ID and is this little guy ok?

vlowe

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This little lizard has been hanging on my screen door for a couple of days. I checked it out yesterday, it wasn't upset about being held which was a bit concerning, and it seems a bit thin. I let it go and this morning found it back near the screen door again, and isn't really moving. I'm worried it isn't feeding. Could you let me know what type of lizard it is, and if there is anything I can do to help it along? It is still on the wall, so I can take what ever photos are needed for ID.
 

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dragonlover1

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This little lizard has been hanging on my screen door for a couple of days. I checked it out yesterday, it wasn't upset about being held which was a bit concerning, and it seems a bit thin. I let it go and this morning found it back near the screen door again, and isn't really moving. I'm worried it isn't feeding. Could you let me know what type of lizard it is, and if there is anything I can do to help it along? It is still on the wall, so I can take what ever photos are needed for ID.
can you take better photo's ? and what is your location?
It looks like a Pogona minor but pics aren't clear enough
 

vlowe

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I'm on the Gold Coast. We have bushland directly across the road. Do these images help?
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Does anyone have advise on how to check its health? I would happily take it on as a pet if it can't survive in the wild. But if it looks healthy, I'll just leave it be.
[automerge]1609551111[/automerge]
Looks a lot happier today, so I’ll just leave it be.
 

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Bluetongue1

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Lace_monitor is correct. dragonlover1 provided a viable possibility given the lack of information he had to work with at that stage. It goes show how important geographic location is in most IDs and how a variety of photo angles can assist.

This is a very young Pogona barbata hatchling. If you have a look at the belly you will probably see a dark line in the lower midline where the yolk sac was attached. The patterning is distinctive for young Pogona and will fade as the lizard ages. The other diagnostic features of Pogona are the spinose scales along the back of the jaw and head and the line of them along the dorsal-ventral edge of the depressed body. As this species can lay 30+ eggs, don’t be surprised if more individuals turn up around your yard.

If you want to assist it in the critical transition of the lizard using up the last of its yolk food reserves to catching and eating its own food, then supply it with small insects and arthropods, such as crickets, woodies, beetles, spiders, flies, maggots, black soldier flies, moths and butterflies, grasshoppers ,earwigs and the like. If feeding in an open container then render flying insects incapable of free flight. The internal changes that are taking place during this period are possibly responsible for the lizard’s lack of response to being picked up. It should be a lot mor alert and responsive a few days down the track.

The ideal length of prey items is the width of the lizard’s head. Young P. barabata are essentially carnivorous and don’t become omnivorous until they have grown. Whatever food they take in for the first 12 months or so is essentially utilised for growth.
 

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