Gecko ID

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Snek_Kid

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Hello all, I've recently started herping and was looking for an identification on these lizards I found. I believe the first two are Bynoes geckos and the 3rd gecko to be a house gecko but I'm still unsure and would love to get some clarification. Cheers!
 

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Snek_Kid

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I'm just herping, I should have also mentioned that i'm up in north Queensland, I also don't have any more photos as I let the them go (where I found them) after uploading the photos.
 
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Friller2009

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I'm just herping, I should have also mentioned that i'm up in north Queensland, I also don't have any more photos as I let the them go (where I found them) after uploading the photos.
Why don’t you just take the photos where you find them? If you take them from the wild and then return them you’re still catching...
 

Snek_Kid

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They're a bit too quick to take a clear photo. I didn't realize that this would be an issue. I apologize if what I did offended anyone, I'll remember to just look next time. I just thought that you guys would find it easier to identify them if they were in a brighter area.
 

Herpetology

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you should look into getting a DSLR camera ;) u can find a 2nd hand older model for $1,000~
noones offended, but herping isnt about catching things to ID them, and then putting them back
 

Snek_Kid

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you should look into getting a DSLR camera ;) u can find a 2nd hand older model for $1,000~
noones offended, but herping isnt about catching things to ID them, and then putting them back
My bad. I don't have the money to get a proper camera so I just used a phone.
 

Friller2009

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They're a bit too quick to take a clear photo. I didn't realize that this would be an issue. I apologize if what I did offended anyone, I'll remember to just look next time. I just thought that you guys would find it easier to identify them if they were in a brighter area.
Don’t worry. The only reason we brought it up was legality. We don’t want a keen herper to end up with a big fine!
 

kankryb

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You have crazy rules about reptiles downunder 🙄😀 but don't let that stop you and your herping and if you only have a phone use that 👍 I'm 54 and never had a camera, just use my phone 👍 so keep on herping and posting 🇩🇰
 

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Ben_Imbricata

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Phones can be hard to get good photos sometimes, if your trying at night time use a good torch for lighting and not the flash on your phone and you can get some better photos 41653D98-9B16-425B-9158-273DB04364C1.jpeg 8A6DB042-6122-4123-94DA-FF9E0F611129.jpeg 5E0EBE4F-BFD5-439C-A9C0-7ACED4A1D5E4.jpeg
 
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Bluetongue1

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I think it’s great that you are trying to get to know your local herpetological fauna by getting IDs checked. While it may not be legal to catch them for a closer look, or a photograph, the reality is it does no real harm, so long as you don’t destroy habitat in the process. Obviously not the thing to do if in a national park, but elsewhere, such as the local rubbish tip, I’d exercise my own judgement, bearing in mind the risk. One thing I would definitely NOT advocate is taking them home (to photograph). There are two reasons. Firstly, if you have reptiles of your own you could unwittingly transfer unnatural parasites or diseases to wild populations. Secondly you open yourself up to poaching or keeping without a license charges, which are serious.

Your IDs were correct…
Bynoe’s geckos can be identified by their long, thin tails and covering of irregularly sized raised scales with dark and light spots. The light spots can often be arranged in roughly transverse lines or bands, especially on the tail.
The key diagnostic feature of the Asian House gecko are two lines of dorsolateral blunt spinose scales running backwards from the base of the tail. They also have expanded ovate-shaped toe pads, with a claw emanating from the top surface on each digit.

PS
Depending on the terrain, you could use a roll of lightweight plastic grass/garden divider as a temporary ‘fence’ to corral specimens whilst photo graphing them.
 

Snek_Kid

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I think it’s great that you are trying to get to know your local herpetological fauna by getting IDs checked. While it may not be legal to catch them for a closer look, or a photograph, the reality is it does no real harm, so long as you don’t destroy habitat in the process. Obviously not the thing to do if in a national park, but elsewhere, such as the local rubbish tip, I’d exercise my own judgement, bearing in mind the risk. One thing I would definitely NOT advocate is taking them home (to photograph). There are two reasons. Firstly, if you have reptiles of your own you could unwittingly transfer unnatural parasites or diseases to wild populations. Secondly you open yourself up to poaching or keeping without a license charges, which are serious.

Your IDs were correct…
Bynoe’s geckos can be identified by their long, thin tails and covering of irregularly sized raised scales with dark and light spots. The light spots can often be arranged in roughly transverse lines or bands, especially on the tail.
The key diagnostic feature of the Asian House gecko are two lines of dorsolateral blunt spinose scales running backwards from the base of the tail. They also have expanded ovate-shaped toe pads, with a claw emanating from the top surface on each digit.

PS
Depending on the terrain, you could use a roll of lightweight plastic grass/garden divider as a temporary ‘fence’ to corral specimens whilst photo graphing them.
Thank you for the advise and confirmation!😁
 

Bluetongue1

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Always happy to help out a new herper, as are most other experienced members here. So please don't stop asking questions .

By the way, I actually joined in 2007 but a several years bac k the system crashed and they permanently lost a certain amount of data. Several longterm members were affected. I personally lost almost 7,000 posts and a good friend at the time lost considerably more. His information was held in very high esteem so that a bitter blow at the time. However, saved info plus the threads since then contain some excellent information. So I’d advise you play around with SEARCH optgion available because it can be a real gold mine once you master how to best use it.

Good luck with, and as a incredibly knowledgeable friend of mine would say: “Keep on wriggling!”
 
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