What Snake Should I Get?

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by BaileyBro, Mar 7, 2017.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. BaileyBro

    BaileyBro New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2017
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    1
    Gender:
    Male
    Hi im looking to buy a snake im 14 and live in NSW,
    Needs to be 1.5M or less.
    Needs to be calm and ok to be picked up.



    Note: THIS IS MY FIRST SNAKE.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2017
  2. nick_75

    nick_75 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2016
    Messages:
    177
    Likes Received:
    186
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Use the search function in this site to see what has been previously posted on this very common question. My advise is buy books on keeping snakes in captivity. Books have a run down on each species and their care needs.

    If you are unwilling to be bitten get another type of pet. You may or may not be bitten, but you have to be prepared to be.
     
  3. Pauls_Pythons

    Pauls_Pythons Power Seller Power Seller

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2012
    Messages:
    2,074
    Likes Received:
    2,464
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Asking that question on here is going to bring every suggestion available from a children's python to an olive. Read lots and set up an appropriate enclosure well in advance. Learn everything you can particularly about husbandry as this is the most important factor that many new people get wrong. Then go and get what you are passionate about, not someone else's suggestion as you are going to have this animal for many many years.
     
    Iguana and pinefamily like this.
  4. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2013
    Messages:
    2,847
    Likes Received:
    1,986
    Location:
    Mid North SA
    Welcome to APS, and the world of reptiles.
    As Nick has said, do lots of research before you go out and buy a snake. Have you ever had lizards before, or will this be your first reptile?
    Some snakes will tolerate being held, some won't. In general terms, from your description, a snake from the antaresia species would suit. That's a children's, stimson, or a spotted python. Smaller, and generally calm.
     
  5. Iguana

    Iguana Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2016
    Messages:
    395
    Likes Received:
    207
    Location:
    Victoria
    Everyone has given some great advice, make sure to do as much research as you possibly can. Reptiles, particularly long lived pythons, are a huge commitment. Before buying one, make sure that you are 100% committed to caring for that animal, that means vet bills, medications if sick, food expenses etc.

    It's also worth mentioning that not all snakes in a species are the same, I know this kinda goes without saying, but just because a certain species has the reputation of being 'calm' and 'relaxed' doesn't mean each individual snake in that species will be that way, only that there is a higher chance it is.
    Both of my snakes are pretty much the opposite of their species 'norms'.

    Your best bet is a childrens or spotted python, IMO. They stay pretty small (between 1-1.5m) and don't need a huge tank, around 3ft is fine for an adult. They are readily available and you've got a good chance of finding a 'calm' one.
    I also recommend getting from a breeder, a good breeder will give advice if needed and not inflate the prices like pet stores.

    Lastly, as nick_75 put it, if you cannot handle being bitten by a python, young or old. This is not the pet for you, even the most docile snake may give an accidental bite. Furthermore some snakes don't like to be touched, or may be cage defensive, this generally can't be helped it's just the way they are. These are all factors to consider.

    Not meaning to scare you away from snakes/reptiles, but it's not always as straightforward as people think.
    Good luck :)
     
    pinefamily likes this.
  6. princessparrot

    princessparrot Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2012
    Messages:
    1,121
    Likes Received:
    35
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    canberra
    Another one that usually stays on the smaller side are womas. They are the absolute best IMO. Good feeders, relatively calm and and don't mind being handled. On arverage they stay at about 1.5m but can get abit larger depending on the locality
     
  7. Nero Egernia

    Nero Egernia Subscriber Subscriber

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2015
    Messages:
    875
    Likes Received:
    1,503
    Location:
    Western Australia
    It needs to be realized that when keeping ANY animal there's always a risk of being bitten, scratched, slimed, drooled, vomited, or defecated on. Once you accept this, things tend to be much easier.
     
    Stompsy and pinefamily like this.
  8. BaileyBro

    BaileyBro New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2017
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    1
    Gender:
    Male
    i am expected to get bitten i just dont want a "agressive" snake
     
  9. Stompsy

    Stompsy Subscriber Subscriber

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,789
    Likes Received:
    1,153
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Haha! I purchased two more Pink Tongue Skinks at the expo on Saturday and when giving them a quick check over, the male defecated on me and the young guy helping me... I laughed as those guys ALWAYS poo on me, but the breeder was mortified! I kept assuring him it was fine and I'm used to it but he was so apologetic about it.... was kinda odd, but I think he keeps more Bluey's than anything else and they are mostly so docile, they don't really mind anything!
     
