The cons of owning a python

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by sammilouise, Jun 2, 2016.

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  1. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    Is that a blue heeler or a blue tongue? ;)
     
  2. ParselTongue

    ParselTongue New Member

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    There aren't any!

    I have owned a Bredli for 4 years and never been tempted to acquire any other snake/s. It would detract from our quality time together. He spends his evenings curled in my lap while I watch TV. Or cruising up and down the hallway before coming to rest his head on my arm where I am sitting on the floor reading to keep him company. When I open the enclosure I am greeted by feather light tongue flickers over my face and neck before he buries his face into my armpit asking for a stroke. Never been bitten or struck (apart from one time in the first week when he was a timid little baby). Mine gets at least 10 minutes stroking in the enclosure every day.

    He only defecates after a meal (once a month) which is easy to pick up as a solid lump and shouldn't smell because you get rid of it immediately. He eats a large rat once a month which is cheaper than any other pet's diet I can imagine. If you do your research, ask intelligent questions of intelligent people you won't have health issues (or will be able to avoid them most of the time) so you aren't doing annual vet checks for vaccinations, heartworm, fleas, ticks, distemper, hepatitis etc. etc. If you don't want people to ask questions about your snake, don't tell people you have one. Simple. Or view their questions as an opportunity to educate their ignorance, fear and superstitions. I agree snakes are long term pets but so are children and that doesn't stop people breeding. Why consider any pet if you aren't prepared to love it and be in it for the long haul unless of course you want one for the novelty and will get rid of it when the next animal is 'in fashion'. As long as the snake has a good thermostat and water it will probably appreciate you going away on a holiday (especially if you like to get it out to show friends or dates!)

    But why would you want to get a fully grown mature snake? If you adopted a human, would you want a baby or an adult? It is far more rewarding to adopt a baby and grow with it. The snake will relate to you (without previous experiences you don't know about affecting its behaviour to you) You will have the opportunity to watch it grow and develop with you, not the end result of someone else's upbringing. If, for example, the previous owner had the snake out and handed around to every visitor it might have been exposed to hysterical behaviour often exhibited by young females, or gripped too tightly, or worse yet held like a hose and 'kinked' which causes pain and makes the snake extremely nervous and prone to strike.If you want a trusting, relaxed snake take it from as young as possible and handle it yourself, and as gently and often as possible.

    I hope I have convinced you there is no downside to owning a snake!
     
    Becsy likes this.
  3. Pauls_Pythons

    Pauls_Pythons Power Seller Power Seller

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    Sorry Iguana but I disagree cost is not that bad compared to some animals. I think if you own only 1 the temptation is to rely on pet stores for food and they do charge a fortune. Find a rodent breeder and buy in bulk. It doesn't take much to work out how many rats you need for 3 months and it will save you time/money driving to the pet store every 2-3 weeks. I think my bill over a year breaks down to about $3.50 per week per animal for food.
     
  4. Iguana

    Iguana Well-Known Member

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    I agree with you after seeing it broken down that way. I should clarify that I'm an unemployed student, with 2 very hungry pythons, so it seems like much more to me, especially since I used to use pet stores. But i've started buying in bulk, so it's not as bad anymore. Sorry for the confusion, the original post was rather specific to my circumstances!
     
  5. ParselTongue

    ParselTongue New Member

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    There aren't any!

    I have owned a Bredli for 4 years and never been tempted to acquire any other snake/s. It would detract from our quality time together. He spends his evenings curled in my lap while I watch TV. Or cruising up and down the hallway before coming to rest his head on my arm where I am sitting on the floor reading to keep him company. When I open the enclosure I am greeted by feather light tongue flickers over my face and neck before he buries his face into my armpit asking for a stroke. Never been bitten or struck (apart from one time in the first week when he was a timid little baby). Mine gets at least 10 minutes stroking in the enclosure every day.

    He only defecates after a meal (once a month) which is easy to pick up as a solid lump and shouldn't smell because you get rid of it immediately. He eats a large rat once a month which is cheaper than any other pet's diet I can imagine. If you do your research, ask intelligent questions of intelligent people you won't have health issues (or will be able to avoid them most of the time) so you aren't doing annual vet checks for vaccinations, heartworm, fleas, ticks, distemper, hepatitis etc. etc. If you don't want people to ask questions about your snake, don't tell people you have one. Simple. Or view their questions as an opportunity to educate their ignorance, fear and superstitions. I agree snakes are long term pets but so are children and that doesn't stop people breeding. Why consider any pet if you aren't prepared to love it and be in it for the long haul unless of course you want one for the novelty and will get rid of it when the next animal is 'in fashion'. As long as the snake has a good thermostat and water it will probably appreciate you going away on a holiday (especially if you like to get it out to show friends or dates!)

    But why would you want to get a fully grown mature snake? If you adopted a human, would you want a baby or an adult? It is far more rewarding to adopt a baby and grow with it. The snake will relate to you (without previous experiences you don't know about affecting its behaviour to you) You will have the opportunity to watch it grow and develop with you, not the end result of someone else's upbringing. If, for example, the previous owner had the snake out and handed around to every visitor it might have been exposed to hysterical behaviour often exhibited by young females, or gripped too tightly, or worse yet held like a hose and 'kinked' which causes pain and makes the snake extremely nervous and prone to strike.If you want a trusting, relaxed snake take it from as young as possible and handle it yourself, and as gently and often as possible.

