking, you can add it to a tray inside a canister filter, that way it will still buffer the pH, GH and KH without being of any harm to your turtle/s.

    Rocks, stones and pebbles or gravel have no place in a turtle aquarium. The ideal substrate is natural river sand mixed with calgrit. Decor should be assorted pieces of driftwood. :)
     
  3. wally3218

    wally3218 Not so new Member

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    Thanks for your reply flaviemys-purvisi
    I’m learning not to trust pet shops.
    What about plants is there any I should look out for.
     
  4. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Just stick with Elodea and Vallisneria and you won't go wrong.
     
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  5. wally3218

    wally3218 Not so new Member

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  6. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Bunnings play sand, (Beach sand) when viewed under a microscope reveals how sharp and abrasive it is, it is high in silica (quartz) which does not fracture easily and the grains are sharp and jagged edged.
    13627187_1182085591823381_6773858099002771623_n.jpg
    Natural river sand is a better option.
     
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