Snake ID after bite

Discussion in 'General Reptile Discussion' started by sebiimams, Jan 11, 2020.

  1. sebiimams

    sebiimams Not so new Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2020
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    7
    Gender:
    Male

    I got bitten by this thing walking out my front door last night. I thought brown tree snake or slaty-grey, but I ended up heading to the hospital and going through the protocol anyway, as I’m no expert. Any thoughts about what it might be?

    edit: I’m in the rainforest on the edge of Cairns, high enough that we get some tablelands species.
     
  2. tropicbreeze

    tropicbreeze Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2010
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    3
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Top End, NT
    Looks like a Slatey Grey, but definitely not a Brown Tree Snake (Boiga irregularis). I used to get bitten a lot by Slatey Greys before, they seem too stupid to get out of your way at night when you don't see them. Their bites weren't deep or painful, just more of a nuisance. Their teeth managed to hook into the skin and they couldn't seem to let go easily. But the coming of cane toads saw their numbers drop drammatically and rarely see them now.
     
  3. sebiimams

    sebiimams Not so new Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2020
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    7
    Gender:
    Male
    Thanks for that. The local snake catcher confirmed the same thing. It sure was a nice looking animal.

    I’ve seen a couple like this at my house and there are millions of toads. They must have adapted. I actually thought this guy was chasing either a toad or a house gecko.
     
  4. tropicbreeze

    tropicbreeze Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2010
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    3
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Top End, NT
    Cairns got cane toads nearly a century ago, what didn't adapt died out long ago. Those that started adapting have had a long time. It's just over 10 or so years that the first wave of cane toads came through here. A lot of us still remember what used to be around but has been virtually wiped out. It's still a sore point. By next century the those animals that are managing to adapt should have a secure place back in the system.
     

Share This Page