Brumation question

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Pythonguy1

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Hey guys, so I'v heard that some people brumate their snakes, does this mean that they cause their snakes to brumate? If so, how is it done? How important is it? Also, do the conditions have to be different or will they automatically go into brumation in winter? My stimson python went into brumation last year but this year he's getting more heat. Will this effect the brumation process? Any help would be absolutely awesome.
Thanks in advance, Josiah
 

Sdaji

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It's just a vague term for slowing down in the cool part of the year. You do it by cooling them down. Importance varies by species, ranging from critical to unimportant. Yes, more or less heat will affect them, they're reptiles, heat is the most important environmental factor for reptiles.
 

Pythonguy1

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Importance varies by species, ranging from critical to unimportant.
He's a stimson python. He's been burrowing under his paper closer to the heat mat to recieve more warmth. If I stop him from burrowing thus dercrease the amount of heat he's getting will that cause him to brumate?
 

Sdaji

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He's a stimson python. He's been burrowing under his paper closer to the heat mat to recieve more warmth. If I stop him from burrowing thus dercrease the amount of heat he's getting will that cause him to brumate?

You seem to be looking at this as a digital concept when in reality it's analog. Don't try to stop him from burrowing, just turn down the heat if you want him cooler. At this time of year male Stimson's Pythons are naturally quite active; this is the peak mating season and they actively run around trying to find females. It's a challenge for them to do it in the coldest part of the year, but that means only the strongest manage to get the girls and only the best genes get passed to the next generation. It's not like when temperatures drop below a certain threshold they suddenly fall into complete torpor until they suddenly snap out of it later in the year.
 

Pythonguy1

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Don't try to stop him from burrowing, just turn down the heat if you want him cooler.
I'm using a heat mat and I dont have a thermostat, so I cant turn down the heat. Last year I had him on a different substrate and he couldn't burrow, so he was getting the same amount of heat from his mat all year round, but when winter came he went into brumation. I didn't turn down the heat or anything.
At this time of year male Stimson's Pythons are naturally quite active;
So then how important is it for him to brumate?
 

Sdaji

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I'm using a heat mat and I dont have a thermostat, so I cant turn down the heat. Last year I had him on a different substrate and he couldn't burrow, so he was getting the same amount of heat from his mat all year round, but when winter came he went into brumation. I didn't turn down the heat or anything.

It would be worth improving your setup.

So then how important is it for him to brumate?

Again, you're looking at an analog situation as though it was a digital situation. In other words, you seem to be thinking that he either is cold and dormant or hot and active, when in reality heat, metabolism and behaviour exist in broad spectra. It's relatively important to give him cooling, but again, this is an analog issue, not a digital one.

Get a thermostat and set up the heating properly.
 

nick_75

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I'd make getting a thermostat your primary concern. Controlling temps in order to start or end brumation will be easier. How do you control temps currently, without a thermostat?
 

Sdaji

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Is there any way I can brumate him without a heat mat like I did last year?

You've asked for advice, take the advice or discard the advice. All I'm going to recommend is that you use a thermostat and a timer. If you have alternative ideas that's fine, go for it, but if you want to reinvent the wheel that's your choice and your venture.
 

Pythonguy1

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You've asked for advice, take the advice or discard the advice. All I'm going to recommend is that you use a thermostat and a timer. If you have alternative ideas that's fine, go for it, but if you want to reinvent the wheel that's your choice and your venture.
Thanks for your advise anyway Sdaji, I just didn't want to spend money on something I didn't need. If I'v brumated him before without a thermostat, I reckon I can do it again ;)
 

Sdaji

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When the mat overheats (not likely but **** happens) because u don’t want to spend 50$, let us know

It probably won't, but a thermostat allows greater control over the temperature which exactly what he's trying to do in this situation. It's much easier to get the job done with a piece of equipment specifically designed to do it, which is why virtually everyone does it that way. You can skimp on the equipment and try to achieve the same result with creative methods if you want to. It's more difficult and more likely to give a bad result, but hey, it's possible and if he wants to do it, that's his choice. If he comes up with an unconventional method which works, good luck to him.
 

Pythonguy1

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When the mat overheats (not likely but **** happens) because u don’t want to spend 50$, let us know
50$!! If I found one that cheap I'd certainly grab it. Also, I have heat mats without thermostats for all my snakes and none ever have overheated.
Good luck :)
Thanks mate.
 
