What can you tell me about Blue tongues?

Discussion in 'General Reptile Discussion' started by Flaviemys purvisi, Jan 28, 2018.

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  1. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    I've also got Shepherd's mate, grew up with them all my life, Jacks and shepherd's are (as far as I'm concerned) the 2 toughest dog breeds on the planet... If a Jack was the same size as a shepherd though, the shepherd would cop a freaking towelling... Check this out... (Not my video but pretty much exactly how it is...) Read the comments. LOL
     
  2. Nero Egernia

    Nero Egernia Subscriber Subscriber

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    That's a poor attitude to have. It's not dissimilar to irresponsible cat owners allowing their pets to free roam. Excuses that "killing things is part of their nature" is no reason to allow your pet to kill wildlife. Seeing as it's near impossible to train cats the only solution is to confine them indoors or in a cat run. Dogs can be trained, however. Or at the very least only allow them into the yard while under supervision. It sounds as though your dogs will attack and kill any small creatures that crosses their paths. That's the impression I get when I read such posts.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2018
  3. cement

    cement Subscriber Subscriber APS Veteran

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    I had a neighbour whose jack Russell used to roam, he was a lovely dog, but I occasionally have snakes out on my lawn. he was quite easily trained to leave then alone, and we never had an issue. I could confidently have snakes out while he was around.
    it is possible to train them, and I highly recommend it, I know of two jack Russells killed by black snakes last season. I caught and removed one of the snakes, I got it on the second call out, and thought it would have had an injury, but it was uninjured.
     
  4. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    I'm not going to argue with you about a hunting breed that has been bred for hundreds of years to hunt, and mine ARE working dogs that are used on foxes, wild dogs and feral cats and pigs...

    Tracking wild dogs in the Sunny coast hinterland.
    20150104_075449_resized.jpeg

    A Jack's nature is very hard to explain to someone who's never kept them before. The key to Jacks is daily exercise and allowing them to burn off that endless energy. I run mine 5km twice daily and give them all the stimulation they need. If you wish to label me an irresponsible pet owner, well that's just a ridiculous misinformed statement.. If you knew anything about the breed you would know that confining them indoors is not an option, not every breed is a mopey lapdog like a King Charles Cavalier hence why I've restricted their access to the rear of the block only and not the front as well, There are further means I can take (as mentioned I will run an electric wire along the garden beds where I know the blueys frequent) The Jacks know what the electric wire means and will steer clear of it.
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Jan 29, 2018, Original Post Date: Jan 29, 2018 ---
    That's awesome mate, but my Jacks don't roam (they're in their own yard) and one Jack Russell isn't the same as a pack of them... The last Brown they got would be over a year ago now and it was in 9 pieces, (I won't post those pics up)... Haven't lost one yet. The odds are stacked highly in a Jack's favour when it comes to snake encounters. Given where I currently live and the fact I have 2 small daughters who regularly play out in the back yard and gardens, the Jacks are there to look after them too. I'll take my dogs getting a snake before my daughters wind up accidentally bit looking for their ball in the garden any day... my kid's aren't plonked in front of the TV or X-box all day like most today are... They actually go outside and get dirty. I would happily stop snakes from getting into my yard (but those snake repellers are garbage) rather than trying to stop the Jacks from doing their job... Protecting.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2018
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  5. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

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    If you can't let your dogs off their leads "for obvious reason" as stated by yourself, you shouldn't be at an off leash dog beach. Also if you weren't at fault then why were you escorted off the beach and not the other way around? Doesn't really make sense.
     
  6. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Makes plenty of sense, Jacks' are unsociable when approached by other dogs and I was doing the right thing. Off leash means its permitted not a requirement/condition of entry.. I asked to be escorted off the beach and back to my vehicle so I had witness. Also, the police lodged a formal complaint with the Noosa Council over those involved and their dogs behaviour. I was contacted by Noosa Council the same day and asked to submit a report and include a veterinary report also if my animals were injured, (which they were not). She was apparently issued with an infringement and a fine as your dogs are allowed off-leash on the beach so long as they do not interfere with other beach-goers and their animals.
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Jan 29, 2018, Original Post Date: Jan 29, 2018 ---
    Yeah mate, no fear, no limits... Check out this leap of faith... Lure training off the waterfall into the backyard pool...
    2016-01-06_19.25.50.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2018
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  7. Buggster

    Buggster Well-Known Member

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    It would be a terrifying world if jacks were any bigger than they were. My girl copped it from a little foxy who was 12, half blind and deaf and probably 1/5 of her size. Hilarious watching this tiny dog whip a giant shepherds butt.


