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richoman_3

Very Well-Known Member
Couple quick trips, not really too much

here...

enjoy..

if you want more info on anything let me know.


Central Bearded Dragon (Pogona vitticeps) head detail by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Tessellated gecko (Diplodactylus tessellatus) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Spotted Marsh Frog (Limnodynastes tasmaniensis) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Curl Snake (Suta suta) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Burton's Legless Lizard (Lialis burtonis) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Burton's Legless Lizard (Lialis burtonis) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Marble-faced Delma (Delma australis) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Robust Striped Skink (Ctenotus robustus) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Nobbi Dragon (Diporiphora nobbi) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Nobbi Dragon (Diporiphora nobbi) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr


patternless

Beaded Gecko (Lucasium damaeum) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr


Mallee Dragon (Ctenophorus fordi) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Mallee Dragon (Ctenophorus fordi) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

De Vis' Banded Snake (Denisonia devisi) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Eastern Hooded Scalyfoot (Pygopus schraderi) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Eastern Hooded Scalyfoot (Pygopus schraderi) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Southern Spiny-tailed Gecko (Strophurus intermedius) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Grey-Strike Thrush (Colluricincla harmonica) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr


Lesueur's Tree Frog (Litoria lesueuri) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Green and Golden Bell Frog (Litoria aurea) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Bleating Tree Frog (Litoria dentata) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Jacky Dragon (Amphibolurus muricatus) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Atrax sutherlandi by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Southern Banjo Frog (Limnodynastes dumerili insularis) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Martin's Toadlet (Uperoleia martini) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Martin's Toadlet (Uperoleia martini) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Martin's Toadlet (Uperoleia martini) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Peron's Tree Frog tadpole (Litoria peroni) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Highlands Copperhead (Austrelaps ramsayi) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Highlands Copperhead (Austrelaps ramsayi) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

White-lipped Snake (Drysdalia coronoides) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Murray Rainbow Fish (Melanotaenia fluviatilis) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Murray Rainbowfish (Melanotaenia fluviatilis) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Spencer's Skink (Pseudemoia spenceri) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Spotted Marsh Frog (Limnodynastes tasmaniensis) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr

Azure Kingfisher (Ceyx azureus) by Nick Volpe, on Flickr


Nick
 
C

Channaz

Guest
Great shots, as always. Every photo is superb.

Hard to single any out for more praise than others, but what the hell... I particularly liked the head shots of the White-lipped, the Highlands Copperhead and the Burtons.
 

Bushman

Very Well-Known Member
Great pics!
I particularly like the way you've arranged the subjects and the close-ups are excellent.
Like Ben, I reckon that the lighting is spot-on. What flash unit are you using?
 

ronhalling

Very Well-Known Member
Wow Nick, that is a fabulous pic of the Atrax sutherlandi, and how lucky were you to find a female in such good condition. I have only ever seen 1 of those particular Funnel Webs and it was not even in the Southern NSW or Northern Vic range for that species, 38 years ago in conjunction with Eric Worrell and the Commonwealth Serum Laboratories i spent 14 days mapping the range and distribution of the Blue Mountains Funnel Web (Hadronyche versuta) in the Megalong Valley and the Katoomba escarpment area, during this time i found what appeared at the time to be a Sydney Funnel Web (Atrax robustus) so i kept it to be formally identified later as i thought it strange considering the temperature and topography to find A.robustus that far west. As it turned out when we got back and had it identified it was in fact A.sutherlandi, to this day it still has me scratching my head trying to work out how and why we found it in the Megalong valley, it must have been on holidays. Keep up the great work Nick, your work is going ahead in leaps and bounds, your subject arrangement, use of light and lens choice is superlative, i said it a couple of years ago and i stand by what i said now, You have a brilliant future ahead of you if you decide to take your photographic expertise to the next level, it is a gift rarely seen in someone as young as you and it would be a traversty to see it wasted. :) ...........................................Ron
 

richoman_3

Very Well-Known Member
Wow Nick, that is a fabulous pic of the Atrax sutherlandi, and how lucky were you to find a female in such good condition. I have only ever seen 1 of those particular Funnel Webs and it was not even in the Southern NSW or Northern Vic range for that species, 38 years ago in conjunction with Eric Worrell and the Commonwealth Serum Laboratories i spent 14 days mapping the range and distribution of the Blue Mountains Funnel Web (Hadronyche versuta) in the Megalong Valley and the Katoomba escarpment area, during this time i found what appeared at the time to be a Sydney Funnel Web (Atrax robustus) so i kept it to be formally identified later as i thought it strange considering the temperature and topography to find A.robustus that far west. As it turned out when we got back and had it identified it was in fact A.sutherlandi, to this day it still has me scratching my head trying to work out how and why we found it in the Megalong valley, it must have been on holidays. Keep up the great work Nick, your work is going ahead in leaps and bounds, your subject arrangement, use of light and lens choice is superlative, i said it a couple of years ago and i stand by what i said now, You have a brilliant future ahead of you if you decide to take your photographic expertise to the next level, it is a gift rarely seen in someone as young as you and it would be a traversty to see it wasted. :) ...........................................Ron

Thanks heaps Ron, your replies are always appreciated!
Wow that is interesting to find one all the way out there!. I found about 5 under a couple of big logs in a moist gully in Mallacoota. I took 2 female specimens home with me and left the rest. One of them had an eggsack and the babies hatched a few days ago (photo is on my flickr)
hehe i will never leave photography!, if i could somehow make money off it, it would be handy LOL !

Thanks Ben and Bushman, i use 2 430 EX II canon speedlites on either side of my camera held by a bracket
 

bigg_bunny

Not so new Member
Great shots.You have a real talent for photography. I love the Bell frog and the Burtons. What lens do you use for the macro head shots ?
 
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