Ways to calm a snappy snake

Discussion in 'Herp Help' started by becwatson14, May 2, 2014.

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  1. becwatson14

    becwatson14 Not so new Member

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    Hey guys I have a snappy female 4 ish month old coastal/orange pepper jag, she always has her mouth open and strikes at anything that moves in the slightest and I'm after some tips on how to tame her down to be a nice handling snake

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  2. PDM_Pythons

    PDM_Pythons Not so new Member

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    Let her settle for few months ... Will get used to u feeding and disturbing while cleaning out but if the snake is that bad leave it at that for now.... As months go past u should see a calmer snake then is the time to start hooking out and slow handling sessions... ( to many people rush into handling with a nervous hatchie)
     
  3. ThatGuy

    ThatGuy Not so new Member

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    Check for anything that might be causing your jag to be stressed. The most important thing is to make sure that the temperatures are appropriate, make sure that the only time you interact with it is when you feed it for the time being and also make sure that it has a place to retreat from the outside world (A hide at the warm and ambient ends for example). To avoid being bitten use feeding tongs to feed the snake and feed it at the same time of day on feeding days. Providing everything else is right it should calm down after a while, by that I mean weeks maybe months. You will need to be patient.

    When it has calmed down it may associate the door to it's enclosure being opened to feeding time, you should be able to avoid being bitten by using a snake hook to remove it, make sure it knows you are there by gently prodding it with the hook to get its attention and then gently use the hook to guide the snake toward the entrance. You should be able to place a hand under its body by this point and it will grow in comfort toward handling as it learns you mean it no harm.

    Try not to handle directly before feeding, while digesting, during a slough, while in brumation.
    Also try not to over-handle as this can cause the snake stress.

    Any thing I missed I am sure another member of the forums will be able to help with.
     
  4. Trimeresurus

    Trimeresurus Guest

    You should probably just leave it be and see if it settles on it's own, keep it in a secluded low traffic area - jags don't deal well with stress, can send them loopy, if they aren't already.
     
  5. Gizmo101

    Gizmo101 Donator Donator

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    Leaving it until it settles is definitely the way to go.
    Then when you do try to handle it, move with confidence. Reasonable quickly but smoothly so you can get the snake relaxed faster but Going at it a bullet a gate won't help, but then being edgy isn't going to be of any advant age either.
     
  6. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    How long have you had the snake? If you have had it a while, has this behaviour developed recently? If this is the case, what has changed in the snake’s total environment or in your routine with it? You are looking for what has changed that has triggered this behaviour.

    Is this is a recent acquisition? Was it like this for the person who got from? If not, what is different between what the previous owner was doing compared to what you are doing?


    It sounds like the snake might be stressed. There are a number of things that can cause this. Some have already been addressed. If these are causative factors and you correct them, then behavioural change should be evident within a couple of weeks. Bear in mind that the problem might well be a combination of factors, all of which need to be addressed to achieve change.


    A most common factor causing stress at that age is having too large an enclosure and/or the lack of a secure hide or perch. In their first year or so snakes are kept in click-clacks for a good reason. In the wild they are on the menu of most carnivores, including other snakes. So they spend their first year or so trying to avoid being eaten while attempting to get sufficient food to grow large enough to turn the tables on their would-be predators. A clear plastic click-clack that allows vision in all directions might be the problem. It makes them feel exposed and therefore vulnerable and this is what stresses them. A coat of black poster paint on each face of the container can fix that. To check first, place the container in a larger cardboard box which will block all outward vision but still allow adequate air flow. A couple of weeks in this will result in calmer behaviour if this is the root cause of the problem.


    A couple of wooden chopsticks 1cm apart and just below the top, positioned towards the warmer end of the click-clack, will provide a secure perch. At least two hides should be provided, one at the cooler end and one at around their average preferred body temperature of about 29[SUP]o[/SUP]C. Hides should be tight and cosy as this enables them to conserve heat and humidity. For young snakes small pill boxes or jewellery boxes are the way to go. Certainly nothing bigger that a cigarette packet. What you might think is cramped is likely to be ideal for a small snake.


    Many snakes do not like the feel of human hands on them and take a while to get use to it. To overcome this, using pillow slips as gloves will help. With time, one pillow slip can be removed and the snake given the opportunity to climb over bare human skin. Do not rush it but you should eventually reach the point where the pillowslips are no longer required (technique compliments of Longqi).