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Ajar5

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How did your enclosure change from last year other than substrate? They will usually brumate from naturally decreased ambient air temps and food availability. Is the enclosure well ventilated and in a cool place?
 

WizardFromAus-

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I'd make getting a thermostat your primary concern. Controlling temps in order to start or end brumation will be easier. How do you control temps currently, without a thermostat?
I think some people this days just get a low watt and rely on thermostat built inside of them if ya get me.. thermostats is the way to go though for sure for more controle

Sent from my SM-A520F using Tapatalk
 

Bluetongue1

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I spent some time preparing this response and got interrupted by other things before I could finish it and post it. I realise the conversation has moved on in the meantime, but hopefully you might still find this of some value.

How do you recognise brumation? For many, the term ‘brumation’ conjures up images of a reptile being totally inactive for three or four months during winter, until the weather begins to warm up in spring. Yet this is not necessarily what happens. In nature, many reptile species come out and bask on sunny winter days. They may even drink. What they won’t do is eat. So to avoid confusion and yet answer your questions, let’s just talk about cooling, rather than brumating.

With the possible exception of the Diamond, cooling is NOT essential for Oz pythons. However, if you intend to breed them, then for most species cooling is recommended. The reason for this is that cooling can considerably increases the chances of breeding success. This is a generalisation and you will get exceptions to the rule. In Australia, cooling is most appropriate for the months May to July, although August is sometimes included. Partial cooling may be done in the months either side of this period, but there is no evidence to suggest this is any more effective. A lot of keepers who do not intend to breed will still cool their animals over winter. The reasons for this vary, such as: it provides a more natural yearly cycle; it allows the keeper a break from feeding and cleaning; it can save on heating and feeding costs; or any combination.

There are two main ways to go about cooling. The simplest approach is to reduce the running time of the ‘hot spot’ heater during the cooler months. The other main approach is to reduce the maximum temperatures reached during the cooling period. Clearly the second approach can only be implemented where one has variable control over the temperatures in the enclosure, such as via a thermostat.

The most difficult question to answer is how much cooling i.e. by how many hours should one turn off the “hot spot’ heater; by how many degrees should one reduce the maximum temperatures? If you asked 10 different people, you may get 10 different answers. This is where researching reliable sources comes into play. Make use of books and the net, but be selective. Restrict yourself to authors who have the runs on the board. Do not expect total agreement, as there is more than one way to skin a cat. However it will give you a ‘feel’ for an appropriate range within which to operate.
 
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Pythonguy1

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I spent some time preparing this response and got interrupted by other things before I could finish it and post it. I realise the conversation has moved on in the meantime, but hopefully you might still find this of some value.

How do you recognise brumation? For many, the term ‘brumation’ conjures up images of a reptile being totally inactive for three or four months during winter, until the weather begins to warm up in spring. Yet this is not necessarily what happens. In nature, many reptile species come out and bask on sunny winter days. They may even drink. What they won’t do is eat. So to avoid confusion and yet answer your questions, let’s just talk about cooling, rather than brumating.

With the possible exception of the Diamond, cooling is NOT essential for Oz pythons. However, if you intend to breed them, then for most species cooling is recommended. The reason for this is that cooling can considerably increases the chances of breeding success. This is a generalisation and you will get exceptions to the rule. In Australia, cooling is most appropriate for the months May to July, although August is sometimes included. Partial cooling may be done in the months either side of this period, but there is no evidence to suggest this is any more effective. A lot of keepers who do not intend to breed will still cool their animals over winter. The reasons for this vary, such as: it provides a more natural yearly cycle; it allows the keeper a break from feeding and cleaning; it can save on heating and feeding costs; or any combination.

There are two main ways to go about cooling. The simplest approach is to reduce the running time of the ‘hot spot’ heater during the cooler months. The other main approach is to reduce the maximum temperatures reached during the cooling period. Clearly the second approach can only be implemented where one has variable control over the temperatures in the enclosure, such as via a thermostat.

The most difficult question to answer is how much cooling i.e. by how many hours should one turn off the “hot spot’ heater; by how many degrees should one reduce the maximum temperatures? If you asked 10 different people, you may get 10 different answers. This is where researching reliable sources comes into play. Make use of books and the net, but be selective. Restrict yourself to authors who have the runs on the board. Do not expect total agreement, as there is more than one way to skin a cat. However it will give you a ‘feel’ for an appropriate range within which to operate.
Thanks Bluetongue1 :)
 

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