Whats wrong with this snake?

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by LaDeDah, Jun 14, 2013.

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  1. LaDeDah

    LaDeDah Active Member

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    I found this snake on gum tree, and I'm just curious as to what the wrinkling of the skin means? Screen Shot 2013-06-14 at 5.26.18 PM.png
     
  2. DaReptileBoy

    DaReptileBoy Well-Known Member

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    maybe MBD?
     
  3. Sezzzzzzzzz

    Sezzzzzzzzz Very Well-Known Member

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    isn't that in lizards?
     
  4. DaReptileBoy

    DaReptileBoy Well-Known Member

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    I think it can happen to snakes 2
     
  5. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    Looks like either a burn or bad shed.
     
  6. Xeaal

    Xeaal Well-Known Member

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    Not enough humidity to shed properly.. repeatedly. There is a large pet store in the Eastern suburbs which sells reptiles and has several baby BHP in the same - well, worse condition, actually.
     
  7. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    I have never heard of MBD in snakes. Have you seen this happen?
     
  8. saintanger

    saintanger Very Well-Known Member

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    looks like a bad shed or burn to me too
     
  9. The_Geeza

    The_Geeza Suspended Banned

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    Looks like it was heavily fed at one time and now starving..... Ouchhh now had a better look on pc... Looks terrible
     
  10. Trimeresurus

    Trimeresurus Guest


    ........

    It's a stuck shed obviously
     
  11. bohdi13

    bohdi13 Well-Known Member

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    what the ? it's clearly a stuck shed? how can it be MBD? It's a piece of skin.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 14, 2013
  12. whyme

    whyme Well-Known Member

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    Looks kike its close to shedding. Cant see a problem.
     
  13. Tsubakai

    Tsubakai Very Well-Known Member

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    Yes it can and does happen but not anywhere near as often as in lizards.

    However, as others have said the python in the photo is having a shedding problem, not MBD (in response to an earlier post but can't be bothered multiquoting)
     
  14. Leasdraco

    Leasdraco Guest

    I think that snake may be underweight or dehydrated...
     
  15. BIGBANG

    BIGBANG Well-Known Member

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    Bad shed, my snakes get those wrinkles leading up to a shed when they coil up but you can see parts of the snake have shed and parts that haven't. Needs a good soak would be my suggestion
     
  16. Venomous_RBB

    Venomous_RBB Very Well-Known Member

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    Bad shed, possible burn there as well hard to see in the pic. But definitely a bad shed, nonetheless.
     
  17. ronhalling

    ronhalling Subscriber Subscriber

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    Just to clear up the facts about MBD and what can get it read this and maybe do some research before making statements like snakes don't get MBD only lizards get it: METABOLIC BONE DISEASE IN REPTILES

    1. What is Metabolic Bone Disease?
    Metabolic Bone Disease (MBD) in reptiles is a term used to describe a problem with their bones which results from a combination of poor nutrition (high phosphate, low calcium and low Vitamin D), kidney disease or inadequate UV B light (leading to Vitamin D and calcium deficiency).
    2. What types of reptiles can be affected?
    All reptiles can potentially be affected by MBD. Turtles and lizards are more commonly affected than snakes.
    3. What signs will an affected reptile show?
    Signs can range from reduced appetite through to soft, bent or broken bones. Other signs include tremors or seizures, general weakness, and reproductive problems. Some reptiles can die from complications arising from MBD.
    4. How is MBD diagnosed?
    MBD can often be detected by performing a radiograph (x-ray) on your reptile.
    5. Can MBD be treated?
    Most cases of MBD can be treated. Treatment often involves splinting or casting broken bones. Calcium supplements by injection or orally (by mouth) will be necessary. In some cases antibiotics and fluids by injection may be required. In the longer term, improvement in diet and access to UV B or natural light are necessary. MBD needs to be treated sooner rather than later to improve the likelihood of success.
    6. Can MBD be prevented?
    The majority of MBD cases can be prevented. Feeding an appropriate, balanced diet will reduce the likelihood of MBD developing.
    Providing UV B in the form of suitable UV B globes, as well as 30 minutes per day of natural sunlight, is necessary for lizards and turtles, and recommended in snakes to enable calcium absorption from the diet
    Keeping your reptile at an appropriate temperature is necessary for your reptile to metabolize calcium appropriately.
    Yearly health checks with a veterinarian that regularly sees reptiles are recommended to ensure your reptile is healthy. Your veterinarian may also recommend yearly radiographs to check bone density. :) ............................................Ron
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2013
  18. Starter

    Starter Not so new Member

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    One of my snakes (7 yrs old Bredli python male) shed today, and in the last few days, I saw on him such "wrinkles" like in the photo, too. Now, after shedding, his skin is again smooth and firm and shiny. But I have another question: On other threads I was told that I don't need to feed my fully grown adult pythons from May to September at all, so they have been without food for about a month now. However, if they shed it obviously means that they are not brumating, and they show some other activities every day, too ... what shall I do? Feed them so they don't starve? I certainly don't want them to suffer - and I read that, after shedding, pythons are usually very hungry. Or do I need to do something else to help this male and my other pythons to fall into brumation state?
     
  19. notechistiger

    notechistiger Subscriber Subscriber

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    Dunno why people that snake looks horrible. It's clearly a shedding issue (either just coming up to shed or needing more humidity while shedding), but either way it's nothing for concern.
     
  20. ronhalling

    ronhalling Subscriber Subscriber

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    Our big girl (Coastal) has never Brumated and she is coming on 6 year old now and has never shown any adverse behaviour from not Brumating, i suppose if the snake wants to Brumate you could just let it be, if it balks at eating and is obviously healthy or spends extended time in it's hide just let nature take hold, some people will lower their night time temps and give shorter periods of heat during the day starting around mid May and continueing through to August-September mimmicking the natural conditions to let their charges Brumate. It comes down to choice, either the snake will choose to Brumate or you will give it the artificial conditions to Brumate. :) ............................Ron
     
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