some people XXXX

Discussion in 'Australian Lizards and Monitors' started by Jeannine, May 23, 2010.

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  1. Jeannine

    Jeannine Very Well-Known Member

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    this was just posted on another site im a member of, this woman really is an idiot and im not just talking about this post either

    tell me are onions dangerous to lizards??


    my lizard just turned her nose up at my dinner lol


    i thought i may as well try it, easier than doing her own special food all the time & she normally likes meat, so what's wrong with mince & onion cooked in the slow cooker? well apparently according to her a LOT [​IMG] she just took a huge detour around the dish to get to the rest of the frozen grapes [​IMG]
     
  2. Jeannine

    Jeannine Very Well-Known Member

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    sorry this is going to be a bit long, but how much of what is posted is fact?? is what she's doing good for the reptile in her care? i have removed names and some other stuff but not the gist of the post


    you are NOT talking about the same type of care as i am! the wildlife group i am with has very experienced members & people who work at reptile parks, zoos etc. they are the people i get my advice from, people with verified experience & training! i suggest maybe you might want to call the australian reptile park, taronga zoo, national parks & wildlife or anyone else who has experience with injured lizards before jumping to conclusions based on your reptile forums, which at times are as bad as this place is on medical advice! know your facts!

    if injured with the type of injuries above, wild lizards do NOT go out in the sun! they find somewhere they can hide away & die end of subject. if you want to keep a lizard alive with injuries where it hides away to die, you give it towels or paper kitty litter or both (depending on it's injuries) you put a thermastate controlled heat pad under either the whole enclosure or part of it (again dependent on injuires) and you put a thermometer in the enclosure near the heat pad & you monitor the enclosure temp

    you monitor the lizards condition & treat the injuries as much as possible without stressing to the point where the stress does harm. you keep the lizard in a darkened environment until the injuries reach the point where the lizard is ready to come out & start living again (generally months) you then encourage the lizard to eat & drink on it's own, which it will generally only do in complete black of night for more months & this can be a very challanging time, working out how many weeks to let the lizard go without eating anything before you force feed again. eventually you get to the point where the lizard starts to be ready for some sunlight (often a year or more after coming into care) by this time you're starting to get to know the lizards personality & so you base the decision on where the sunlight comes from on that. some of mine like outdoor genuine sunshine, some like to be near me for security while in the sun, others genuine sunshine but only if i'm out of site, others like a heat lamp & refuse to be outdoors still. around this time it's also normally possible to put them into an enclosure that allows them to choose heat pad or cool.

    once they accept the sunshine, it's then a question of working with their shedding cycles because aroudn shedding time they will again generally refuse to be in the sun & need to be kept moist & on the heat pad. if they choose to go off the heat pad, then again often you can put the lamp on as often as you like, but they still aint coming anywhere near it! & if they go off the heat pad & refuse sunshine they generally stop eating too

    i'm not talking here about the type of lizards you have!!!! by the time they're nearing release they behave like yours do & when i see that i release! first sign they're ready to release, they come out each day for a feed if hungry, an explore & sunbake & they control their own movements on & off the heatpad to regulate their own temperature. once they're doing that consistantly i move them to an outdoor enclosure & monitor to ensure they are sunning themselves & then put snails & other live food in the cage for them to find & eat when hungry as well as various fruit veggies, meat, eggs etc with a range of native vegitation & things they will find in the wild that are edible. i feed them at different times whenever feeding. i wouldn't feed after about 3-4 pm in any but the hottest months as they need time to digest the food before it gets cold. no way i would be feeding only an hour before sunset in this weather!

    they are then released after being fattened up as much as possible in good weather & early enough in the year that they can orientate themselves to their new surroundings & find somewhere for tarpar (generally about April would be the latest i'd release, if not ready by then, they stay inside on the optional heat pad & sunlamp till spring & spend time in their cage but also out exploring & ensuring their behaviour remains as natural as possible, plus real sunlight on warm days)

    so that's how injured lizards go. sorry but they jsut don't behave the same way as healthy ones & it's silly & misinformed to suggest they do!

    as for calcium, well calcium of course comes from food. i feed them chicken and roo mince (the mince that has chunks of bone, beak etc in it designed for suplimenting calcium) plus woomaroo "reptile supliment" and a mix of veggies, legumes etc that also contain calcium, but primarily they're covered by the supliment & the mince is an extra top up (given teh bone injuries so many have, it's important that they have higher levels than normal) vitamin D they get from the supliment too, a little more from the sunlight but i always feed all of mine food containing vitamin d as you can't rely on injured reptile behaviour allowing them enough sunlight consistantly for vitamin D


    the pic above is one of my care lizards who was run over by a car. she was brain damaged & lost one eye & had such extensive injuries that she was not capable of eating or drinking for over 3 months! i bathed her to get fluids into her, washed the blood out of her mouth regularly & tube fed her liquid consistance food before gradually getting her to eat soft foods & then harder & harder foods (and all the time she was on a liquid diet, i still had to stimulate & clean her teeth so as not to allow infection or rotting in as happens if lizards don't chew hard foods) once she was ready for the sunshine & to come out of hiding, i had to teach her to walk again because due ot her injuries she would spin in circles & claw her own tail. i had to rehab her with gentle streches to stop her muscles & body seising up, move her legs for her, gently massage & strech her neck so that over months she was able to straighten it again, help her with each shed, teach her how to identify dangers like birds with only one eye & mostly & most difficulty, try to teach her not to go back onto roads like the one where she was originally run over (or at least to fear car noises). what's that? lizards go onto roads? why would they do that that's not natural is it? lizards don't like heat on their belly, they never lie on roads or driveways or warm rocks, they only ever want their heat from above
     
  3. It's almost all total crap. This poster is one very serious GOOSE! Just about everything she states as fact is incorrect.

