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Laefiren

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Hi. I've kept fish (tropical and cold water) since I was a child (now mid-20s) I've currently got 3 juvenile Green Tree Frogs in a bioactive tank (see DP). I love them and they're gorgeous energetic babies who absolutely do not mind my hand intruding into their space to clean and feed them. Now, I am looking at getting a reptile. I love danger noodles but unfortunately, my housemates are uncomfortable with them so that is off the books. Beardies are definitely on the list as they do not mind the occasional handling and are apparently quite a friendly species with great personalities. I do not want to constantly handle them as that is what I have cats for. I was talking to one of the guys in a reptile store in Northern Adelaide and he mentioned that Lawsons Beardies might work too, which I was a bit sceptical of as my research has shown that they do not live long and often have neurological issues due to inbreeding. (however this might mostly apply outside Aus as they would have limited supply).

Does anyone have any suggestions?

Frog tax attached
 

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HadesPanther

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Are you limited to enclosure cost and/or size?
If you are not limited, i would say go either an eastern blue tongue (Tiliqua scincoides) or central beardie (Pogona vitticeps). if you are limited, i would say go a knobtail gecko.
 
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Laefiren

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Are you limited to enclosure cost and/or size?
If you are not limited, i would say go either an eastern blue tongue (Tiliqua scincoides) or central beardie (Pogona vitticeps). if you are limited, i would say go a knobtail gecko.
I’m not limited by cost but I don’t think I’ve really got space for something longer than a metre (but I might be able to rearrange some furniture) I haven’t really looked much into blue tongues as we have a family that live in our shed anyway. But maybe I will think more about them. Do you know anything about the temperament of Lawsons Beardies? Are they similar to the Central beardies?
 
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Ajar5

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Angle headed dragons are easy to care for and do well in bioactive enclosures also. Blue tongues are hard to beat as a first reptile. All comes down to what you like
 

dragonlover1

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Hi, whoever told you Lawsons (P. henrylawsoni) are short lived obviously doesn't know what he is talking about. I keep these guys (amongst other dragons) Pygmy beardies live for around 9-12 years. Yes they are not particularly happy about being handled but this is what you want. If you want any more info on pygmies , just ask. Pygmies are my favourite dragon out of all the dragons I keep
 

Laefiren

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Hi, whoever told you Lawsons (P. henrylawsoni) are short lived obviously doesn't know what he is talking about. I keep these guys (amongst other dragons) Pygmy beardies live for around 9-12 years. Yes they are not particularly happy about being handled but this is what you want. If you want any more info on pygmies , just ask. Pygmies are my favourite dragon out of all the dragons I keep
I was doing some research on American herpetology forums. I’m not sure we export them anymore and they’re not as popular as centrals so theirs seem to be inbred which leads to shorter lifespan. That not being the case here is a relief to hear. The guy at the reptile place also assured me that wasn’t the case in Australia either but obviously I want to check multiple sources as I’ve been scammed by pet shops before (Guinea pig pedigree rejects with terrible health issues that became apparent as they aged, we didn’t know they were pedigree)

What would you guys think about Pink Tongued Skinks or Gidgee Skinks?
 
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Sugar

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I was doing some research on American herpetology forums. I’m not sure we export them anymore and they’re not as popular as centrals so theirs seem to be inbred which leads to shorter lifespan. That not being the case here is a relief to hear. The guy at the reptile place also assured me that wasn’t the case in Australia either but obviously I want to check multiple sources as I’ve been scammed by pet shops before (Guinea pig pedigree rejects with terrible health issues that became apparent as they aged, we didn’t know they were pedigree)

What would you guys think about Pink Tongued Skinks or Gidgee Skinks?
I’ve been looking at pink tongue skinks for a while, I really want to get some! Although I don’t know much of there husbandry so I will have to do some research on them first.
Watching this post for info 😊
 

kankryb

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Bluetongues shinglebacks and pinktongues are great for everyone, friendly tame interesting also easy to keep and feed
 

Laefiren

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I’ve been looking at pink tongue skinks for a while, I really want to get some! Although I don’t know much of there husbandry so I will have to do some research on them first.
Watching this post for info 😊
Apparently they’re similar to blue tongues in care requirements but they’re smaller and they’re semi arboreal so a taller rather than wider tank is better for them.
 

kankryb

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I keep and breed pinktongues and done it for +40 years (also bluetongues) I have 2 setups for pinktongues and I get the same amount of babies from the 2 setups, first is 60x90x45 and second is 100x50x50 so my point is that you don't need a tall tank to keep and breed pinktongues 😀
 

