Why are reptile enthusiasts in Australia not allowed to keep exotic reptiles

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by Cunninghamskinks, Apr 8, 2014.

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  1. Retic

    Retic Almost Legendary

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    The boat has already sailed, so to speak, as far as exports go. I can buy practically any Australian species if I want it. I saw Boyds Dragons in Germany for example. I can buy Gidgees or Lace Monitors or Anthill Pythons. You see where I am going with this.
     
  2. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    Maybe because we would just breed them all with our Aussie natives.


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  3. fallenfeathers

    fallenfeathers Not so new Member

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    I see the arguments here are mainly geared towards snakes & large lizards, I honestly can understand the restrictions on exotic snakes (being carnivorous) but what I can't understand is the restrictions on things like tortoises, what ecological damage could they possibly cause?
     
  4. Red Eared sliders are listed in the top 100 most invasive species world wide.......
    It is far easier to have a blanket ban rather than individually assess each species.
     
  5. Retic

    Retic Almost Legendary

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    Absolutely, TORTOISES would cause no damage whatsoever.
     
  6. butters

    butters Well-Known Member

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    Except to low growing vegetation
     
  7. zulu

    zulu Very Well-Known Member

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    The government has concerns that herds of tortoises could trample fences and raid orchards and sheep paddocks looking for food.
     
  8. Retic

    Retic Almost Legendary

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    Yes, bugger I forgot the low growing vegetation :)
     
  9. Anything that can establish a feral population will have an impact, it's naive to think otherwise.
     
  10. Retic

    Retic Almost Legendary

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    And those tortoises take some catching :)
     
  11. fallenfeathers

    fallenfeathers Not so new Member

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    They're so slow moving I'd imagine that any escapees would be picked off by birds of prey & feral cats/dogs. I'm also thinking that feral populations would quite easily be eradicated if they even emerged in the first place. As others have already stated is it any different than keeping large snakes (such as Olives) out of their native home range. Also don't appreciate being called naive ;)
     
  12. Klaery

    Klaery Well-Known Member

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    I think you might have misunderstood what he said there. What you are describing regarding your hypothetical tortoise situation is not an established feral population.

    Sure tortoise species probably pose very little threat of establishing a feral population but that is hardly an argument to legalize exotic reptiles on a whole and you are unlikely to get to pic and choose your species. We aren't fish hobbyists you know!
     
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