Snakes In Plastic Tubs?

Discussion in 'General Reptile Discussion' started by Callum Dureau, Dec 20, 2016.

?
  1. Plastic tub

    5 vote(s)
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  2. Glass enclosure

    4 vote(s)
    44.4%
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  1. Callum Dureau

    Callum Dureau Active Member

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    I've read other websites and as far as I have read plastic tubs are better for pythons, as they hold heat and humidity better than glass enclosures. But i'm not sure, want to see what you people think.
     
  2. Hoplo

    Hoplo Subscriber Subscriber

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    i use tubs for all my snakes, glass enclosures should never be used for any snake in my opinion
     
  3. princessparrot

    princessparrot Very Well-Known Member

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    How about wooden enclosures?
     
  4. dragonlover1

    dragonlover1 Subscriber Subscriber

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    most of our pythons are in wooden enclosures but I have a pair of pygmy banded pythons in glass tanks until they get bigger then they will move into wood.The only things in plastic tubs in my house are the bugs.
     
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  5. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    There is nothing wrong with snakes being kept in wooden enclosures. Glass ones are ok, but you will have heat loss. We have two of the Vision racks with tubs, purely for the cost factor. The cost of heating that many enclosures was getting prohibitive. Plus there is the space factor.
     
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  6. ronhalling

    ronhalling Subscriber Subscriber

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    Glass enclosures can be made to retain heat and look good in the bargain for very little money, so the old chestnut about "never" being any good because they don't retain enough heat is crushed nuts in my opinion. I kept the intergrade pictured in my avatar in a 6' x 3' x 3' glass enclosure for seven years and by covering the bottom, 3 sides and the top in 3/8" flat Styrofoam I got from the good guys foam bin I was able to run heat light and mat for much shorter periods than I now do in the timber 1s, and with the artistic use of various pond sealers in different colors the decorating of said foam sheeting is endless. ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°) -ronhalling
     
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  7. Buggster

    Buggster Well-Known Member

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    From my own personal experience, I prefer glass over plastic.

    I suppose it really depends on your area, but as it can get hot and humid in Sydney, particularly in the summer, the plastic tubs just did not work at all.
    When my Woma was in a plastic tub (for a period of 48hrs) during a mild Spring day, even with ventilation holes drilled every 1.5cm across the entire length of the tub, it still rained in there. Took water out- still same effect. Hot, humid and reaching over 40 degrees despite the day being not much over 25.

    Luckily I had on hand (and all set up as I had first intended to buy a larger animal) his 1m glass enclosure. Put him in there and everything went smoothly.

    Glass tank, even in the middle of winter kept at 32 degrees on the hotspot throughout the day.
    Now in summer I struggle to keep the temps down if anything. No insulation or anything- just a nice glass enclosure.

    Snakes are a bit cotton wrapped if anything these days- it's totally and completely natural for them to experience fluctuating temperatures throughout the day, where on earth are you going to find a hotspot of exactly 33 degrees day and night?

    My snakes have improved dramatically ever since I set a day/night cycle for them. I let nighttime temps drop to whatever the room temperature is, and turn the heat back on in the morning. My previously picky Stimsons hasn't missed a feed since I made the change, and is much more active during the night, putting on more muscle tone and in general looks better.

    youve got to remember Aussie snakes are bred tough. Nighttime temps in many places where snakes reside can drop below freezing- yes the residual heat from the day keeps them warm, but my tanks will stay around 25degrees until about 3am where they drop to room temp.

    Again, depends on your own personal preference, local climate and species of snake
     
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  8. Nero Egernia

    Nero Egernia Subscriber Subscriber

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    I don't have snakes, but a few of my lizards live in glass enclosures with no ill effects thus far. For most of my lizards the only type of heating I use is the hot spot, and the ambient temperature is left to nature. I have also used wooden and plastic enclosures as well and they were fine too. I guess it depends on which look you prefer. Personally I think the glass and wooden enclosures make better displays.
     
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  9. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    Ron, I was talking in general terms with the glass enclosures. Of course they can be improved with the use of Styrofoam. We have done exactly that in the 2 glass tanks we have lizards in. The possibilities are endless for decorating them as you say, with paint render expandafoam and imagination.

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
     
  10. pythoninfinite

    pythoninfinite Subscriber Subscriber

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    Six of one, half a dozen of the other in my opinion - dependent on size, ventilation, ambient room temps etc. Buggster, you must have been adding heat somehow for the tub to get to 40C on a 25c day - either a poorly set up heating/thermostat arrangement, or had it in sun coming through a window - there's nothing else that could raise the temps that much. As long as you take measures to maintain suitable temps in either glass (perhaps as Ron suggests), or plastic containers, either will work very well. Aesthetically, I don't think snakes care very much, they're secretive creatures mostly and as long as they've got a sense of security, and are fed & watered sufficiently, they'll be happy.

    I don't use tubs for long-term accommodation, but they are useful and easily sterilised when used for quarantining new acquisitions. My biggest concern with both tubs and aquariums is top-only access, which can be a pain in the but sometimes.

    Jamie
     
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  11. Stompsy

    Stompsy Subscriber Subscriber

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    Plastic tubs (Click Clacks) for hatchies and Wooden enclosure with glass doors for fully grown snakes.
     
  12. Callum Dureau

    Callum Dureau Active Member

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    Ok... looks like tubs are a big no-no
     
  13. baker

    baker Well-Known Member

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    Nothing wrong with tubs and nothing wrong with glass enclosures. As long as you set both up correctly they both work extremely well. There is no one perfect enclosure material as it all depends on your climate, the species you're keeping and how you plan to furnish the enclosure.

    Every different type of enclosure materials have pros and cons, you simply need to weigh up these with your species requirements and what you plan to do with the enclosure.

    Cheers, Cameron
     
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