Western Netted Dragon - shed?

Discussion in 'Australian Lizards and Monitors' started by Cherie_Zero, Oct 4, 2018.

  1. Cherie_Zero

    Cherie_Zero New Member

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    I have had 2 Western Netted Dragons for about 3 months now (first time reptile owner). Around a month and a half ago they both started shedding. One of the dragons completed his shed within a few weeks but the other one has the same patchy face and patch on tail for nearly a month with no change.

    The books I have aren't much help with information on shedding and there is not much information about Netted Dragons on the internet. I did see some information about Bearded Dragons saying that the shed takes a couple of weeks so I am a bit concerned. Do I need to get him looked at?
    IMG_6942.JPG IMG_6833.jpg

    -edit. Sorry, I probably should have posted this in the help forum
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2018
  2. dragonlover1

    dragonlover1 Subscriber Subscriber

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    It shouldn't take a month to shed,I have central netted dragons in my collection and they never have a problem. Do they have a water bowl to soak in? You could try a warm bath or misting them occasionally.
     
  3. Cherie_Zero

    Cherie_Zero New Member

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    Thanks for the reply, confirming my suspicion that it has taken too long. I mist regularly and have been giving him warm baths since the shedding started. In the first few weeks there was noticeable changes to the shed but there has been no change to his face or tail since.
     
  4. Nero Egernia

    Nero Egernia Subscriber Subscriber

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    I used to keep and breed Western Netted Dragons.

    Sounds like both of your little dragons are taking too long to shed. The old skin quite literally falls away in pieces (I used to have a photo that illustrated this, but I lost it when my computer crashed), and it's often a rapid deed. Usually over a couple of days, although it's not uncommon for them to shed the majority, if not all, of their skin in a single day. It doesn't typically linger like Bearded Dragons. Are they hydrated enough? Have you provided them with the opportunity to burrow in moist sand?
     
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  5. GBWhite

    GBWhite Well-Known Member

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    Hi Cherie

    Shedding problems with dragons are usually associated with husbandry issues that contribute towards dehydration or a vitamin deficiency in their diet.

    If housing conditions are met and maintained correctly then there should not be any reason to mist the critters in the immediate period leading up to shedding. Dysecdysis (improper or incomplete shedding) is more than often a result of the reptile being dehydrated in general. As mentioned above it can be beneficial to provide a shallow bowl to allow the critters the opportunity soak and also moist sand to allow them to burrow as a means to remain hydrated but another more important consideration is to be absolutely certain they are drinking. Don't assume that they are drinking just because a water bowl is provided in their enclosure. Some dragons are reluctant to drink from standing water and it's often advised to lightly drip or spray fresh water over their heads and/or on the sides of the enclosure on a regular basis to encourage them to drink . This way they will drink the water as it rolls off their heads and passes over their lips and also lick the droplets as they roll down the side of their enclosure or cage furnishings. Another consideration is a lack of cage furnishings that provide a rough surface for the lizard to rub against during a shed.

    Another but less common problem associated with dysecdysis in insectivorous lizards are low levels of Vitamin A in their diet. Maybe one of our members who are experienced with this species may be able to provide suggestions in regard to this.

    You could try removing the stuck shed by generously soaking the old skin and very, very, very gently rubbing it with a super soft toothbrush or paper towel.

    Hope this helps.

    George.
     
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  6. Cherie_Zero

    Cherie_Zero New Member

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    Thank you for your comments, advice & suggestions.

    He has a large water dish which is deep enough swim in (but not enough to drown). I give him a mist every day but I will try putting some droplets onto his head.

    The substrate is desert sand (not my preference but that’s what they were living in prior so we stayed with it). It is quite dry though, I’m going to add water to the sand and use a hoe to ensure it is more moist. He doesn’t spend a lot of time of the ground though, he prefers to stay on the logs and vines.

    I had been giving him a quick warm bath once a week but I will try do that more regularly until this is under control.

    They eat a diet of crickets (which are fed spinach) with calcium powder every second feed.

    55281616-B71B-4BE3-AF07-9CBA10901965.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2018
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  7. dragonlover1

    dragonlover1 Subscriber Subscriber

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    There is nothing wrong with desert sand as long as it is REAL desert sand.So many fake types out there.Real fine powdery sand is no good because it sets like cement when wet.Calci sand is the same and causes impaction.
     
  8. Cherie_Zero

    Cherie_Zero New Member

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    I have been bathing him every day for 5 days now and rubbing him with a soft toothbrush.

    I have been adding warm water to the sand to try increase the humidity and give the sand some moisture.

    I also tried encouraging him to drink as suggested. I have discovered that he doesn’t mind drinking from a dripper if I drip droplets in front of his face.

    The scales in his tail appear to have loosened a bit so I will keep it up and hopefully it will keep improving

    D2518FDE-05B2-4FF4-BBB2-40E2BA718BC6.jpeg
     
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  9. dragonlover1

    dragonlover1 Subscriber Subscriber

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    sounds like you're on the right track ,as Egernia suggested some moist sand might be needed
     
  10. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

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    Use a spray bottle and spray the side of his mouth with tepid water on a gentle spray (not a mist, but u also don’t want to blast him away) our work blue tongue won’t drink at all from water bowl, but will happily drink from a jet of water for 10-15minutes daily
     

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