Tips for Newbies thread!

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by CarpetPythons.com.au, Sep 12, 2010.

  1. CarpetPythons.com.au

    CarpetPythons.com.au Well-Known Member

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    I dont know if this has been done before, but maybe this can be turned into a sticky thread?

    1. Never buy a snake on impulse! Read up about them and make sure you know whats involved before you get it or them.
    2. Dont be tight when it comes to the caging and equipment needed to look after them properly.
    3. People underestimate how important it is to read. Too many newbies believe everything they read on a forum. Do yourself a favour and spend a $100 on a good book, even before you buy the animal or its cage.

    Hopefully others will add to this thread.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2010
  2. python_dan89

    python_dan89 Very Well-Known Member

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    +1 mate =)
     
  3. Simple

    Simple Well-Known Member

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    Doing some research and buying a good quality animal from a reputable breeder (so you know its history and help is available if you need it). This would also help to ensure you have a pleasant reptile experience.
     
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  4. cagey

    cagey Subscriber Subscriber

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    As a newbie I worked through each of the following a 2-3 times before planning my equipment needs and snake purchase:
    * Keeping Carpet Pythons by Kortlang and Greem
    * Care of Australian Reptiles in Captivity by Weigel
    * Keeping and Breeding Australian Pythons (ed Swan)
    * fact sheets from people with professional qualifications.

    It was good to look for where there was consistency of information. Then I started asking questions on here and other forums ... finally I purchased.
     
  5. pythrulz

    pythrulz Very Well-Known Member

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    Good advice yes how to build a click clak is a sticky thread I used it to build mine same as a lot of people also what I think is important dont place your reptile in direct sunlight even though books are good they cant beat exspereince
     
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  6. i did hours of reserch on the internet everyday for weeks :D
    and i mean weeks everyday after school id reseach for 3-4 hours
    after about 2 months when i saved up enough money i got my first snake had her for 3 weeks now
    and already have started saving for my next :D
     
  7. Snakelove

    Snakelove Very Well-Known Member

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    Buying a hatchy only if its an established feeder with a feeding record! and don't worry too much with it being snappy! snappy = awesome feeders
     
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  8. pythonmum

    pythonmum Subscriber Subscriber

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    Don't settle for something that's okay, but doesn't really thrill you. Save the extra money or wait for the next season to get an animal you really want. Remember that snakes live 20 - 30 years and ugly ones cost just as much to feed and house.
     
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  9. AM Pythons

    AM Pythons Very Well-Known Member

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    baby snakes do bite(as all snakes can, its what they do when scared- defend themselves) There is no such thing as a snake that doesnt bite..(i get asked alot..)
     
  10. dtm4130

    dtm4130 New Member

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    how old

    when someone advertises a python as "advanced juvenile" roughly how old are they talking about
     
  11. Sigman21

    Sigman21 Active Member

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    if your buying a juvenile have the adult size cage either already built or have the money put aside to buy one so when it comes time to move the snake your not stuck with nowhere to house it
     
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  12. redbellybite

    redbellybite Almost Legendary

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    THIS NEEDS TO BE A STICKY ALL ON ITS OWN .......the amount of people that query about their snakes being bitey, flighty and wonder if they should sell it on and get a placid quiet non biting snake ...if that is what you want and you want 100% NO BITE RISK ...BUY A RUBBER ONE!!!!!!!! ...if not ,accept it, before you buy a snake ..and with any luck ,as most find out ..their snakes do quieten down and become more easy to handle ..BUT some never do ..
     
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  13. Pythons Rule

    Pythons Rule Very Well-Known Member

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    my tip to not getting bitten;

    1. if your snake is clearly going to shed, leave it alone.
    2. if your snake is in "S" shape and your see its eyes (pupils) turn real big, good indicator to leave it alone.
    3. if you must hand feed cause you think tongs are for whooses and your feeding pinky to small rats then my advise is don't be dumb and get the tongs lol ;) been bitten and finger chewed too many times by hand feeding hatchies to yearlings without tongs...learnt after that hehe and trust me if a hatchy or yearling is hungry and gets a taste for blood its very painful to have them eat your finger right down to the knuckle.

    biting with food response;

    1. if your an unlucky keeper to experience a food responsive finger chewing incident the only way to remove them safely from chewing more of you finger is to run luck warm water from the tap over there face, they will need to stop chewing and release your finger to get some air. when they do come up make sure your have food item available so they don't go you again.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 13, 2010
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  14. The_Dreaded_Pets

    The_Dreaded_Pets Well-Known Member

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    on another note findout where your nearest herp vet is in some cases it could be several hrs away.
    also herp vets are much more expensive then normal vets are you prepared to pay these bills if need be??
     
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  15. Snakeluvver2

    Snakeluvver2 Suspended Banned

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    Make a friendly relationship with the breeder you buy the snake off.
    They will give you answers that are easy to understand because you can tell them your full predicament, will generally be right and will want the animals safety and health to be top notch!

    So keep in touch with the breeder!
     
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  16. byron_moses

    byron_moses Suspended Banned

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    couldnt agree more i had keeping and breeding pythons for a year before i bought my first python and it helped alot

    ensure you a re buying from a clean collection
     
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  17. mysnakesau

    mysnakesau Almost Legendary

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    I have another tip to add:-

    While it is important that reptiles have their warm spots, don't under estimate how damaging too much heat can do to them. With summer just around the corner it is time to keep a good check on the temperatures in enclosures and turning off heating on really hot days to prevent your pets overheating. HEAT kills and does so very quickly.

    Don't leave your reptiles outside in enclosures in plastic or glass containers. Even if they do have a shady spot, plastic and glass will heat up like an oven. I put my animals outside in a mesh vivarium (well, a clothes basket from camping place). They have sun and shade but I still make sure the shaded area is sufficiently cool for them. I use rocks and ceramic pots to create shade for them, but if the sun is overpowering, artificial shading will do nothing to help them stay cool.

    Not saying don't have their heat on, or don't take them outside. Just be cautious and don't let them cook to death.
     
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  18. Cheyne_Jones

    Cheyne_Jones Well-Known Member

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    Best tip I can give is do your research and do it properly!

    You need to be on top of a lot of things when you get your first reptile; heating, feeding, enclosure, substrate, hides etc.

    There is nothing worse than seeing people buy something then come on here not knowing what to feed, how to heat, or the old chestnut of 'it bit me what do I do'?

    They are easy to look after if you start out with all the right knowledge.

    Also, they are not cuddle toys, they dont want to be draped around you neck all day and night, and yes they will bite you if they feel like it... If you want something to cuddle have a kid!
     
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  19. Luohanfan

    Luohanfan Active Member

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    Maybe buy a kitten would be better :)
    I'm a newb myself, and i done a lot of research (3 months worth) before i got mine..
    I still got worried when they first shed, but i was expecting it..
    Best advice is, research research research, and buying from a good breeder is good, the guy i got mine off doesnt mind if i call him anytime.. but hopefully i wont have to as ive done a lot of research!
     
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  20. FAY

    FAY Guest

    AArrrhhh.......
    When getting a new python...leave it alone.........until it settles down. Cannot stress this enough..they are not toys..
    NO handling.......especially hatchies.........handle them to clean only...they will naturally settle down when they realise there is nothing to hurt them...

    You can always get your psycho one that will never be nice.
     
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