What can you use this for?

Discussion in 'DIY Zone' started by Bl69aze, Feb 20, 2018.

  1. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
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    Used to house a children’s python a while ago in it (not mine) but just wondering if it’s worth keeping for any worthwhile lizards or sneks or to sell it
     
  2. Foozil

    Foozil Well-Known Member

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    Baby v. gilleni or tristis?
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2018
  3. Imported_tuatara

    Imported_tuatara Well-Known Member

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    i'd say no to monitors, they grow rather fast. Some sort of gecko would be what i'd use it for, though i don't know the size.
     
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  4. Foozil

    Foozil Well-Known Member

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    For a gilleni it would be fine, they do grow fast but don't get too big
     
  5. Imported_tuatara

    Imported_tuatara Well-Known Member

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  6. cris

    cris Almost Legendary

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    What are the dimensions? I'm not a fan of keeping fast lizards in enclosures with sliding doors and it does not appear to be built to suit the heating requirements of a monitor without a bit of work. Not sure what repiltes you are interested in but many could be kept in that sort of enclosure, especially considering species where it would be suitable for juveniles.
     
  7. SpottedPythons

    SpottedPythons Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure a gillens would be happy in that... they are pretty active and can get to about palm sized.
     
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  8. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    With a few mods to allow a bit more ventilation from the side, That enclosure would suit Extatosoma tiaratum, commonly known as the giant prickly stick insect or the spiny leaf insect.
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    I don't know if you're into phasmids or inverts at all, I am. I keep T's, scorps, pedes, giant burrowing roaches and a heap of other spiders from red-backs, trapdoors, funnel-webs, etc.

    Inverts aside, a couple of specimens of a very small arboreal species of frog would be OK.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2018
  9. Imported_tuatara

    Imported_tuatara Well-Known Member

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    some eastern dwarfs would be relatively okay i'm pretty sure.
     
  10. Murph_BTK

    Murph_BTK Well-Known Member

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    BIRD EATING SPIDER, would be perfect
     
  11. Pauls_Pythons

    Pauls_Pythons Subscriber Subscriber Power Seller

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    Young Diamond python
     
  12. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Bird eating spiders are obligate burrowers... with those sliding doors going right to the very bottom of the enclosure, there's not the available space to give a good depth for a T to burrow. I keep all my T's in the largest sized critter keepers, filled the the brim with coir peat mixed with sphagnum moss for them to create their burrows. They only need a physical space (area) twice the size of their leg-span, you can literally keep them happy in a large pickle jar, it's the depth they need though to burrow deep.

    My SP2 exits its burrow to take a woody at feeding time.
    20170913_165243.jpg
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    That sized enclosure would be too hard to maintain the appropriate constant temp of 26 degrees and high humidity necessary for a T to breathe properly through its book lungs and to shed successfully. Unlike reptiles who can survive stuck sheds, and be assisted if necessary, if a T has a failed moult, it dies. Even if just a leg is caught. I keep all my T's as mentioned in critter keepers, inside one of my turtle egg incubators set at 26 degrees. I've some now with 15cm leg-spans that I've raised since they were slings (spiderlings) this size >o< and at that size they were kept in camera film canisters and fed pin-head crickets.
     
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  13. Murph_BTK

    Murph_BTK Well-Known Member

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    ^^^ my bad

    Instagram: murph_BTK
     
  14. dragonlover1

    dragonlover1 Subscriber Subscriber

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    NO too small for a Gillens,ours is in a 3';monitors are an active creature and need room to run around
     
  15. cris

    cris Almost Legendary

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    Sorry misread, I thought you meant your lizard was 3'. You can fit a lot of habitat into a small area, depends on how many floors, branches, tunnels, digging space etc. is available.
     
  16. Foozil

    Foozil Well-Known Member

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    I'm not saying an adult I'm just saying a baby until it grows up a bit.
     
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  17. Imported_tuatara

    Imported_tuatara Well-Known Member

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    as i said, they do grow fast..¯\_(ツ)_/¯
     
  18. Foozil

    Foozil Well-Known Member

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    I stand by my statement :)
     
  19. SpottedPythons

    SpottedPythons Well-Known Member

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    ??? Thought you said that adult gillen's don't get too big...

    I really think you shouldn't house any sort of monitor in there unless you have ready a larger enclosure. I'd suggest maybe an arboreal gecko for that setup, or maybe some frogs.
     
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  20. Foozil

    Foozil Well-Known Member

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    I meant that if they don't get too big they would take longer to get to a size where they wouldn't fit in that enclosure. Adult gillens can thrive in enclosures only a bit bigger than this one.

    Edit: Looks like even adults would be fine in there...
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2018

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