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What snake do you think has the most personality

BrettJ

Not so new Member
I have an Olive Python whom I think has a lot of personality. Very curious snake. Inspects everything i do in enclosure from filling water bowl to spot cleaning. He has a kink in the spine so he looks a bit odd and although it is there he has normal movement.
If I enter my reptile room he will often just stick his head out from where ever he is and seems to watch me cleaning other enclosures in the old rope scope position.
This boy gives me so much entertainment especially at feeding times. Strikes and wraps at a phenomenal speed then he cannot find the pointy end of any prey for extended periods.
I will then often carefully present the head and he will calmly start the ingestion just like when i hand feed my dog.. At the same time i am weary of him because getting bitten by him would be quite the painful experience he has a few particularly large teeth !
 

Sdaji

Almost Legendary
APS Veteran
Trusted Seller
Coastal Taipans win hands down among Australian snakes, although few will ever keep them.

Among Pythons (the only snakes which will ever be largely popular in Australia), it's a real case of apples and oranges, but Waters, Olives and Scrubbies rank high, Antaresia are very underrated, Womas and Black-headeds are utter morons but have crazy attitudes which make them comical in a way you could sort of call personality, and at the shallow end of the personality pool there are Carpets, but people love them so will project personality on to them and believe they're full of it, regardless of how lacking they are.

The majority of keepers actually like snakes with as little personality as popular, highlighted by the world's most popular snake (the Ball Python) having an utterly dismal personality, hence the memes mocking Ball Python keepers. Working with Ball Pythons (in Asia and the USA) has been among my most horrible experiences while abroad.
 

Telluric

New Member
Coastal Taipans win hands down among Australian snakes, although few will ever keep them.

Among Pythons (the only snakes which will ever be largely popular in Australia), it's a real case of apples and oranges, but Waters, Olives and Scrubbies rank high, Antaresia are very underrated, Womas and Black-headeds are utter morons but have crazy attitudes which make them comical in a way you could sort of call personality, and at the shallow end of the personality pool there are Carpets, but people love them so will project personality on to them and believe they're full of it, regardless of how lacking they are.

The majority of keepers actually like snakes with as little personality as popular, highlighted by the world's most popular snake (the Ball Python) having an utterly dismal personality, hence the memes mocking Ball Python keepers. Working with Ball Pythons (in Asia and the USA) has been among my most horrible experiences while abroad.
I totally agree with Sdaji - I have a 2 year old Woma who just has endless curiosity, a big desire to explore and totally unjustified confidence, which I suspect is due to her um, being a bit of a moron as you put it hahah. This often ends up with her in comical places and situation. She comes out to free roam the house almost every day for a couple of hours, and she always watches when you're doing something. She also frequently knocks things over, climbs surfaces that can't actually support her weight and has even learned recently that if she tries hard enough, she can climb onto the kitchen bench. Very big 'personality'.

My 1 year old Darwin Carpet Python on the other hand, is very happy to sit in his hide or under his basking lamp for the entire day. If I didn't take him out for exercise, he'd be happy doing very little at all!

I brought home my first Antaresia hatchling one week ago, and I can already tell by the way he's scooting curiously around his click clack tub that he's going to be spicy - as a breeder of these little guys, what quirks do you enjoy about them? Are they are curious and active (and as bad at climbing) as womas? I can find plenty of research online about husbandry, feeding, growth etc, but it's much harder to find objective information on snake personalities. ;)
 

Sdaji

Almost Legendary
APS Veteran
Trusted Seller
I totally agree with Sdaji - I have a 2 year old Woma who just has endless curiosity, a big desire to explore and totally unjustified confidence, which I suspect is due to her um, being a bit of a moron as you put it hahah. This often ends up with her in comical places and situation. She comes out to free roam the house almost every day for a couple of hours, and she always watches when you're doing something. She also frequently knocks things over, climbs surfaces that can't actually support her weight and has even learned recently that if she tries hard enough, she can climb onto the kitchen bench. Very big 'personality'.

My 1 year old Darwin Carpet Python on the other hand, is very happy to sit in his hide or under his basking lamp for the entire day. If I didn't take him out for exercise, he'd be happy doing very little at all!

I brought home my first Antaresia hatchling one week ago, and I can already tell by the way he's scooting curiously around his click clack tub that he's going to be spicy - as a breeder of these little guys, what quirks do you enjoy about them? Are they are curious and active (and as bad at climbing) as womas? I can find plenty of research online about husbandry, feeding, growth etc, but it's much harder to find objective information on snake personalities. ;)
You're unlikely to ever find objective information about snake characters. It's 90% people who have one or two snakes and raving about whatever species they happen to have being the best in the world, 9% anthropomorphosisms where people vividly imagine the snake is doing and thinking things it never could or would, and 1% everything else.

Individual Antaresia may have their quirks but overall I'd just say they have very raw python characters, a sort of pythonic enthusiasm sort of similar to what you'll find in things like Retics, but especially impressive because it's packed into a small package. Antaresia are better climbers than Aspidites, but even more arboreal pythons like Carpets are prone to falling clumsily while climbing. But then again, Australian pythons don't get more dull than Carpets (even if Aspidites are more stupid!).

After working with Ball Pythons abroad, which are surely the worst characters among the world's pythons, I sort of don't mind Carpets and will be happy if I never again have the misfortune of having to deal with a Ball.
 

Flaviemys purvisi

Very Well-Known Member
Trusted Seller
If we're talking purely Australian snakes I'd have to go with scrub pyrhons.... most personality of ANY snakes worldwide.... cobras.
 
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