Snakes and their "familiarity" with their owners.....

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by reptalica, Jun 25, 2012.

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  1. reptalica

    reptalica Very Well-Known Member

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    Having been on here for sometime I don't ever recall seeing a thread about our beloved snakes and their supposed familiarity with us as their owners.

    I know reptiles like beardies, centrals and other dragons, skinks, etc can become quite accustomed to their owners' presence but I was wondering with regards to our snakes over time do they, not so much develop a bond with their owners but do u think they r used to our presence and recognise their owner through regular handling, feeding, husbandry etc or?????

    Are we just another "threat"???

    Thanks again.

    And if they do are any particular species more common than another.
     
  2. shell477

    shell477 Well-Known Member

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    I believe that they become accustomed to our particular smell and perhaps learn to trust us in that way.

    I know for example that when I get my python out and try to give him to someone new, he either tries to head back toward his enclosure or back toward me.
     
  3. notechistiger

    notechistiger Very Well-Known Member

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    I'm of the opinion that they don't recognise us as their OWNER, rather just the person that visits them regularly and sometimes brings nommy food. I think they're very perceptive to our emotions. I notice if I have someone new handling them who isn't really confident, they'll be a little more on edge and more flighty then usual.
     
  4. Jacknifejimmy

    Jacknifejimmy Suspended Banned

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    As far as a snake is concerned we're nothing more than a large, moving place to climb over or a threat.
    They do get used to and accustomed to handling but that is simply negating ourselves as a threat to them and them doing what comes naturally.
    As far as familiarity goes I do believe they become accustomed to our scent - again negating the threat factor we may pose to them.

    Snakes lack the necessary cognitive powers to recognize individual humans and owners the way say a dog would...
     
  5. animal805

    animal805 Well-Known Member

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    I would have to say that all our pythons "recognise" us and have seen the difference in behaviour between us handling them and some one they do not know. Maybe it's just in my head. My female Diamond seeks me out even when there are others close by. Our big male carpet seeks out my middle son, if he is about, as he has his owner of nearly 9 years.
     
  6. Defective

    Defective Very Well-Known Member

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    keiko isnt too bad with 'strangers' but yoda is shocking....he gapes, puffs out his beard and hides under my chin or climbs under my shirt..... i think they recognise us as owners by our body oils and scent...
     
  7. Jande

    Jande Well-Known Member

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    Yep my snakes are great with me but the moment I hand them to my husband to hold... they want out of there most of the time. Occasionally the oldest Childreni will be ok to hang out on his shoulder or ball up in his hands for a short time, but it's rare. If I take out the snakes and let someone else handle them they don't sit still at all. I think they learn who is safe to trust over time. I've said this a few times but I am sure they 'recognise' us individually somehow as my oldest Childreni will follow me around the house if I put it on the floor and leave the room. If my husband is around it'll try to hide somewhere though. :lol:
     
  8. Leasdraco

    Leasdraco Guest

    snakes recognise people by scent.if they are handled by someone who isnt quite confidant they dont feel secure.i think that works both ways,and associate certain scents with safety(or food).
    lizards sometimes recognise people enough to have "favourite" handlers.
     
  9. Jarrod_H

    Jarrod_H Well-Known Member

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    +1 agree
     
  10. snakes123

    snakes123 Very Well-Known Member

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    Sorry didnt read everyones posts but i say yes in a way. My bredli hates me, and i believe its just me. I handle him all the time, then give him to someone else such as my brother and you would think he is the most placid snake. I havnt done anything wrong, but i think they do get atatched to certain things but not sure what it would be in my case.
     
  11. littlemay

    littlemay Well-Known Member

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    I don't think my snakey likes men, he's completely relaxed with me, my sisters, even my mother (who up until recently was horrified at the prospect of handling him). My boyfriend on the other hand... he gets all zoomy/squirmy, constantly striking and on the defensive, i've always figured it must be the different scent.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2012
  12. Manda1032

    Manda1032 Very Well-Known Member

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    Funny, I had a bredli who hated me too. From the moment it saw me walk into the room it would strike at the side of the enclosure. I ended up rehoming it to a lovely couple, I just couldn't have it doing that to me it's primary care giver and he only did it with me (sexed as a def He). All my kids know who mummy is and even seek me out for reassurance when out of their enclosures. Some don't mind being handled by others but they always come back to their mummy. It's reassuring for me to know that they would not go quietly if someone took them, Especially Jub my Beardie. He doesn't really like strangers at all.
     
  13. Skelhorn

    Skelhorn Very Well-Known Member

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    My snakes usually try to come back in my general direction when others are holding them. I agree with the aboves. Its based entirely on smell and scents.
    Either way when i go to my bredli tank he thinks its dinner time and always goes to the right hand lower corner!
     
  14. Ally04

    Ally04 Active Member

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    Our spotted girl seems to no my partner. If I'm holding her, he just needs to put her hand near her and she goes straight to him. Maybe she just doesn't like me lol
     
  15. longqi

    longqi Very Well-Known Member

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    Last sentence should be phrased slightly differently
    So I will correct it for you

    "Humans lack the necessary investigative skills to recognize the cognitive/emotional abilities of reptiles"

    We try to use mammalian tests to prove reptiles have or have not various skills and abilities
    Perhaps if we begin to consider that tests based on mammal brains may not work on reptiles we may take the first step forward in trying to understand them

    We have so much to learn and we are so proud of drawing conclusions on things that we have no real knowledge of
     
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