AHG or native gecko?

Licespray

Not so new Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2019
Messages
70
Reaction score
21
Found this fellow at work.
Moved it so the butcher birds wouldn’t get it.

28E60F92-A708-4898-9C6A-D4A762E98CCF.jpeg
 

Herpetology

Very Well-Known Member
Trusted Seller
Joined
Jan 8, 2019
Messages
1,285
Reaction score
1,181
I can’t see any bumps/spikes on its tail which is usually a sign of AHG
 

nuttylizardguy

Suspended
Banned
Joined
Nov 2, 2018
Messages
630
Reaction score
213
G.hyra I think. A native gecko.

I only know this because I've got a couple of juvenile g.hyra dubias living inside my house and I had one in a tub to observe ( wife found it on kitchen bench and it hid in roach bait ), I had it for couple of weeks til it escaped when I was replacing the water dish with fresh water.

Your's could be a g.hyra dubia judging form the colour and patterning of "spots".
 
Last edited:

Bluetongue1

Well-Known Member
APS Veteran
Joined
Aug 10, 2015
Messages
853
Reaction score
1,017
Location
Perth
It is a native gecko of the Gehyra genus. The diagnostic features of this genus are the rounded expanded tips of the digits with a large claw emanating from the centre of its top surface on digits n1 to 4. The fifth digit lacks a claw and is often significantly smaller than the other digits.

A geographic location is often very helpful in distinguishing species. Using colour pattern alone can be problematic, although it does definitely look like the Dubious dtella.

Scalation can be utilised, as per the following from AROD website…
Dubious dtella (Gehyra dubia) has subdigital lamellae that are undivided, though may be deeply notched; 9 or more subdigital lamellae on the expanded portion of the 4th toe. While the Eastern tree dtella (Gehyra versicolour) generally has 7 or 8 divided scansors under the expanded portion of the fourth toe; two pairs of enlarged chin shields and second infralabial notched.
 

Licespray

Not so new Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2019
Messages
70
Reaction score
21
It is a native gecko of the Gehyra genus. The diagnostic features of this genus are the rounded expanded tips of the digits with a large claw emanating from the centre of its top surface on digits n1 to 4. The fifth digit lacks a claw and is often significantly smaller than the other digits.

A geographic location is often very helpful in distinguishing species. Using colour pattern alone can be problematic, although it does definitely look like the Dubious dtella.

Scalation can be utilised, as per the following from AROD website…
Dubious dtella (Gehyra dubia) has subdigital lamellae that are undivided, though may be deeply notched; 9 or more subdigital lamellae on the expanded portion of the 4th toe. While the Eastern tree dtella (Gehyra versicolour) generally has 7 or 8 divided scansors under the expanded portion of the fourth toe; two pairs of enlarged chin shields and second infralabial notched.

This was an excellent response, apologies for not seeing it until now! I just wanted to thank you for the effort that went into this reply and to know that it was appreciated. The gecko in question was moved to a place it wouldn’t be crushed while we cleaned up the area.
 

TristanS

Not so new Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2020
Messages
26
Reaction score
3
native, AHGs are more white, i think thats a dtella or a form of velvet gecko
 

Licespray

Not so new Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2019
Messages
70
Reaction score
21
Found 3 or 4 of these guys around the yard since this post.

Question! We get geckos on the windows each night chasing bugs. They’re a pinkish colour, but they never make the kiss sound of the AHG. Or are some AHG’s just silent? I mean they’re only a meter or so away from each other. Is it likely they’re natives or probably AJG’s and sound is nothing to go off of?
 

Bluetongue1

Well-Known Member
APS Veteran
Joined
Aug 10, 2015
Messages
853
Reaction score
1,017
Location
Perth
If they were AHG's then you would undoubtedly be hearing their "chuck, chuck, chuck" call at some stage, whether you can see the geckos or not. The presence or absence of spines along the side of the tail is the most reliable way to identify if AHG or not, respectively. The belly skin on many geckos is translucent (especially so at night) and the pinkish hue would be due to blood in the many tiny blood vessels. Definitely does not sound like AHG’s there (if you’ll excuse the pun).
 

Licespray

Not so new Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2019
Messages
70
Reaction score
21
Well that’s good. Hopefully it continues to remain this way. It’s great having them around as theyre jolly fine entertainment
 

Bluetongue1

Well-Known Member
APS Veteran
Joined
Aug 10, 2015
Messages
853
Reaction score
1,017
Location
Perth
@Licespray, I had not seen the above photo of the gecko on your window. It is the Dubious Dtella Gehyra dubia, based on the chin sheilds, the lack of notching in the second infralabial, 9 or more sub-digital lamellae, of which some are clearly undivided (the others would also be undivided but deeply notched) and the body shape and patterning in the first photo.

This species is known to frequent houses and often in small groups. From memory, they apparently do have a call but it is very high-pitched and above human hearing range.
 

Latest posts

Top