• Check out the new Feedback and suggestions forum. This adds the ability to add ideas for the site and upvote/downvote them. It would be great to hear from you all in how we can boost site activity and who would like to assist with some exciting ideas from Rob and I.
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champagne

Well-Known Member
should common, cross or unknown locality species that hold no conservation value thus being nothing more then pets be on the licensing system? I think that only pure locality reptiles that hold conservation value should be on license. These licenses should only be give to people with real interest in conservation that what to help hold pure genes that one day could be used to repopulate extinct reptiles in the wild.
 

Pitttownboy

Active Member
No animal should be on licence, I don't need a licence for a cockatoo and its native why should I need a licence for a reptile. Money making system used to control people next you'll need a license for children(not a bad idea).
 

champagne

Well-Known Member
No animal should be on licence, I don't need a licence for a cockatoo and its native why should I need a licence for a reptile. Money making system used to control people next you'll need a license for children(not a bad idea).
I was thinking more on the lines of being able to collect from local populations thus knowing it is defiantly pure from known localities and using the licensing system as more of a way to keep track of the lines
 

saintanger

Very Well-Known Member
if there are no licenses then whats to stop people from poaching till we have nothing left. common species would be still targeted to the point they would not be common no more.

i know they just wanna make money off us paying for a license, but i rather pay and know that it does help stop poaching. some people will still poach with or with out a license but they are more likely to get caught by a nosey neighbour or someone who dislikes them dobbing them in.

common and unknown locality species do hold conservation value in my eyes. i love going down the bush and seeing jakys, water dragons, eastern bearded dragons and eastern long necks but over the years i have seen their number go down and in summer and spring i see teenagers down there trying to catch them. if we did not need a license to keep these common species we would not have much left.
 
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Maxwell

Active Member
Im for licensing,

These animals dont reproduce at staggering rates in the wild, the industry already has a big enough problem of people poaching and then "birthing" new animals onto the license. Id hate to imagine what the damage to a reptile such as a shingle back would occur.
 

Ramy

Active Member
The reason the licences exist is someone out there is hoping that
1. So that people who want reptiles make an active decision to get such a pet, therefore they are more likely to plan the process and not end up neglecting them
2. Reptiles are less likely to be caught from the wild, or released into the wild when someone gives up. (protecting individual specimens, as well as trying to reduce the chances of diseases being introduced to the wild populations)
3. That maybe it will promote information sharing so that people are more likely to learn how to get a registered python and less likely to try to get an illegal import like a corn snake

It's not a money making system, IMO they only really charge for their administrative services. The Code of Practice in NSW is a good thing, and it's trying to promote good husbandry practices across the board. Unfortunately the COP is badly executed, so it sucks. But it's a good thing in theory. Also, if you want a pedigree on a tanami woma, or a MD diamond, or whatever... maybe you should set up a private association like the Australian National Kennel Council and try to convince people to pay you to register their pedigrees with you?
 

Pitttownboy

Active Member
Birds haven't been exploited, reptiles weren't exploited 20 yrs ago why would it change now, I bet there is as many illegal reptiles in captivity as there is legal ones
 
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Snowman

Guest
If its not a money making scam why does it cost me $350 a year for a license to keep olive pythons????
 

Ramy

Active Member
Birds haven't been exploited, reptiles weren't exploited 20 yrs ago why would it change now, I bet there is as many illegal reptiles in captivity as there is legal ones

I disagree. I heard the story about the "Penny turtle" or "petshop turtle" which is a pretty lame one. The myth is that there's a turtle that stays small and you can keep it in an aquarium fairly easily. This guy knew how to find eggs, hatch them, and would sell the hatchlings to petshops. They rarely survived, and if they did they got pretty big. Someone interested in conservation spent years trying to track down the turtles, and once they found them and were able to monitor their population, he found they were endangered.

Similarly, Womas are considered to be endangered (or atleast rare), as are frilled-neck lizards and so on. Do you really think it would be okay for someone to decide they want a pet and wander into the bush to get it on the cheap? The licencing works to discourage as many people as possible from doing that. Sure you can't eliminate all poaching, but it helps.
 

Ramy

Active Member
If its not a money making scam why does it cost me $350 a year for a license to keep olive pythons????

In NSW it's approx. $30 per year for a basic licence, and $60 per year for an advanced class licence. Seems pretty reasonable to me. I don't know about the other states, though.
 
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Snowman

Guest
Haha. Well over here we talk in hundreds.... Plus we can't move an animal or give it away without paying a dealer $50.
 

Ramsayi

Very Well-Known Member
APS Veteran
Trusted Seller
Haha. Well over here we talk in hundreds.... Plus we can't move an animal or give it away without paying a dealer $50.

Sux to keep reptiles in WA.You could always move to Australia :lol:
 
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Snowman

Guest
Yeah I came from Melbourne... Escaped to the lucky country where they pay ridiculous sums of money to work in the resource sector. Probably why we have crazy prices for licensing....
 

Pitttownboy

Active Member
I disagree. I heard the story about the "Penny turtle" or "petshop turtle" which is a pretty lame one. The myth is that there's a turtle that stays small and you can keep it in an aquarium fairly easily. This guy knew how to find eggs, hatch them, and would sell the hatchlings to petshops. They rarely survived, and if they did they got pretty big. Someone interested in conservation spent years trying to track down the turtles, and once they found them and were able to monitor their population, he found they were endangered.

Similarly, Womas are considered to be endangered (or atleast rare), as are frilled-neck lizards and so on. Do you really think it would be okay for someone to decide they want a pet and wander into the bush to get it on the cheap? The licencing works to discourage as many people as possible from doing that. Sure you can't eliminate all poaching, but it helps.
This same person only needed 1 pair in captivity and he could have kept doing it, u are always going to get the exploiters, licences are only for those that work within the law unfortunately there will always be those that feel the law does not apply to them. Of those turtles what percentage survived and what percentage would survive in nature. If womas and frillys are rare why are the natives still allowed to eat them, why are the womas found in such a large area from wet coast of WA right across the guts of Aus to near east coast of Queensland. They are in 5 states or territories so I find it hard to believe they are endangered.
 
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Snowman

Guest
Land clearing in the south west of WA has seen them endangered.
 

Pitttownboy

Active Member
If those womas had of been relocated then that areas population would have been damaged I still find it hard to believe there main habitat area of central Australia is under development so loss of habitat
 
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Snowman

Guest
If those womas had of been relocated then that areas population would have been damaged I still find it hard to believe there main habitat area of central Australia is under development so loss of habitat
You are clearly confusing distribution area with population density.

The land is cleared for agricultural farming.

How many wild womas have you seen? I've only seen one to date. Though lots of other pythons....
 
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