Snake ID (Roadkill)

Discussion in 'Reptile and Amphibian Identification' started by Chanzey, Dec 28, 2012.

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  1. Chanzey

    Chanzey Well-Known Member

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    I know the photos are not the best, I should of taken more but I was getting attacked by the ants.. It was about 1.5m, deep brown, cream belly with no flecks. Apologies for the terrible shots :lol:

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    Cheers
     
  2. Bushman

    Bushman Very Well-Known Member

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    Although there's not much to base an ID on, I'm guessing Common Tree Snake (Dendrelaphis punctulata); primarily based on the narrow head and relatively large eyes. Also the prefrontals and internasals are all more or less equal (prefrontals slightly larger).
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2012
  3. GeckPhotographer

    GeckPhotographer Very Well-Known Member

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    I can see a loreal scale in the picture affirming it's a colubrid. Common Tree Snake appears the most likely candidate of those since it's obviously not a Brown Tree, Slaty or Keelback, and not very likely to be a Northern Tree.
     
  4. Chanzey

    Chanzey Well-Known Member

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    Hmm ok, the white belly kind of through me off. Cheers guys.
     
  5. CamdeJong

    CamdeJong Well-Known Member

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    Definitely D. punctulata, they are usually black in NQ, the head shape is pretty distictive but also the shape of the loreal scale is pretty handy in less obvious cases like this. Long, flat loreal fits common tree.

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    Chanzey if it had been sitting there for a few days the yellow pigment could've broken down. Iridophores don't last long in dead/preserved specimens.
     
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