Uv lights and fish pebbles

Discussion in 'Herp Help' started by Dvisy, Nov 3, 2018.

  1. Dvisy

    Dvisy New Member

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    Hey everyone!

    I keep seeing conflicting information on this. Do Stimson python's need a UV light? If so what are some good brands? Also, I was watching a youtuber who had snakes the other day and she had them on fish pebbles as bedding. Is this a good bedding for snakes because it looks very nice lol.

    Thank you!
     
  2. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

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    No python "NEEDS" uv, theres no research to say it benefits from them, its pretty much just from display, but u have to turn it on and off at the right times otherwise it can mess with their day/night cycles

    I personally wouldnt recommend anything besides paper, paper litter pellets, or mulch/critter crumble (and the like)/leaf litter
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2018
  3. Neil j

    Neil j Active Member

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    UV lights are not a must imo. Purely for viewing pleasure some believe lights bring out the colour of their snakes. I’m not convinced.
    But perhaps.

    Pebbles may be more trouble then their worth. Having to wash them all the time. I use affordable breeders choice cat litter for spot cleaning or good old news paper replaced routinely, even better butchers paper. The pet shop will have stuff to. Kritters crumble, shredded aspen.

    Highly recommend f10 vet disinfectant for cleaning. That reminds me, I need some.
     
  4. Sdaji

    Sdaji Almost Legendary

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    UV is neither necessary nor beneficial (except to the people selling the gear!). In some cases it can be harmful, and it's always at least a little bit expensive and a hassle.

    I set my first snake enclosure up with aquarium gravel, which was also the last time I ever used it for reptiles. There are various options. Paper is free/cheap and very easy. There are various particulate choices such as hemp, wood shavings (be careful with pine or anything with a significant smell), Breeders Choice, etc. These can all be good and largely comes down to budget any personal preference. Sand is expensive, messy and can be problematic. Some people still use it because it looks good (arguable!) but I see absolutely no practical reason to use it for any Australian snake. Paper is good because it's quick and easy to do a complete clean. Particulate options are good because you can spot clean quickly and easily. Definitely worth experimenting and seeing what works best for you :)
     
  5. Dvisy

    Dvisy New Member

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    Thanks everyone! No UV light and I'm thinking paper towel, at first at least.
     
  6. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Purely optional but if you are at any point handling your python during the week, whilst it's on your arm, step outside into the sunshine for 5 mins. That'll be adequate UVA & UVB exposure for it, whether it's required for health benefits or not. The one benefit of direct sunshine on your python is it will drastically enhance its visual appearance (to you) and allow you to appreciate it in all its glory.
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    Last edited: Nov 4, 2018
    Ropey, dragonlover1 and Dvisy like this.

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