Understanding Identification.

Discussion in 'Reptile and Amphibian Identification' started by Poggle, Dec 19, 2011.

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  1. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    D. plebia is the other possibility. The bands on D. torquata and D. tincta can look almost identical, except for one critical difference...
     
  2. Waterrat

    Waterrat Almost Legendary

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    I throw this in for a good measure.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. eipper

    eipper Very Well-Known Member APS Veteran

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    [​IMG]

    Delma plebia

    [​IMG]

    Delma tincta

    both torquata and plebia have 2 pre anal scales.....and tincta have 3

    torquata have a marbled throat (apparently it can be used for identification of individual specimens)

    The shot up the top was indeed a torquata.


    Cheers,
    Scott
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2011
  4. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    I think I have an advantage with that one Watterat.

    Scott, It was the markings on the throat I was referring to as they were partly visible.

    Blue
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 29, 2011
  5. Renenet

    Renenet Very Well-Known Member

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    Demansia torquata (collared whipsnake). What does "torquata" mean?

    Now I have to figure out how to tell the difference between "legless" lizards and snakes. Ear holes would be one, as would the tongue, but sometimes they're not showing or not clear in pictures. Does anyone know any other ways?
     
  6. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    Renenet,
    Differences between Pygopods and snakes, other than ear opening (if present) are...
    The tongue is flat and broad, not forked.
    There are remnant rear limb flaps (often held close to the body and difficult to see).
    The ventral scales are not broad and expanded but are similar in size to other body scales.
    The tail is at least as long as the body and often much longer, whereas snakes have a much shorter tail, nowhere near as long as he body.

    And "torquata" means "collared" usually in reference to markings around the neck.

    Blue
     
  7. Waterrat

    Waterrat Almost Legendary

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    f...!
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2011
  8. -Peter

    -Peter Guest

    Haha, geriatric moment there Michael.
     
  9. Waterrat

    Waterrat Almost Legendary

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    Yeah. That happens at my age.
    I was thinking about eye lids.
     
  10. Renenet

    Renenet Very Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, Blue.
     
  11. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    The unknown is a Delma... unless you are finding it a bore.
     
  12. saratoga

    saratoga Well-Known Member

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    Yes its definately a Lowland Copperhead...how do I know?? Because I TOOK THE PHOTO!!!

    Would have been nice to acknowledge you were using someone elses image you pinched from the web!
     
  13. raywise

    raywise New Member

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    What is this little fellow we just snapped?

    Hello all, I hope this is ok to post here. Could someone more knowledgeable then me identify this little fellow we just found slithering around the house. Approx 2feet long, very slender, patterned brown. I followed him around the house and then he slithered sideways off the verandah and into the garden. We get a few around here at night, especially when it is stinking hot like it is now, (have to remember to stop walking outside without turning on lights like I always do!)

    Kind Regards
    Ray



    DSCF9278.jpg DSCF9277.jpg DSCF9276.jpg
     
  14. waruikazi

    waruikazi Legendary

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    That's a keeelback champ. Not dangerous at all.
     
  15. raywise

    raywise New Member

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    Cool, thanks. We've had a couple of Keelbacks coming up from the "swamp" down the back before, although they were much larger than this one. He'll have fun in our garden, :)
     
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