    Blue

     
  7. becwatson14

    becwatson14 Not so new Member

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    I just got her, she is in a tub, she came from a breeder who the only time the tub was open was to feed her and clean tub

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  8. pinefamily

    pinefamily Donator Donator

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    Then the advice given above will work fine. Feed and clean, otherwise leave the snake alone for a week or two to settle, then handle gradually.
     
  9. becwatson14

    becwatson14 Not so new Member

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    Are there other methods/ ways to handle or hold her that will calm her more? Ways that might make her realize I'm not a threat. . I also have her brother who was un handled but he is a dream no strike or bite


    [​IMG][​IMG]


    That's her


    [​IMG]

    This is her brother docile as anything
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 3, 2014
  10. Beans

    Beans Guest

    Shes stressing out. Stop handling her at all and leave her alone.

    Look at her poor little face when you are trying to take her off her comfy perch. :( Just leave her.
     
  11. Trimeresurus

    Trimeresurus Guest

    Tipping this one will develop some neuro issues later on.
     
  12. dodgie

    dodgie Well-Known Member

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    Snakes don't tame down but will get used to being handled from time to time there all individuals some are ok to deal with and others not so much.If the caging and temps are ok just let it be.

    Even the most placid snake will bite for no reason.
     
  13. Senator358

    Senator358 Well-Known Member

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    As [MENTION=32210]Trimeresurus[/MENTION] said. Leave it alone completely or it will definitely develop neuro
     
  14. Tigerlily

    Tigerlily Active Member

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    [MENTION=38031]becwatson14[/MENTION] I really like the method that this lady uses:

    Taming / Calming A Nippy, Defensive, Baby Snake - YouTube

    I agree with the others not to force the snake off if she's wrapped around something. I know it's frustrating but you're just making the process more difficult and reinforcing to the snake that you=scary. Maybe take out the grid for a while and just keep a few climbable branches in there, feed her on them like the video says, handle the branches yourself so she can accept your scent in her home, then one day when she's on one you can just pick it up and take it SLOWLY from there... My snake is not at all a biter or cage defensive but he is just a baby and a bit shy so I use her method; I never pick him up myself unless he's in a position where I can easily and gently scoop him up - I just started this "stick training" last Thursday and I've already seen a pretty big change in his mannerisms. You'll need to be patient though and not rush things.

    Some tips:

    No sudden movements
    Don't put your hand above or in front of her face - always offer your palm from below
    If the snake freezes or flinches, stop and wait until it starts to move again
    Keep the enclosure in a place where the snake can watch you, occasionally go up to the cage while it's active and then go away without opening the lid or messing with it
    DON'T force it out of the enclosure

    ...that was my 2cents coming from someone whose experience in "taming" is mainly with birds and small mammals; this is the first hatchie python that I'm "taming" myself so obviously next to zero experience - please take with a grain of salt! Just thought I'd share the video because it made a lot of sense to me. Good luck! Just remember not to force the snake, keep all stress to a minimum and have PATIENCE, that's the most important thing :)
     
  15. Beans

    Beans Guest

    I agree, put the cage in a place where the snake can see you going about your buisness. Mine is in my room beside the computer, she comes out watches me etc.
     
  16. Richie_Jenkins

    Richie_Jenkins New Member

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    just keep handling it until she finds out you are not trying to hurt her and where gloves if biting bothers you alot.:)
     
  17. PDM_Pythons

    PDM_Pythons Not so new Member

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    And stress it out more than it already is
     
  18. dodgie

    dodgie Well-Known Member

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    Mate she won't get used to being handled.Some snakes a better to handle than others.Strees can put snakes off there food and then the problems begin.
     
  19. Beans

    Beans Guest

    That is a horrible idea. Don't force your snake to like being handled, thats a really good way for it to hate it even more and stress it out so much that it could go off feed.

    As others have said. Keep handling sessions short and sweet. Make sure its a positive experience. Take it out while its on a branch then let it do what it wants when out. Do not force it to do anything.

    As for you Richie, don't offer advice like that. Just shh and learn for while.
     
  20. canidaevulpes

    canidaevulpes Not so new Member

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    No need to bother with advice... She obviously didn't like the advise she was given here to leave it alone so she took to Facebook where she was given, in my opinion, terrible advice which will ultimately stress the snake. Poor little thing, jags+stress=neuro.
     
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