Wickham Timber Reserve

Discussion in 'Field Herping and Reptile Studies' started by Scutellatus, Sep 18, 2017.

  1. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

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    One little Tommy Roundhead Dragon found on a three hour walk through Wickham Timber Reserve in Yarrabilba Qld.
    20170917_152533-768x1024.jpg 20170917_152453-768x1024.jpg 20170917_152439-768x1024.jpg

    A long deceased bat hanging in a cave.
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    We did find quite a few monitor tracks but the actual monitors were elusive on this occasion.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2017
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  2. Imported_tuatara

    Imported_tuatara Well-Known Member

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    cute little thing! :)
     
  3. longirostris

    longirostris Active Member

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    With respect if I may make a correction, the animal in the pictures is a Tommy Roundhead dragon, Diporiphora australis, female, looks gravid, possibly first clutch coming for this girl as she still looks quite young probably less than a year old. Southern end of their range is northern NSW east of the dividing range. A lot of people confuse these with Nobbi dragons.
     
  4. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

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    No respect needed longirostris, I am very happy to be corrected when wrong.
    Tommy Roundhead was my first thought but the fact that it had no barring on the upper body made me lean toward Nobbi.
    Is the barring only present in males?
    Yes I did think she may be gravid but wasn't sure if she had just stumbled on a large food source instead.
     
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  5. longirostris

    longirostris Active Member

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    This species comes in a huge variety of patterns and colouring. I have had individuals in my collection that have not had a mark on them, just solid grey, both males and females. I have also had animals from this species with completely solid brown heads usually males and then others with very striking patterning or barring. There is no real hard and fast rule with these guys as far as patterning is concerned or even colouring for that matter. Over their range they exhibit quite a degree of variation in both. The best way to pick males from females in this species is the bulges on both sides of the base of the tail which are very obvious in the males especially when looking at a female at the same time. The comparison shows quite strikingly the variation in the thickness at the base of the tail between the males and the females. This method of determining sex by base of tail thickness is also really good for Earless dragons as well.

    Thank you for your good humour in response to my correction.
     

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