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Snake handler bitten

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Zipidee

Active Member
Hi everyone,

I just want to correct some unhelpful stuff that some of you may have read on other forums (thankfully not this one!!!) and social media re a gold coast snake catcher being bitten by a Rough-scaled Snake yesterday. I won't use names here, but much of the misinformation has been spread by another, controversial, snake handler in Melbourne. I think most of you will know who I mean.

The facts are these: yes, a Gold Coast snake catcher was bitten by a Rough-scale snake yesterday, however, it was a (dry) warning bite and blood tests have shown he was not invenomated. He did however, suffer anaphylactic shock, perhaps from a miniscule portion of venom on the fangs, or some other factor, and he was hospitalised overnight. While the reaction was quite serious, he was not "near death" and is in fact back at work today. I have been in direct contact with the gold coast snake catcher and his family and can assure these are the facts.

Many of you keep snakes. Most of us have been tagged, including this certain snake handler from Melbourne (I've seen the videos). It happens. Full-stop. Anything you read on other forums or social media, is speculative at best, and most likely wrong.

Thanks for reading.
 

OldestMagician

Well-Known Member
I don't know what has previously been said about this, but to me it seems like one of the potential risks of the job. You handle snakes for a job then there is a good chance you'll get bitten one day. Like being an electrician. One day you might get a belt due to the fact you do it every day.
And it's not always down to negligence, a moments distraction or an unforeseen circumstance and you can get hurt.
 

spud_meister

Active Member
Having no knowledge of the larger reptile keeper world, and just being a rather anti-social reptile enthusiast, is there really that level of pettiness and competitiveness in the snake handler world?
 

sd1981

Well-Known Member
Having no knowledge of the larger reptile keeper world, and just being a rather anti-social reptile enthusiast, is there really that level of pettiness and competitiveness in the snake handler world?


This is not even the start of it mate... The amount of mud slinging and petty rubbish that does go on from time to time really is not far from what you'd see at preschool at lunchtime when there's not enough pudding cups to go around!!! Lol...

Glad to hear that the handler is ok... Always a bit scary when a bite involving an elapid occurs...
 

Zipidee

Active Member
Having no knowledge of the larger reptile keeper world, and just being a rather anti-social reptile enthusiast, is there really that level of pettiness and competitiveness in the snake handler world?

You have no idea of the pettiness and malicious intent of this particular individual in Melbourne. His determination to destroy not just someone else's business, but ruin their life is quite galling.
 

mikey_mike

Active Member
Hi everyone,

blood tests have shown he was not invenomated. He did however, suffer anaphylactic shock, perhaps from a miniscule portion of venom on the fangs, or some other factor, and he was hospitalised overnight. While the reaction was quite serious, he was not "near death"]

I haven't read anything about this other than this thread, but why let that stop me engaging in some petty hair splitting. Either he was envenomated or he wasn't. Something caused anaphylaxis. Perhaps venom, perhaps something else. Perhaps antivenom was administered? Who knows.

Anyway from a medical perspective anaphylactic shock is "as close to death" as good going envenomation - both are fatal without treatment.
 

Lachie3112

Not so new Member
I agree with mikey_mike; anaphylactic shock or anaphylaxis is a serious reaction and potentially life-threatening. You don't develop it without being exposed to something that you are (most likely) allergic or susceptible to.

In this case, since he was supposedly not envenomated, it may be likely that venom still came into contact with his skin, and as such he probably developed anaphylaxis from this. Now I can't say that I am an expert on allergic reactions or snake handling, but I don't think it is wise for someone who has suffered anaphylactic shock from a snake bite (without being envenomated) to have a job or hobby working with venomous snakes, in much the same way as it is unwise for a person with a nut allergy to work in a nut processing factory.
 

butters

Well-Known Member
Not being administered antivenom in no way confirms envenomation did not occur.

- - - Updated - - -

Pretty sure Sdaji who sometimes frequents this site posted about an anaphylactic reaction he had to dried adder venom whilst cleaning his enclosures.

You don't necessarily need to have it injected into your system for you to have a reaction to it.
 

mikey_mike

Active Member
I agree with Lachie, but don't think any of us know enough of the details to discuss the particulars of the anaphylaxis. I hope I if there's any likelihood of coming into contact with the allergen again he will have an epipen nearby.

I'm glad he's ok. I wish the media would focus on the snake bite is survivable with proper first aid angle.
 
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