V.indicus and V.indicus "blue phase"

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by CrazyNut, May 20, 2014.

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  1. CrazyNut

    CrazyNut Well-Known Member

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    Hi guys,
    just after you opinions here. Do you think V.indicus and V.indicus "blue phase" should be classed as a different species like V.storri and V.storri ocreatus or do you think they need to be classed as just 2 different colour variations like red V.acanthurus and normal full pattern V.acanthurus?
    Thanks
    kind regards
    CN
     
  2. insitu

    insitu Active Member

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    possibly, seems naturally their separated by an ocean. I actually think the indicus complex is broken up already but i dont know which area the blues here actually come from. whats a full pattern acanthurus? do you mean brachyurus or baritji? insulanicus?
     
  3. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    I know nothing about V. indicus taxonomy. What I do know is that colour alone is not sufficient to warrant even sub-species division. There are only a few genes involved and they have multiple alleles which result in different colours. For example, the Common Tree Snake has several colour phases - grass green, blackish blue, sky blue, black, golden. There are a few other variations on those. Yet they are considered th one species and not different sub-species.

    Where a colour or pattern difference is accompanied by genetically seperate traits to the rest of the population, then subspecies status may well be warranted. Sorry I cannot help you beyond these general comments.

    Blue
     
  4. insitu

    insitu Active Member

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    yes colour and pattern arent enough to split species apart, it is however generally a key way to distinguish which ones you are talking about so instead of saying all the finer points that do separate them from something else we all generally just say "the blue ones".. typically in Australia indicus is green/yellow and black, the blue animals are from Indo, the problem is indicus has for 100's of years been introduced to various areas and islands for the meat and skin trade and this makes it hard to pin variants to specific localities although the blues being isolated from our populations and also having a fairly rounded cross section of tail possibly leads to having Varanus juxtindicus blood crossed into them at some point and im not sure where the blue colour comes from after that, its a complex similar to scalaris and prasinus where pockets of distinct forms exist and mountains of work could be done on them, but yes aussie indicus and blue indicus are possibly already split
     
  5. NicG

    NicG Subscriber Subscriber

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    Apologies for hijacking the thread, but I'm reasonably sure that Common Tree Snakes will eventually be split up into (at least) two categories:
    1) Northern/Golden
    2) Eastern - greens, blues, blacks

    In addition to being a significantly different colour phase, the Goldens have a different (narrower) head shapes and, as far as my research has taken me, will not breed with the any of the Easterns.
     
  6. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    Very interesting stuff, it wasn't until recently that I had seen the golden phase.
     
  7. CrazyNut

    CrazyNut Well-Known Member

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    When I say full patterns acanthurus I mean just a normal patterned rather than the "red acanthurus" which used to be classed as a separate species until DNA work was done and found that the 2 were biologically the same.
    Personally I think they should be classed as the same species, I was just after what other people thought. I believe Varanus storri ocreatus is classed as dif species due to it having longer appendages then Varanus storri (I think, pretty sure I read that somewhere). As far as I'm aware no such differences occur between the blue and the normal indicus.
     
  8. mangrove

    mangrove Not so new Member

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    varanids are a naturally variable group of lizards. I have the greens/yellows, and have seen a couple blues in person and there's not much difference besides the colour really, no need for a new sp or ssp, of course I could be wrong. the real question is what's going with scalaris... or brevicauda even
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2014
  9. insitu

    insitu Active Member

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    my apologies, i think im more confused now than i was before
     
  10. geckodan

    geckodan Very Well-Known Member

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    The blue is simply a recessive colour mutation of the typical wild animal.
     
  11. Mr.Self-destruct

    Mr.Self-destruct New Member

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    I assume you're talking about the variation in V. indicus up north. If that is the case don't be surprised to see V. doreanus being listed as being native to Australia. There is considerable talk about them already being here and the Qld museum has in its collections a V. doreanus collected by a German fellow some time back up on cape york. Further to this is you go to iron range national park there are signs there of V. indicus which are clearly V. doreanus. The difficulty is getting someone with the funding and the time to go up there and catch an extremely elusive semi aquatic lizard in an area where field work is restricted to 6 months of the year and then definitively prove to a very stubborn colleagues that you have in fact proven that another species of monitor lives here.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2014
  12. insitu

    insitu Active Member

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    chilli beach
     
  13. CrazyNut

    CrazyNut Well-Known Member

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    yeh that was what is was talking about but they are certainly not Doreanus.
     
  14. insitu

    insitu Active Member

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    as far as i remember there is at least 8 and possibly now over 10 species in the V indicus complex, doreanus is in Australian waters, the one Danny supposedly found in chilli beach is the only specimen iv heard of found on the mainland and being possibly more of a highland species avoiding the coast lines id say it doesnt belong near the beach and possibly shouldnt have been there, but i dont know a lot about that story, many people have claimed to have also found prasinus on the mainland in iron range but we are all yet to see it or even a photo of it, the blue form being recessive could be possible by all means but while the majority of species in PNG and surrounds are typically blue in colour and were heavily exploited for the pet trade id lean further towards their origins being the same as the majority of chondros we have in collections today, really though at the end of the day it doesnt matter what colour it is if you really want to work out if its a different species you need to work out its origins and original locality, in aus, in the wild all the animals here are indicus (although i do seem to feel like i remember them being listed under something else now) either way here they are all the same species in the bush
     
  15. DanN

    DanN Well-Known Member

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    Attached is a "great" photo of V. doreanus from near the tip of CYP. I see them fairly regularly, and they appear to be the same beast that we were calling dorenaus in southern New Guinea (different to indicus, with lots of blue). Very difficult to get close to (as evidenced by the photo...). Others have better pictures from around Lockhart.

    Dan
     

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  16. Mr.Self-destruct

    Mr.Self-destruct New Member

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    I wouldn't be too certain about that. Considering there was once a massive landbridge between us and PNG and the fact that we share such a wide range of fauna (Even shared rivers) it would be downright silly to write off a lizard within a species complex (IE. not sure what you are) to definitely not being a species found just over on a neighboring and only recently (geologically) distinct landmass.
     
  17. The_Phantom

    The_Phantom Not so new Member

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    there's a lot more work needing to be done on these goannas.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2014
  18. insitu

    insitu Active Member

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    it really comes down to their ecological relationships, theres reasons we dont see orientalis and tristis sharing the same ecosystem, same as scalaris and pellewensis, same as prasinus and keithorni, diamonds and carpets, panoptes and rubidus, each has direct access to both habitats but one takes the place of another. we have many undescribed sub species and undescribed monitors at species level so its not impossible at all but i will remain skeptical until i see some form of proof other than storys of them being seen. as far as species complexes sharing both regions, our adders are different to theirs, our bluetongues are and our kinghorni, chondros, subglobosa, scalaris, etc etc i dont see why indicus wouldnt be
     
  19. geckodan

    geckodan Very Well-Known Member

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    The animals I was referring to as "blue" was the blue mutation of Varanus indicus.

    V. doreanus is a separate issue - there are now three verified specimens in the Qld museum (verified by Valter Weijola) from Cape York so there is no question at all as to whether or not they exist in Australia.
     
  20. CrazyNut

    CrazyNut Well-Known Member

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    pretty use this is not Doreanus... Though I won't disagree with you, there is a large chance there are specimens that are not indicus
    View attachment 309929
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2014
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