What snake is this?

Discussion in 'Reptile and Amphibian Identification' started by JimYela, Jun 14, 2013.

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  1. JimYela

    JimYela New Member

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    Hey all, just wondering if you could help me out identifying this snake as i don't want my younger sisters or pets to be harmed if venomous.
    found in gold coast area, Helensvale to be exact. it was moving from drain pipe to the weep holes, any help would be much appreciated :D
    image-1.jpg snake.jpg sorry the pictures arent the best
     
  2. jase75

    jase75 Well-Known Member

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    Its a Keelback. Typical Keelback pattern and body shape.

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  3. JimYela

    JimYela New Member

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    thanks for that after looking on google i wasnt sure if was keelback or roughscale. thanks for the help :D
     
  4. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    I had a keelback in my backyard the other day as well.
     
  5. jase75

    jase75 Well-Known Member

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    I nearly stepped on 1 going to my mailbox the other night. It was raining and about 15 degrees, was very surprised to see one active.

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  6. Trimeresurus

    Trimeresurus Guest

    It may well be a rough scaled, just because it's pattern is similar to a keelback doesn't mean it is one, I'd say its pattern looks similar to a roughys too..
     
  7. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    The pictures are pretty bad for a positive ID but would it be fair to say that the pattern looks more diagonal like a keelback opposed to the banding pattern of the roughscaled snake? I am not very good at ID's and am just asking a question.
     
  8. Trimeresurus

    Trimeresurus Guest


    I just looked at the pictures again on my computer now (was on my phone) and agree it looks more like a keelback. Main thing I was getting at is there can always be variables in pattern ect, and the two species are similar, it's hard to give a 100% postive ID from the pictures taken.
     
  9. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    Yeah best to be on the safe side with wild snakes especially when a mistake can kill you.
     
  10. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    I have yet to see a roughie with diagonal markings. I have gone through every google image avaialble and all I found was a few misidentified Keelbacks. As a result I would personally be comfortable to put it in the 99% plus Keelback category. Unfortunately none of the several different field guides I have referenced use this particular characteristic in distinguishing between the two.

    Blue
     
  11. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    It was remiss of me not to ask that anyone who has evidence to the contrary, with respect to markings on a Rough-scaled Snake, to please present it. It would be extremely important to know about.

    Rough-scaled Snakes are very variable in their patterning, from heavily banded to ‘spots’ arranged in bands to basically unmarked. In the aspect of the direction of their markings, if present, they appear to be 100% consistent in them being arranged at right angles to their length.

    This is a personal observation but it is clearly shared by a number of others here... not surprisingly. Sharing this sort of information and being able to validate it, or otherwise, is a personal learning experience that makes me value what APS has to offer me.

    Blue
     
  12. Bushman

    Bushman Very Well-Known Member

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    I agree that it's most probably a Keelback, despite the poor quality pics.
    Whilst it's most likely to be a Keelback-Tropidonophis mairii (Keelback (Tropidonophis mairii) at the Australian Reptile Online Database | AROD.com.au), always exercise caution regarding snake identification, as future specimens may be the highly venomous Rough-scaled Snake (Rough-scaled snake (Tropidechis carinatus) at the Australian Reptile Online Database | AROD.com.au). These two species are superficially similar and mistaken identity can result in a dangerous bite.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2013
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