Ideas for Stimsons Python Enclosure

CarlosTheSnake

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Hey all,
Carlos is smashing down food now and just shed again! hasn’t grown much he’s about 9 months and 35cm, but he’s growing. When he gets a bit bigger i’d like to move him into a larger naturalistic enclosure. i want to make and arid/outback australia themed enclosure with red sand (though i’ll need a substitute for red sand), rocks and spinifex. Any ideas or photos of enclosures with a similar theme would be greatly appreciated. Any tips also appreciated
 

Herpetology

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why do you need a substitute for red sand if you're going to have spinifex

i would recommend getting a background design

HwCKAJ5.png
 

CarlosTheSnake

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why do you need a substitute for red sand if you're going to have spinifex

i would recommend getting a background design
i’ve been told not to use sand multiple times as snakes can swallow it or it can get stuck in their vents or nostrils. something more like this is what i was going for, obviolosuly it would have to be a bit different to suit a snake though
 

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Susannah

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i’ve been told not to use sand multiple times as snakes can swallow it or it can get stuck in their vents or nostrils. something more like this is what i was going for, obviolosuly it would have to be a bit different to suit a snake though
Yeah, I've heard that too. I'll be interested to hear what folks say!

You can get "sand" that is crushed up walnut shells. They're not as dusty as the red sand, but way more expensive. I used to use it until I wasn't able to get some one time, so swapped to the red sand. I have to admit, I don't like the red sand, but it's way cheaper and I tend to clean the tank quite often...so is much more economical. Not that it's a big factor for me given I only have one snake (at the moment!)
 

Herpetology

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The sand you don’t want them swallowing is the sand that becomes hard as a rock when wet aka calcium sand/calcisand, because when they do swallow the sand it gets lodged and causes impaction

fake red sand is just dyed calcium sand and is usually a lot cheaper than real red sand

real red sand has like a 2% clay composition and doesn’t get hard as a rock and is very fine






 

Susannah

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Thanks, that's good to know. The sand I have is the dusty kind, so the "better" option. But I hate it as it's so dusty! No wet clumps at all!
 

Bluetongue1

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Is sand a suitable substrate for a snake? I reckon that the answer to this question depends on the type of sand and the type of snake. Let’s just tackle the second part of this for now.

Species that spend a large amount of time on the ground in very sandy areas are suitable candidates. Those that are essentially arboreal or rock-dwelling, even when occurring in arid areas, are not. So Womas and BHPs will do fine on sand, whereas it is not really suitable for Morelia species, including bredli. The Pilbara Olive Pythons is a semi-arid zone species but again, a rock-dweller, so also not suitable. Of the Antaresia, it is really only Stimson’s Python that is sometimes found in sandplain or dune country, and only when there is good cover of large spinifex clumps. I know people who have kept stimmies on sand without any ingestion issues. The main problem was the tendency of the snakes to push sand into the runners of glass sliding doors. Some have since switched to coir fibre mixes which overcome that problem, while still looking natural and allowing the snakes to burrow. If you keep stimmies on paper, put it in several layers thick and they can then ‘bury’ themselves under the top sheets.
 

Susannah

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20210801_144915.jpg
This is Russell's abode. There's a heat mat under the left hide, another heat lamp above the stick (turns on and off as needed) and lights above. Sometimes I toss in another hide. He likes to hide! At night he'll sit on the rack.
 

CF Constrictor

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Looking good. I would add an extra branch or 2 maybe, and some plastic vines, there seems to be plenty of climbing space available. Use your imagination, just make sure its safe. Good luck.
 

Pythonguy1

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Something I would do if there's any risk of the snake ingesting substrate that could be harmful to it is this; place the feed on a paper towel in the enclosure so that none of the substrate gets on the rat/mouse and the snake eats it ON the paper towel without ingesting any substrate. This method has worked for me over the years and subsequently I've never had a snake ingest ANY substrate.
 

Susannah

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I tend to feed outside of the enclosure anyway. Less need for cleaning his enclosure. I have a few of those metal shelfs things, so can also just put it over that, then nothing touches the substrate anyway. Plus he's a little snake (as Stimmies are!), so I don't really have issues with containing him!
 

Jonesy1103

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Alright thanks!!
I got worded off the sand and went with Astro Turf, I am sure I have seen it in different colours these days. Maybe try Red Astroturf, long hair type. And if you have a stumpy Spinifex pot plant and the foliage is long enough it will probably utilise that as an alternative hide.

I have a Childrens Python, not a Stimmie though. So for a floor level cool hide it has this Bunnings decorative paver rock perched on decorative pebbles that make it a hide, basking rock, and apparently poo place as well! And a local log I hollowed out.

Yours will want a broader floor as mine likes to climb so I built a climbing style viv (pic 2) and yeh, it utilises all levels and hides.

Try Red astro Turf if you see it. On cleaning day I just pull it out and pressure wash it
 

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Timmah

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So Smaug moved into his new home today, so here is my Stimmie Enclosure idea!

same hide, plus a hide on the cool side, tree in the middle and water/same log as his little home. Heat mat under the glass like the starter tank had.

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AHHHH THE FLOOR IS LAVA!! 😂
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