Understanding Identification.

Discussion in 'Reptile and Amphibian Identification' started by Poggle, Dec 19, 2011.

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  1. PilbaraPythons

    PilbaraPythons Very Well-Known Member

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    But the question was what are the 2 species and why in regards to the Slatey grey and the Eastern small eyed, this is why anyone reading Echiopsis earlier post should have answered it.
     
  2. Elapidae1

    Elapidae1 Very Well-Known Member

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  3. GeckPhotographer

    GeckPhotographer Very Well-Known Member

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    Misleading backround Elapidae, seeing as pulchs are usually less sand and repes are usually more sandy. :p (Trying not to totally spoil the fun for those who don't know).
     
  4. Echiopsis

    Echiopsis Well-Known Member

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    Shot was taken in habitat, both species can be found in either habitat in some areas ;)
     
  5. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    1[SUP]st[/SUP] pics: The head appeared to be mostly hidden under the corner of the bag and I could only just make out half a dozen scale or so. Apparent size was around half a metre which in combination with a grey or grey-brown colour, rules out most small elapids. You do on rare occasions get unmarked keelbacks even rarer with roughies but there were no keels evident on the visible scales. The body was too stout for a whip snake but more particularly, the tail narrowed quickly after the vent and was not very long. Whips narrow very gradually and have a very, very thin tail.

    2[SUP]nd[/SUP] pic. As stated.

    3[SUP]rd[/SUP] pic. Keels. Loreal scale. Upper labials under eye edged with black. Angle of jaw has a distinct upward curve (smile).

    4[SUP]th[/SUP] pic. Suburban Perth. Gwardars occurs north of a lone from Yanchep to Waneroo to Ellenbrook through Swan Valley then north-east into the hills. The rostral scale is broader than Western Browns and the front of the head is slightly squarer. It is irregularly spotted – the other name for Dugites is Spotted Brown Snake.

    5[SUP]th[/SUP] pic Elapid as no loreal. Red on latero-ventral scales which have a black posterior margin.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 20, 2011
  6. Wookie

    Wookie Well-Known Member

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    Wow, surprising people can be jumping on him for the poor quality photos. Do you always have a perfect view of a snake out in the field to look for the finer features that you find in a 20MP photograph?
     
  7. Elapidae1

    Elapidae1 Very Well-Known Member

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    As Echiopsis has said shot was taken in habitat. It was found under a piece of fallen blackboy (and photographed under it)
    I was surprised by its location
     
  8. Australis

    Australis Almost Legendary

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    What post is this animal in?
     
  9. GeckPhotographer

    GeckPhotographer Very Well-Known Member

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    Know an environmental consultant from Perth that reckons even in the hills on harder soils he almost always gets the repens and it's not till he's in areas that are almost totally stone that he gets the pulchella in material between two stones and around the base of stones. That said I've never seen either and I'm simply going off what hearsay and books say they usually inhabit, and everyone with half an inch of experience knows not to tell a reptile where it's found.

    If you didn't give a midbody count I would've said repens for sure.
     
  10. Waterrat

    Waterrat Almost Legendary

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    People can and people should if the pic is not good enough to make a positive ID - INCLUDING MY PICS I POSTED AND CONFESSED THAT THEY AREN'T GOOD ID SHOTS.
    Isn't it bit unreasonable to post a poor quality pic and expect people to ID the animal?
    No one gets blasted for poor photography as long as they don't expect miracles when it comes to ID.
     
  11. Elapidae1

    Elapidae1 Very Well-Known Member

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    Geck, The few A. pulchella I've seen in Perth metro (hills area) have all been found in stony laterite soil areas, the one pictured was found a couple of hours south of Perth in low lying sandy soil amongst Blackboys, Banksia, eucalyptus with some swampy areas.

    I don't think the bronze over the dorsal area is seen in A. repens, at least not in the repens I have come across.
     
  12. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    Credit where credit is due. It is great to see the positive attitude and help that has developed and the robust discussions without harassing or belittling. Definitely makes one want to join in.

    Blue
     
  13. GeckPhotographer

    GeckPhotographer Very Well-Known Member

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    Both very interesting. For the second point at least that gives a definite advantage in identification to those that have observed the animal regularly, which I obviously haven't all good info to store away.
     
  14. Poggle

    Poggle Very Well-Known Member

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    Ok here is another one.

    850mm Victoria
     

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  15. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    I shall not spoil others fun - an excellent photo.

    Blue
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 28, 2011
  16. Renenet

    Renenet Very Well-Known Member

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    Austrelaps superbus (Lowland copperhead). Why? The reddish sides made me think copperhead. In more detail, the scale patterns on the head that I can see are very similar to other A. superbus, as are the eyes.
     
  17. Waterrat

    Waterrat Almost Legendary

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    Also the white (light colour) edges of supralabials and overall leathery appearance. The scales are not as overlapping as in most other elapids, showing the skin between the scales.
     
  18. Poggle

    Poggle Very Well-Known Member

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    correct and correct
     
  19. eipper

    eipper Very Well-Known Member APS Veteran

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    [​IMG]

    this one is not that tough but what makes it what it is and what separates it from the other two species of the genus it can occur alongside

    Mt Crosby, Queensland
     
  20. Renenet

    Renenet Very Well-Known Member

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    I'm going with Delma torquata because it looks exactly the same as the photo in A Complete Guide to Reptiles of Australia. :)

    Is Delma tincta one of the species it could be mistaken for? Torquata is shorter than tincta, looks stockier and the patterns on the head and neck are much more prominent. The body colour is different too.
     
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