Friller2009

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I’ve been looking at pink tongue skinks for a while, I really want to get some! Although I don’t know much of there husbandry so I will have to do some research on them first.
Watching this post for info 😊
Pink tongues are great. If you’re looking for quality info, talk to kankryb. He’s the best pink tongue skink owner I know.
I currently have a young pair of patternless pink tongue skinks and they tend to hide a lot as babies. They are always buried in the substrate. Super easy to feed, mine only eat dog and cat food but I’m sure they will accept fruits when they are older.
Eventually I plan to put them in an enclosure measuring 5ftx2ftx6ft.
These guys are great. Hope you end up getting some.
 

kankryb

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I hardly ever seen mine eat fruit or green but a few insect, few earthworms, pinkie mice, cow heart, cat or dog food BUT my pinktongues are fed 90% garden snails straight from the wild and in 40 odd years never had any problems with that, no parasites no heart worm not an issue
 

Laefiren

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Okay so Pink Tongues seem like a really good option. No one for Gidgee/Stokes Skinks?
What kind of substrate do you guys use for Pinks so they can bury themselves? I assume you still want to avoid sand with them so they don’t get impacted?
 

Friller2009

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Okay so Pink Tongues seem like a really good option. No one for Gidgee/Stokes Skinks?
What kind of substrate do you guys use for Pinks so they can bury themselves? I assume you still want to avoid sand with them so they don’t get impacted?
I have no experience with gidgees but have done quite a bit of research on their car and I have experience with their relatives Cunningham’s skinks.

Gidget Skinks are an arboreal, desert-dwelling species of skink. They like it hot. I have found that Egernia are a lot like monitors. They are very active, and like to be cooked. My Cunningham’s skinks actively bask at a 40 degree basking spot. They will appreciate vertical hollow logs and climbing space. To increase surface area I would recommend adding a background that covers most of the walls of the cage. You want a taller cage. As an absolute minimum size enclosure I would recommend something about 90cmx45x60 but I would say go taller. Provide them with a hot basking spot and access to a UV light (while not necessary for skinks I highly recommend it. You will see a another world of activity and behaviour from the animals). For substrate I would say something like a coir and sand mix.

For pink tongues I will link a thread I made on my enclosure build


For a substrate I used a mixture of Eucy mulch, coconut coir (you don’t need to use the fancy reptile brand stuff. Just use the stuff from Bunnings), play sand, orchard bark and sphagnum moss.

I wouldn’t see an issue with pink tongues getting impacted as you wouldn’t keep them on plain sand. They are a tropical species and need humidity.
 
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Laefiren

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Huh I had no idea they were arboreal. I’ve been trying to get myself a copy of the Australian skinks book but it’s not available as an ebook it seems and I can’t find a hard copy.

Thanks heaps for the detailed pink tongue information.

I have no experience with gidgees but have done quite a bit of research on their car and I have experience with their relatives Cunningham’s skinks.

Gidget Skinks are an arboreal, desert-dwelling species of skink. They like it hot. I have found that Egernia are a lot like monitors. They are very active, and like to be cooked. My Cunningham’s skinks actively bask at a 40 degree basking spot. They will appreciate vertical hollow logs and climbing space. To increase surface area I would recommend adding a background that covers most of the walls of the cage. You want a taller cage. As an absolute minimum size enclosure I would recommend something about 90cmx45x60 but I would say go taller. Provide them with a hot basking spot and access to a UV light (while not necessary for skinks I highly recommend it. You will see a another world of activity and behaviour from the animals). For substrate I would say something like a coir and sand mix.

For pink tongues I will link a thread I made on my enclosure build


For a substrate I used a mixture of Eucy mulch, coconut coir (you don’t need to use the fancy reptile brand stuff. Just use the stuff from Bunnings), play sand, orchard bark and sphagnum moss.

I wouldn’t see an issue with pink tongues getting impacted as you wouldn’t keep them on plain sand. They are a tropical species and need humidity.
You spoke of your experience with Cunningham skinks. I’ve googled them realising the name was familiar and realised they live in Mount Lofty SA. Which is coincidentally also where I live.
 

Friller2009

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You spoke of your experience with Cunningham skinks. I’ve googled them realising the name was familiar and realised they live in Mount Lofty SA. Which is coincidentally also where I live.
Yep. Cunningham's Skinks are found endangered in the South Australian part of their range. I have the Sydney Sandstone locality of them. They tend to differ a lot in size and colouration in different localities. The New England locality are much larger than Sydney Sandstone ones.
 
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