Year 12 Major Design

Discussion in 'DIY Zone' started by Jen_179, Nov 20, 2019.

  1. Jen_179

    Jen_179 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    3
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Sydney
    Hi there, Im in Yr 12 and for my Design Technology major project I'm looking to build a custom reptile display case with bioactive enclosures.
    I have to do research on design problems with reptile enclosures. Does anyone have any design faults or needs they wished were incorporated into enclosures/Display cases?

    Any suggestions/comments are greatly appreciated!

    Thanks.
     
  2. -Adam-

    -Adam- Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2019
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    35
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Victoria
    I don't know about a design problem persey. I'm new to the hobby so these maybe bad ideas - please take with a grain of salt.

    Vent Positions

    One thing I have noticed with some cages is that they have the lower vent on the cool side, and higher vent on the hot side, yet other cages have the opposite (high vent on the cool side, and low vent on the warm side). The basics of physics say that heat rises - however what I'm not sure on and may be an interesting study is what is the difference between these two designs.

    My initial guess (and it's a guess) is that one would create more air flow than another and reduces humidity while the other lowers airflow a little, increases humidity and efficiency of the unit. Whether this is correct, and/or there are other benefits or flaws with each model I don't know. Which model you choose, and why you choose it may be worth adding into your project... (I'm guessing one would be better for humid environments and the other for colder environments. Think north qld vs inner land vic/nsw).


    Light Positions

    Something I'm not fond of is seeing the lights at the top of the enclosures. I'm a fan of enclosures where the lights are hidden by a skirting board or otherwise, but that is aesthetical more than functional.


    Doors

    At the moment there are two types of doors to a cage. Sliding (2 each), or hinged (fold out). Both have their cons depending on who you talk to. If you need to add different ideas/thoughts maybe you cound summarise in your project the pro's and con's of each?


    Water/Moisture

    Most melamine cages I have seen are build without protection for water. Water and other fluids if spilled can get into the cracks and slowly rot the wood shortening the cage's life span. Recommendations on forums say to use something like silicon around the floor edges to seal this up so that water doesn't seep in. I'm not sure what you're planning on making - but one of the things that irk me is why this isn't considered or done in the building stage.


    Floor Tray

    Maybe impractical - but one of the things I have thought about if I had the skills to make my own setup would be to have it so that there is a large tray that takes up the floor that could be slid out for cleaning. This would make cleaning very easy - as opposed to how it's done now. It's not so much of an issue with paper substrate but if using other substrate getting in with a brush and pan to clean everything is harder than sliding out a tray and tipping it upside down in the bin or garden. This may not fit for a bioactive cage setup though - I don't know much about those.


    Cable Access

    Many cages require drilling holes, or other permanent modifications for cable access. Maybe you can come up with a solution that is easy for managing cables that allows for modifications later with variations/etc that doesn't create an escape risk.



    As mentioned above - I am very new to this - and some of these may be bad ideas. (I'm sure someone here will step in and say so if that's the case). The idea of the post was more for thinking outside the box (excuse the pun) to give you some ideas/thoughts.
     
  3. Jen_179

    Jen_179 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    3
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Sydney
    This is Amazing, I really can't thank you enough. <3
    My design is basically an interchangeable display case (wood) that has three levels (so each level can be separated and moved with ease) with finished sides that attached to hide the splits of each row (So it looks like one big display case). I also want to make it solar powered and put wheels on the bottom (again for easy moving).
     
    -Adam- likes this.
  4. -Adam-

    -Adam- Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2019
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    35
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Victoria
    You're more than welcome. Sorry no one else came up with some ideas for you. Can you do us a favour and post pictures of the finished design when you're done back here. I'd love to see it!

    Thanks!
     
    Jen_179 likes this.
  5. Jen_179

    Jen_179 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    3
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Sydney
    Of course and thanks again!
     