    I hope I have convinced you there is no downside to owning a snake!
     
  6. Wally

    Wally Subscriber Subscriber

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    ^^^^ Yup. Heard you the first time. :)
     
  7. GBWhite

    GBWhite Well-Known Member

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    Beat me to it Wally...
     
  8. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    I thought I had scrolled the wrong way for a second.....
     
  9. dragonlover1

    dragonlover1 Subscriber Subscriber

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    haha big difference
     
  10. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    In size, as well as toilet habits. Every blue heeler I've ever owned has always done his business in the one corner of the yard.
     
  11. SKYWLKR

    SKYWLKR Active Member

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    There has only ever been one Blue Heeler I loved more than anything in the world.

    Maggie Doyle
     
  12. pythoninfinite

    pythoninfinite Subscriber Subscriber

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    Bluetongues! Blue heelers are great!

    J
     
  13. BredliFreak

    BredliFreak Well-Known Member

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    I would have to disagree with you guys and say there isn't much difference between owning an adult and raising a hatchy. With hatchies, unless you over feed them they will take AGES to grow and you'll get bored. With an adult it doesn't grow and you'll also get bored, not saying snakes are boring but frankly I don't see why he shouldn't get this adult over a hatchy.

    Cons:
    -You have to explain to the idiots of the world how the urban myths aren't true about 100 freaking times a day!
    -Be prepared to never be seen in a good light in society again, luckily for me most people IRL hate me anyway and I couldn't care less :D
     
  14. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    One pro: all of those annoying family members don't visit any more. :D
     
  15. PythonLegs

    PythonLegs Very Well-Known Member

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    There aren't any!

    I have owned a Bredli for 4 years and never been tempted to acquire any other snake/s. It would detract from our quality time together. He spends his evenings curled in my lap while I watch TV. Or cruising up and down the hallway before coming to rest his head on my arm where I am sitting on the floor reading to keep him company. When I open the enclosure I am greeted by feather light tongue flickers over my face and neck before he buries his face into my armpit asking for a stroke. Never been bitten or struck (apart from one time in the first week when he was a timid little baby). Mine gets at least 10 minutes stroking in the enclosure every day.

    He only defecates after a meal (once a month) which is easy to pick up as a solid lump and shouldn't smell because you get rid of it immediately. He eats a large rat once a month which is cheaper than any other pet's diet I can imagine. If you do your research, ask intelligent questions of intelligent people you won't have health issues (or will be able to avoid them most of the time) so you aren't doing annual vet checks for vaccinations, heartworm, fleas, ticks, distemper, hepatitis etc. etc. If you don't want people to ask questions about your snake, don't tell people you have one. Simple. Or view their questions as an opportunity to educate their ignorance, fear and superstitions. I agree snakes are long term pets but so are children and that doesn't stop people breeding. Why consider any pet if you aren't prepared to love it and be in it for the long haul unless of course you want one for the novelty and will get rid of it when the next animal is 'in fashion'. As long as the snake has a good thermostat and water it will probably appreciate you going away on a holiday (especially if you like to get it out to show friends or dates!)

    But why would you want to get a fully grown mature snake? If you adopted a human, would you want a baby or an adult? It is far more rewarding to adopt a baby and grow with it. The snake will relate to you (without previous experiences you don't know about affecting its behaviour to you) You will have the opportunity to watch it grow and develop with you, not the end result of someone else's upbringing. If, for example, the previous owner had the snake out and handed around to every visitor it might have been exposed to hysterical behaviour often exhibited by young females, or gripped too tightly, or worse yet held like a hose and 'kinked' which causes pain and makes the snake extremely nervous and prone to strike.If you want a trusting, relaxed snake take it from as young as possible and handle it yourself, and as gently and often as possible.

    I hope I have convinced you there is no downside to owning a snake!

    - - - Updated - - -

    Sorry, felt left out.
     
  16. pythoninfinite

    pythoninfinite Subscriber Subscriber

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    "Tongue flicks over my face and neck" rings serious alarm bells for me I'm afraid. You'll only want one accidental bite to your face from a large python and you'll regret that type of familiarity. I've seen it happen with others and their "trusted" snakes, it happened to me when I was a kid (copping a fair bite on the lip when I was showing off), and I've seen a "trusted" Lacie give its owner 36 stitches and intravenous antibiotic therapy when it was taken for granted once too often.

    You should never be casual about allowing a python access to your face...

    Jamie
     
  17. Iguana

    Iguana Well-Known Member

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    I heard that if a snake's tongue is flickering at you it's generally okay, only when they raise their head and 'stare' it means you're in trouble? Is this just a myth? Or not really a 'general' rule?
     
  18. pythoninfinite

    pythoninfinite Subscriber Subscriber

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    It's a myth. Ask a rat if it feels generally okay when a snake is flickering its tongue at it. Tongue flicking is a means of sensing its surroundings, and they will do it just before striking at anything. Relying on the primitive reptile brain and its judgements where a critical bite is possible is simply asking for trouble.

    Jamie
     
  19. BredliFreak

    BredliFreak Well-Known Member

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    Hooray for glasses! Hatchies love sitting on my glasses for some reason. Red tries but every time he does they fall off :lol:

    Adopt a human? Those things are feral and if one goes near my house it's straight to the pound! I ain't getting a pet human ever!

    *INCOMING HUMAN DEBATE*
     
  20. GBWhite

    GBWhite Well-Known Member

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