    Nero Egernia likes this.
  10. alex.snaith

    alex.snaith Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2017
    Messages:
    127
    Likes Received:
    42
    Gender:
    Male
    Look,
    - Antaresia Python (Stimson, Childrens Or Spotted Python)
    - Pygmy Python
    - Woma Python

    All are hardy species and are fun to look after (all under 1.5m as well)
     
    princessparrot likes this.
  11. Buggster

    Buggster Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2016
    Messages:
    352
    Likes Received:
    326
    I wouldn't call Pygmy's a 'hardy' species. Being so small they can easily get away, are very delicate and are extremely fussy feeders. Not to mention they are rather expensive to buy!

    And I'll have to argue against Woma's being under 5 foot. My girl is only a year old and already at the 4 foot mark (120cm). They are also very thick around and can be difficult to handle for a beginner- and there feeding response is insane. My girl is a sweetheart but will tear me to pieces come feedings days!
     
    pinefamily and Pauls_Pythons like this.
  12. nick_75

    nick_75 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2016
    Messages:
    177
    Likes Received:
    186
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Brisbane
    You will have no guarantee that an animal will not be defensive. Some will be cage defensive and only strike when within their enclosure yet be very calm when be handled outside of the enclosure. Some can be defensive when young and clam down as they age. Others can become defensive as they age. Defensive behavior is not species dependent, decide which species you like and when you look for breeders ask them about the temperament of the parent animals and of previous clutches. Getting tagged by something within the size range you are after is no problem anyway.
     
    Iguana, pinefamily and Pauls_Pythons like this.
  13. alex.snaith

    alex.snaith Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2017
    Messages:
    127
    Likes Received:
    42
    Gender:
    Male
    That's a female woma! Male womas max out at 1.2-1.4m!!
     
  14. Pauls_Pythons

    Pauls_Pythons Power Seller Power Seller

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2012
    Messages:
    2,074
    Likes Received:
    2,464
    Location:
    Melbourne
    I'm no expert on Woma's so I can only comment on research and what I have personally seen.
    I think there will be others along to throw that statement into question.
     
    pinefamily likes this.
  15. alichamp

    alichamp Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2016
    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    69
    Location:
    ACT
    Hi Baileybro,

    Are you also aware that you must have a reptile licence granted to you before you can keep a snake? This will also limit the types of snakes you could keep to those listed as a 'companion' animal in NSW. As you are under 16 years old, you will need to have a parent apply for the licence on your behalf. In the ACT where I live there is a gradual licensing, so that years of experience with one type of reptile means you can get other types down the track. I'm not sure if this is the same in NSW, but consider having your name on the licence and your parent as a co-applicant. This is what I did with my daughter, she's much younger than you but she has been granted the licence with me as co-applicant. This gets both of us known to licensing for any future stuff and means either of us can look after the snake in the future.

    I don't know much about NSW licensing but I believe this link is what you need to know:

    Reptile keeper licences


    As for the first snake, we are almost there too, haven't actually got a snake yet but from 2 years of research about it, a Stimson, childrens or spotted Python are considered good first snakes as others have posted above. Also know they have life expectancy of up to 15-20 years or so, so you may need to make a deal with your parents about what happens when you eventually move out!!
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2017
    pinefamily likes this.
  16. Buggster

    Buggster Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2016
    Messages:
    352
    Likes Received:
    326
    Various wild caught Woma's (and Woma's that have been in the hobby for a very long time) grow incredibly big.
    I can't say where from, but an article I read stated that the person who was one of the first to bring them into the hobby regularly found 8foot + Woma's in the wild.

    Many Woma's you find in the hobby aren't all that old as they are relatively new (having being more heavily restricted when they were first listed as endangered).

    If anything, 5 foot in the minimum of what most standard Woma's will achieve in their lifetime. JMO
     
    princessparrot likes this.
  17. princessparrot

    princessparrot Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2012
    Messages:
    1,121
    Likes Received:
    35
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    canberra
    SA womas are the largest, tanamis the smallest.
     
    pinefamily likes this.
  18. Nero Egernia

    Nero Egernia Subscriber Subscriber

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2015
    Messages:
    875
    Likes Received:
    1,503
    Location:
    Western Australia
    Here's a photo of an adult Woma in Shark Bay.

    Sourced here.

    [​IMG]
     
    pinefamily likes this.
  19. alichamp

    alichamp Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2016
    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    69
    Location:
    ACT
    Poor snakey!! Doesn't look to be too much size distortion in that photo. The man's arm is angled in front so the snake is slightly closer to the camera than the man's body but his arm is still pretty high up and the snake would obviously still be touching the ground from that height even if the arm was angled more in line to his body.
     
  20. alichamp

    alichamp Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2016
    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    69
    Location:
    ACT
    I would like to point out as a newbie that Womas are described as having a "strong feeding response", which is code, I think, for 'watch out you are likely to get bitten especially as a newbie 'cos you will make a mistake and when you do it probably won't let go for a while!! I'm not sure this would be the best option for a 14 yo boy as a first snake regardless of the size issue.
     
    pinefamily and Stompsy like this.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page