    I’m sorry I didn’t train my dog better when I was 3?

    And with the current dogs it’s not a huge issue- they’ll go after rats (and fail) but will generally leave everything alone (or only chase it from their yard). But if something were to come into their yard, I wouldn’t be overly upset if they did kill it. They’re shepherds, they want to ‘protect’ their home and I don’t want to train that out of them (if that’s even possible...). If something comes into their home, it’s fair game- much like if a skink decided the cat run looked like a good home. Would you blame the cat for killing a skink inside the cat run?

    The worst they’ve gotten has been a rat- and we’ve had a few very near misses with the neighbours cat. But they’re inside at night so possum have free run of the yard, and during the day they leave thr lizards and turkeys alone. Well... not completely- we used to have Australorps and my girl keeps trying to herd the turkeys into the chicken coop, but she’s a shepherd who’s grown up with chooks, she’s not likely to touch something that looks like a chook...
     
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  8. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    I agree mate, rather than trying to manipulate my dog's behaviour and turn them into useless good for nothing layabouts, I much rather keep them the way they are BUT at the same time take alternative measures to provide a safe haven/passage for any encroaching wildlife. This is far more practical and desirable for my personal situation.

    Last thing I want is a pack of Jacks tearing through the scrub after a pig or fox and smell a snake and come running out yelping like scolded poodles.
     
  9. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

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    They may have been used for hunting for hundreds of years, but they still need to be taught to hunt. It isn't something that just happens. It is similar to Pitbulls that get labelled as a 'fighting dog'.
    They aren't born to fight and are therefore aggresive, it is something that is taught to them.
    Just like Jacks and hunting, once taught they do enjoy it but it isn't something that comes naturally with birth.
     
  10. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

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    I don’t understand this one bit. My uncles friend breeds bull Arabs and gave one to my uncle at 3months old, once he reached about a year old he started “pointing” and barking at animals in the trees of the Bush behind their house that you wouldn’t see unless u had binoculars . No training required. Just instinct

    Meanwhile my Boston terrier wouldn’t touch a fly and would rather lick a kitten.
     
  11. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    You clearly don't know anything about Jacks. Lol
     
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  12. vampstorso

    vampstorso Very Well-Known Member

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    It seems the main reason a Jack would "win" against a larger dog is simply the larger being less aggressive, following command with better behaviour, or confused.

    Many times small dogs started on my American bulldog. She would ignore them, look at them puzzled and back off.
    A dog of similar or larger size started on her, and she'd go in to end them unless told otherwise. Totally left other species alone.

    She never started anything but she'd finish it.
    Not a trait I loved nor trained, she came from a hoarding situation after being dumped as a puppy which I believe lead to that.




    Regarding instinct,
    I must say I've never really seen instinct in a dog the majority of the time.
    But my mind was changed just a week ago.
    Brought home an 8 week old Maremma who instantly guarded the kids, and lays at the perimeter, puts herself back in the yard and won't cross half way down the driveway. She fascinates me.
     
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  13. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

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    They are still a dog. A Shepard isn't a security dog until trained, a Labrador isn't a guide dog until trained.
    As most dogs do unless trained not to, Jacks will chase something for fun but won't be a hunter unless trained to do so.
    I had a Pitbull that would point and fixate on things but this was encouraged by me with tone, excitement in my voice and words like "what's that" and is not something that came naturally.
     