    J.
     
  4. hawkesbury reptiles

    hawkesbury reptiles Well-Known Member

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    All I can say is....sorry, I can't post, it will offend....but this is typical.

    Kelly
     
  5. shane14

    shane14 Very Well-Known Member

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    ask her does she want her animal to be sick or healthy, if healthy read caresheets, and dont just make info
     
  6. AM Pythons

    AM Pythons Very Well-Known Member

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    go & tell her she is the laughing stock of every reptile forum online...
     
  7. AUSHERP

    AUSHERP Well-Known Member

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    hahahaha what a maniac!
     
  8. GeckoJosh

    GeckoJosh Almost Legendary

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    "eventually you get to the point where the lizard starts to be ready for some sunlight (often a year or more after coming into care)".

    I wonder how many lizards would survive a year in a dark box without at least developing MBD?
     
  9. shane14

    shane14 Very Well-Known Member

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    stupid people that are so naive to the requirements for the housing of reptiles and their requirements as Reptilians. OMFG
     
  10. GeckoJosh

    GeckoJosh Almost Legendary

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    How did she teach a lizard not to go on roads and be scared of birds?, did she do somethign similar to a Clockwork Orange syle therapy????

    The sad thing is someone will read this on the other forum and accept it as fact.

    Gex
     
  11. CodeRed

    CodeRed Very Well-Known Member

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    this is a prime example of why smoking crack is bad
     
  12. -Peter

    -Peter Guest

    While the overall statement isn't sound the bulk of it is reasonably correct.
    People who care for injured wildlife are not hobbyist and often become didactic about the shallow knowledge they have as it often has been re-interpreted from a reliable and often knowledgable source.
    I am unsure of the original agenda for this thread.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 23, 2010
  13. Elapidae1

    Elapidae1 Very Well-Known Member

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    Yeah she seems a little eccentric and a few odd ideas but I don't think she's to far of the mark, she maybe has difficulty putting her ideas and methods into words
     
  14. Kristy_07

    Kristy_07 Very Well-Known Member

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    +1
     
  15. ssssnakeman

    ssssnakeman Almost Legendary

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    How true, and great use of the word didactic
    Lol
     
  16. syeph8

    syeph8 Very Well-Known Member

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    +1
    i love the word didatic and forgot it existed to tell the truth. fantastic word and needs to be used more :p
     
  17. Elapidae1

    Elapidae1 Very Well-Known Member

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    I never even knew it did exist and had to check my dictionary just to make sure it wasn't an evil ploy to make me feel stupid, now I will just go back to my maths lesson on your thread, and wait for the right time to employ the use of my recently expanded vocabulary
     
  18. syeph8

    syeph8 Very Well-Known Member

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    hahahah well didacticism is in my nature :p
     
  19. Jeannine

    Jeannine Very Well-Known Member

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    no hidden agenda with this thread

    it started because she posted about offering her blue tongue some cooked mince and onion, i had a go at her because i was sure giving your lizard onion wasn't the right thing to do and curiosity got me seeking out advice

    that long post was in response to me saying as far as i knew reptiles should not be feed at night?

    unfortunately this person is someone who believes in not matter what the topic she is the expert, and i was wondering if the advice she was given was in actual fact the correct advice as i honestly couldn't see a reptile expert suggesting she feed it onion or feed it at night so again thought i would ask in the right place

    she is the type of person who believes her advice is the only one people should listen to

    shes done a course thru ST Jonh's so thinks her advice is the correct advice

    did childcare for a few years then left, now does some holiday care with kids in acting etc so thinks she now can go in and tell parents how to raise their children, what to do, when to do it, etc

    does wildlife rescue and caring but is an expert in all things native and her advice is the only correct stuff

    she recently found herself now confined to a wheelchair and suddenly is an expert in all things 'disabled in a wheelchair', repeatedly places herself at risk of severe injury often, gets offended when anyone dares asks her if she needs a hand with anything, in fact she is even offended that they seem to care and she also believes they think she is incapable of doing anything

    after a while she gets very annoying, but as i said part of me was curious in whether or not her information posted in regards to caring for lizards was correct and accurate or whether she was doing more harm then good in the long run

    she believes the advice she gets from the Reptile Zoo and other wildlife experts is far more superior then advice any person on a reptile forum could give out because an injured reptile is totally different to a native one and as such 'normal' rules don't apply, i wouldn't be the least bit surprised if she has been given very good advice by the experts but has twisted it around to suit herself and what she see's as the right stuff
     
  20. Megzz

    Megzz Well-Known Member

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    :lol: Has she mistaken her lizard for a dog??
     
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