    -Adam- likes this.
  6. Shikito123

    Shikito123 Not so new Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2017
    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    14
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Brisbane
    id seal the whole thing with pond sealer as well just to be extra careful. Personally I like opening doors better than sliding, I also do like the lights being in a hidden compartment rather than in the enclosure, makes it look neater and more like a mini-ecosystem (which is what most people go for when doing bioactives).
    If you haven't seen this guys channel you really should, it would probably help alot in your project.
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGzXtNdhjPxvCNWFme1bG0g
    He designs lots of bioactive terrariums and paladariums, everything. He's even designed enclosures aswell. SO take a look at him and I hope it helps.
    Good Luck!
     
    Jen_179 likes this.
  7. nick_75

    nick_75 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2016
    Messages:
    160
    Likes Received:
    174
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Hi Adam,

    Your comment about vent placement highlights a very complex subject.
    In essence, the placement of the vents within the thermal gradient has no overall bearing on the flow of air within the enclosure. The placement of the vents (one high and one low) will impact the efficiency of the enclosure though. If the outtake vent (hot air escaping) is close to the heat source, the hot air will escape before being able to heat the enclosure.

    To help the following I will explain a little about thermodynamics. As air raises in temperature it becomes lighter and as air cools it becomes heavier. Hot air doesn't rise, cool air drops which forces hot air above.

    The movement of cold or warm air causes fluctuations in air pressure. Warm air escaping will drop air pressure, this drop in air pressure causes cold air to be drawn in. The reverse is also true, cold air escaping will cause warm air to be drawn in. The air that is drawn in is equalising the pressure.

    Therefore, the outtake vent on the opposite side of the heat source will make the heating of the enclosure more efficient. The hot air will fill up the top of the enclosure and upon reaching the outtake, be released. This will draw air from the intake vent (cold air entering) because of a drop in pressure.

    Now, this cycle of decompression and re-compression can only work if the ambient air temperature outside of the enclosure is colder than the air temperature within the enclosure. The more of a difference in air temperature between the two will create a higher rate of decompression and re-compression (hot air out and cool air in). If the ambient air temperature around the enclosure is the same as the air temperature within the enclosure, there will be no air movement in and out. So, to get good air flow within an enclosure you need to be able to control the air temperature within and around the enclosure.

    The humidity of the enclosure is not overly affected by the air flow. Humidity is directly affected by the abundance of water within the enclosure.

    I hope this helps.

    Regards,
    Nick
     
  8. Jen_179

    Jen_179 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    3
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Sydney
    Hi everyone,
    I have created a survey and if anyone would like to take a few minutes to fill it out I would greatly appreciate it. The data is going towards my portfolio, the final design and end product, which will all be marked by HSC examiners.
    Thanks!

    Problems With Reptile Enclosure Designs - https://s.surveyplanet.com/HItVlXyQ
     
  9. Herptology

    Herptology Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2019
    Messages:
    392
    Likes Received:
    203
    Gender:
    Male
    You have a duplicate question, the last one is Same as one before
     
  10. Jen_179

    Jen_179 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    3
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Sydney
    thanks for bringing that to me, fixed it. one should say what features DO you have while the other should say what features would you like.
     
  11. Brian Dawes

    Brian Dawes New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2017
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    2
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    SA
    If looking for an alternative to a heat lamp, another heating solution that I use for belly warmth, is a heat rope (in conjunction with a thermostat) taped to the underside on a ceramic tile. My snake coils up on that. The principle can be applied to the decorative faux rocks that are hollow or whatever surface you like really, some just have poor thermal properties. Avoid using in a manner where the critter can get direct contact with the rope because parts of the rope will be much hotter than the temperature you have set on the thermostat. Likewise it is important that the sensor for the thermostat controlling the heat rope (or ropes) is affixed the the item you are heating. For example if you want a basking rock to be about 32 degrees and you stick the sensor on the wall of the enclosure, the rope will be on full heat and possibly hot enough to burn your critter, or melt hot glue, while the enclosure is below that temp.
    The heat rope itself is 'waterproof' so can be run through the enclosure and possibly serve other purposes like warming a water source to increase humidity or conversely assist in drying a damp spot.
     
    Jen_179 and -Adam- like this.

Share This Page