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  14. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Definitely disagree with that 100%
    Again... you clearly know nothing about Jack's... your comments are poiintless.
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Jan 29, 2018, Original Post Date: Jan 29, 2018 ---
    fortunately there's not many larger dogs stupid enough to take on the wrath of a Jack. My boy has been into a bull terrier,, staffy's, burmese mountain dog, greyhound, german shepherd, bull mastiff, dalmatioon, golden retriever, and several others all many times his size... the thing is, Jack's do not know they're small, they're bred bold and fearless.. take a look on YouTube, you can see them used to take on lions, cheetahs, bears... doesn't matter what it is, that's why they're so popular and why I love them... I've had many large dogs but at some point they've all known fear... Jack's know no fear, if you jumped off a cliff, your Jack would jump with you. Best dogs going. 7.5 kilos of heart. Loyal companions, fearless protectors. Complete package.
    20170618_165920.jpg
     
  15. vampstorso

    vampstorso Very Well-Known Member

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    Sounds good. Great you enjoy your dogs so much.

    I admit to being bias and favour large dogs, so my views will be far from balanced.
     
  16. Imported_tuatara

    Imported_tuatara Well-Known Member

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    I love large dogs, I dislike small ones. Of any dogs I'd either get an Irish wolfhound or Chinese crested.
     
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  17. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    That's totally cool, I'm biased too, we all are... I have large shepherds and Jacks, I keep them both so I love them both... I just know who wears the pants from experience that's all. lol
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Jan 29, 2018, Original Post Date: Jan 29, 2018 ---
    I never thought I'd own small dogs, always thought they were useless, my wife changed that when I met her Jacks, now I'm all for Jacks... they're just so gutsy. Don't get me wrong, I'd never own a pomeranian or chihuahua or those pugs and crap like that LOL
     
  18. Imported_tuatara

    Imported_tuatara Well-Known Member

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    I worded that wrongly, I dislike keeping small dogs usually. i don't mind them in general other than very little dogs like chihuahuas. Chihuahuas are the scariest things ever.
     
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  19. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Chihuahuas talk a big game but then they can't back it up.
     
  20. Buggster

    Buggster Well-Known Member

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    I’ll believe this when you teach a border collie to hunt or a bloodhound to herd.
    Breeds have natural instincts to do what they were bred for (you’ll often see collies ‘herding’, pointers ‘pointing’, hounds ‘tracking’, shepherds ‘guarding’ and so on... without any training whatsoever.)

    You train the ‘command’ in order to refine it, control it and/or modify it to suit your needs.

    So a trained security dog might be taught to bite arms and ‘take down’ an intruder, while my girl will bark and bite whatever she feels like biting.

    A Labrador isn’t a ‘natural’ guide dog- thus why they must have extensive training to be made guide dogs (they are retrievers after all...). And FYI it was the GSD who was the first guide dogs, but they were eventually disused as they have a higher aggression than Labs.

    Jacks can take on anything and everything because that’s how they were bred. It’s in their genetic code to be little nutters. High drive, high pain tolerance, high determination, low fear... in all a little dog who thinks he’s a lion. They won’t look before they leap because that’s how’re they’re bred (because a dog has to be pretty insane to take on a predator twice their size as they were bred to).


    To reply to vamp’s statement of a bulldog who won’t bother with small dogs, again, how they were bred to be. They’re bred to hang off bulls, not bother with rabbits. They don’t have a very high prey drive at all so a small dog is hardly a bother to them.


    And to bring up the pitbull debate (oh boy, here we go...).
    The American Pitbull Terrier was a born fighting dog. High aggression, high drive, high determination, high pain tolerance... they were not bred as ‘pet’ dogs. No one in their right mind would want one as a pet- they were bred to kill and kill and kill. Most ‘pitbulls’ around today are staffy mutts- and no one in Aus has a ‘real’ APBT- any I’ve seen are staffyx, amstaffx, bulldogx or mastiffx. I’m willing to bet over 90% of ‘pitbulls’ don’t have a single drop of real APBT blood in them.
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Jan 29, 2018, Original Post Date: Jan 29, 2018 ---
    I work with GSDs including handler aggressive rescue dogs.

    Only dogs I’ve ever been bitten by was a spaniel, chi, and some Maltese mix. And the neighbours shiba has a thing about biting my shoes...
     
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