Gecko & skink ID please

Archer

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Hi everyone, been away for a bit.
Appreciate an id on these 2 little guys
 

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Friller2009

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Hi everyone, been away for a bit.
Appreciate an id on these 2 little guys
The gecko looks to be some sort of strophurus because of the shape and colouration of the eye. Most likely the northern spiny tailed gecko; strophurus ciliaris or the golden tailed gecko; strophurus taenicauda.
For the skink i am not too sure but it may be an eastern water skink; eulamprus quoyii. This is because of the banding down the side, however the glare from the sun blocks the colour.
 

Sdaji

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The gecko looks to be some sort of strophurus because of the shape and colouration of the eye. Most likely the northern spiny tailed gecko; strophurus ciliaris or the golden tailed gecko; strophurus taenicauda.
For the skink i am not too sure but it may be an eastern water skink; eulamprus quoyii. This is because of the banding down the side, however the glare from the sun blocks the colour.
Way off on the skink, closer on the gecko.
 

Bluetongue1

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@Archer, can you provide a full body photo and location for the gecko? This would allow firm confirmation of the species.

@Pythonguy1, your guess was right on the money with the Eastern Striped Skink Ctenotus robustus. The general body shape and dorsal striping indicates a Ctenotus species, while the robust build, arrangement of dorsal stripes and pattern on the sides identifies it as C. robustus.

@Friller2009, I agree that the gecko is most likely a Strophurus species, as indicated by the brightly coloured iris rim and the patterning consisting of small dark dots without lines or patches, as would be the case with other genera such as Gehyra. It is not S. taenicauda – the dark spots are too small and too separate. I reckon I know what it is but it would be good for others to haven a go at identifying it, especially if we can get a whole body shot.
 

Archer

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Thank you guys.
Here is a dorsal view of the gecko. Hope that helps.

Location is the Warrumbungle area, north west nsw
 

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Bluetongue1

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Well done @Herpetology. You nailed it.

While S. williamsI was the front runner, I hadn’t ruled out S. intermedius as a potential candidate. The large size of the spinose scales and there being four rows (two each side) on the tail confirmed the identity.

@Archer, thanks for the extra photos.
 

eipper

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It's two rows of tubercles not four rows (in williamsi, the four rows run parallel and are evenly separated; they are usually straight and longer).

williamsi and intermedius
 

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Bluetongue1

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Thanks for that Scott. Archer now has all the info he needs to make his own ID and to distinguish between the two species in future.
 

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