Wild food

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by guzzo, Oct 29, 2011.

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  1. guzzo

    guzzo Very Well-Known Member

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    My Brother in law lives on a property in NSW and has a Coastal Carpet. There is an abundance of feral pigeons. Is there really any issues with using these as food? What sort of disease or parasites can a snake get from wild birds that will do it harm?? The wild snakes seem to be doing well on "Barn Food"

    Like.... is a bird that eats seed that lives in a barn really any different from a bird that is kept in a cage that eats seed as far as snake food goes?

    Be interested to see what people have to say on this.
     
  2. SteveNT

    SteveNT Very Well-Known Member

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    Duck mate! The flame throwers are being loaded!
     
  3. GeckPhotographer

    GeckPhotographer Very Well-Known Member

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    And surely if you froze this the parasites would be killed anyway?
     
  4. Leeloofluff

    Leeloofluff Well-Known Member

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    You would have to check local wildlife laws I think. You may consider them feral, but they may be protected. I just wouldn't risk it, too much to worry about.
     
  5. GeckPhotographer

    GeckPhotographer Very Well-Known Member

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    I think he means the introduced species like you find in parks everywhere. These are not native species and aren't protected.
     
  6. Leeloofluff

    Leeloofluff Well-Known Member

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    But still, it's gonna be a lot of effort I'd imagine to catch, kill and freeze the pidgeons. And would they be very good nutritionally? If its just one coastal, Id say stick with buying rodents. There could be something nasty in there.
     
  7. grizz

    grizz Guest

    it's only a coastal so if you get what, 8 feeds before something happens you have saved enough to buy another one.
     
  8. mysnakesau

    mysnakesau Almost Legendary

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    I can't afford to do it, but I am suprised snake keepers, even other animal keepers who animals live on mice, aren't out at Inaminka and places in outback, helping get the mouse plague under control. Take a semi-trailer with you and bring food back to last you a life time.
     
  9. Mister_Snakes

    Mister_Snakes Active Member

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    I think we're all conditioned from over reading internet forums to think that our snakes will curl up and die if we dare introduce them to anything that hasn't been sanitized. Last time I checked snakes were doing pretty well in the wild.
     
  10. JAS101

    JAS101 Very Well-Known Member

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    dont they bait the mice to control/reduce the plagues?
     
  11. guzzo

    guzzo Very Well-Known Member

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    Well I agree....Some people go to extreme measures to sterilize branches while others have just plucked a branch and put it in their enclosure without any probs.

    These are the feral kind of pigeon and are eating grain from the silos. They look fat and healthy...heck I have even thought of eating them myself!!!

    Hey steve............I fear not the flame!!!!
     
  12. GeckoJosh

    GeckoJosh Almost Legendary

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    Having a parasite or pathogen sharing a confined space with a snake is quite different to a snake sharing an entire eco system with them
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2011
  13. Ewan

    Ewan Very Well-Known Member

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    Most keepers will do anything they can to minimize the risk of introducing disease or parasites into their collections. This includes sourcing feed raised in clean conditions. Understandably as disease and parasite infestation can be fatal. Wild pythons have the chance to manage parasite infestation by soaking in large bodies of water and not living in their own waste. Again why most keepers choose to eliminate the risks by cleaning their enclosures and offering water bowls large enough for the snake to soak in.

    In regards to the original question. If you are prepared to manage to potential risk of feeding wild prey then go for it. If not then give it a miss.
     
  14. Mister_Snakes

    Mister_Snakes Active Member

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    I'm definitely not suggesting it's for everyone, but if you were willing to look into having to use a worming regime, and before that faecal floats to see it that is even necessary it might not be such a bad idea.
    It would be interesting to hear from people who have had a bad experience with feeding wild animals when they have followed all logical steps to reduce problems.
    As for me, almost 10 years and no problems yet.
     
  15. longqi

    longqi Very Well-Known Member

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    Although I am a believer in sterilising branches etc
    [mainly for redbacks]
    I also would quite happily feed these to slitherers [and myself]
    Being a food grain silo there is lots of knowledge about the pigeons tucker
    and use of insecticide pesticide etc
    If you have to shoot them dont use sub sonics or soft nose
    That way you wont have to pick the lead out
     
  16. Ewan

    Ewan Very Well-Known Member

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    Mister_Snakes what type of wild prey do you offer and how do you obtain it?
     
  17. hurcorh

    hurcorh Subscriber Subscriber

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    i work out near Inaminka and there are soo many rats out here. good thing is i see quite a few snakes with full bellies which brings a smile to my face. nothing worse than finding a rat in your boot.....after you put your foot in it.....
     
  18. Mister_Snakes

    Mister_Snakes Active Member

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    Hey Ewan, Indian Mynas, I trap them in my backyard, I don't generally feed them as a staple but I have to snakes where they were an appropriate size. Very easy to trap.
     
  19. Ewan

    Ewan Very Well-Known Member

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    How do you trap them? I have trapped them before in bird cages however I only get one at a time.
     
  20. Mo-Cheynei

    Mo-Cheynei Well-Known Member

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    well if you do catch the birds for feed i don't think you need to shoot them, they are not that bright and would be easy to catch by some sort of netting, stick them in a big bird cage or chicken pen and knock them on the head when your ready to use one as feed, so the snakes are getting fresh food.
     
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