Why exotic reptiles should be banned

Discussion in 'Reptile News' started by pinefamily, Nov 17, 2016.

  1. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Less than 1% survival rate of turtles and tortoises world wide... damn! 20 eggs, how many survive to actually hatch, let alone adulthood, that's close to cane toads... seriously, your argument is flawed. It's fact that tortoises could exist in this country with no detrimental effects, if anything they too would be predated upon and wiped out.

    Just to clarify, our native turtles lay more than 20 eggs twice per season... hence they're all endangered. Hmm...
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2017
  2. Pauls_Pythons

    Pauls_Pythons Subscriber Subscriber Power Seller

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    Regardless of any argument they are an exotic?
    Can anyone guarantee 100% there will be zero impact?

    I think not. I love exotics but the problem isn't the exotics it's the people that keep them.
    They could carry any number of as yet unknown pathogens that could be disastrous for Australian wildlife if/when they are released because the owner got bored with it.
     
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  3. GBWhite

    GBWhite Well-Known Member

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    Totally agree PP.

    I appreciate your passion Kev but Bluetongue makes some pretty logical points in his post. Besides there is also the risk of introducing disease. I remember reading that a large number do host iridovirus and herpesvirus and I also recall reading an article published in the US National Library of Medicine titled "A tortoise- infecting picornavirus expands the host range of the family Picornaviridae" published online in 2015 when i was researching viruses that affected turtles. Picornaviruses can effect mammals and the first picornavirus identified was Foot and Mouth disease

    I think the point that's trying to be made here is why risk introducing them here. Nothing to gain but a hell of a lot to loose if something went wrong.
     
  4. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    I don't debate those risks, my argument was simply if done correctly, and without risk of disease, tortoises would not outcompete any native animal.
     
  5. Ashleyyedwards7

    Ashleyyedwards7 Not so new Member

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    Despite the possibility that tortoises would have no impact in Australia, the idea of deliberately bringing in exotic species should be out of the question, we need to prevent introduction of species and appreciate our own native wildlife. Unless there was conservation value, there really is no need.
    Also (not comparing cats to tortoises of course) the fact that pet cats are legal is beyond me. I know there would be an uproar if they decided to ban cats, it just frustrates me when we know they are one of Australia's biggest threats to wildlife. They (including ferals) reportedly kill 75 million native animals a night and are one of the reasons we have the highest extinction rate in the world. Let's stop bringing in new species!
     
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  6. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Anything and everything regarding turtles (freshwater or marine) and tortoises is conservation motivated given their dire situation. Agree totally regarding cats.
     
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  7. Ashleyyedwards7

    Ashleyyedwards7 Not so new Member

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    I can see you interest in introducing them then. Similar with Black Rhinos, conservationists are pushing to establish a population of them here. Regulations will likely never allow it though with the potential to bring in foot-and-mouth disease...
     
  8. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Yeah foot and mouth would be a catastrophe in this country as we do not import any livestock and out export industry would come to a halt for a decade.
     
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