Juvenile diamond python not eating

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DiamondDave

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I Recently bought home my first snake a juvenile diamond python about 8-10 months old and have had him reasonably undisturbed in his enclosure for about a week my temps sit between 31 degrees on the hot side and 27 on the cool side my issue is he hasnt been fed for about two weeks and i am having the issue of him wanting too eat (i imagen due to stress) I mistakenly handled him the second day i had him home but have since then realised that i shouldnt be (until fully settled) and have stopped handling and left him be. tried feeding him today but with no success

My enclosure is a 22 litre reptile one hatchling terrarium with 12w heat mat set to 30 degrees on a thermostat 24/7 i have a small reptile hide that he seems to spend most of his time in i do all my temp reading with a infrared thermometer and from the information i have gathered seem to be good and have the enclosure properly set up (still unsure due to be new to this)

My issue and concern is that he isnt eating and hasnt been fed for two weeks above that i dont want to stress the poor thing out and am curious as to whether he needs more time to settle or if i am doing something wrong with my husbandry (ive been finding it very difficult to find sufficient information on the subject of diamond pythons and there care)

Any information will be greatly appreciated thankyou



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Snapped

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Hi, and welcome to the forum.
It's good to let them settle in for a week or 2 before feeding, and it probably stressed him out handling the 2nd day.
Leave him for a week and try again, without disturbing him for anything else.
Is his enclosure somewhere private, or in the lounge with lots of people walking past etc? (that can stress them out)

I'd also put a hide in his cool end.

Here's a great diamond python care sheet

 

Reptilechick

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Hey Dave,

In Victoria, glass enclosures are not the best for retaining heat, so while you may be getting readings of this temp or that, the ambient temp may be too cool for your little mate to eat, particularly considering we have just experienced such weird weather with all the rain.

My first suggestion would be to insulate the glass to hold the heat in more and try and get your cool side down to around 24, diamonds are slightly different to other pythons and like slightly cooler temps.

Don't stress, you will work it put and your mate is more capable of handling stress than we are.
 

Essjaya

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glass enclosures are not the best for retaining heat
Hi everybody,
As a bit of a wacky inventor, I'm wondering if cladding the glass with clear perspex sheets, with spacers in between both surfaces, sealed at the outside edges with silicone, would give the vivarium's ambient temperature greater sustainabilitly.
The air between the layers would prevent the heat simply wicking out through the perspex, in the way that double glazed windows work for human homes in cooler climates. The perspex not being as heavy or dangerous to handle, could be spaced away from the glass and adhered by thick or layered double sided tape. Sealing the edges of the gap between the sheets would prevent the possibility of dust or bugs getting in between the layers and keep the warm air from escaping. I would prepare the spacers ahead of time and apply a line of silicone along the bottom edge of each panel before applying it, sealing the top after completion.

A good quality tape (duct or gaffer) down each corner would hold the panels in place until the silicone dries, and could be left on if desired I suppose. Maybe not a one person job but I think doable.

I would of course double check my measurements before having the perspex cut.

The front piece should need to be cut longer than the glass (as well as a back piece if needed). The difference between the length of the glass and perspex would be the total of the thickness of the spacers and perspex on both ends.

Just an idea I thought I'd float.

I'd be happy to hear what you all reckon, as to the feasibility of my suggestion.

Cheers
 

Essjaya

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Hi everybody,
As a bit of a wacky inventor, I'm wondering if cladding the glass with clear perspex sheets, with spacers in between both surfaces, sealed at the outside edges with silicone, would give the vivarium's ambient temperature greater sustainabilitly.
The air between the layers would prevent the heat simply wicking out through the perspex, in the way that double glazed windows work for human homes in cooler climates. The perspex not being as heavy or dangerous to handle, could be spaced away from the glass and adhered by thick or layered double sided tape. Sealing the edges of the gap between the sheets would prevent the possibility of dust or bugs getting in between the layers and keep the warm air from escaping. I would prepare the spacers ahead of time and apply a line of silicone along the bottom edge of each panel before applying it, sealing the top after completion.

A good quality tape (duct or gaffer) down each corner would hold the panels in place until the silicone dries, and could be left on if desired I suppose. Maybe not a one person job but I think doable.

I would of course double check my measurements before having the perspex cut.

The front piece should need to be cut longer than the glass (as well as a back piece if needed). The difference between the length of the glass and perspex would be the total of the thickness of the spacers and perspex on both ends.

Just an idea I thought I'd float.

I'd be happy to hear what you all reckon, as to the feasibility of my suggestion.

Cheers
Yeah this morning I realised
Hi everybody,
As a bit of a wacky inventor, I'm wondering if cladding the glass with clear perspex sheets, with spacers in between both surfaces, sealed at the outside edges with silicone, would give the vivarium's ambient temperature greater sustainabilitly.
The air between the layers would prevent the heat simply wicking out through the perspex, in the way that double glazed windows work for human homes in cooler climates. The perspex not being as heavy or dangerous to handle, could be spaced away from the glass and adhered by thick or layered double sided tape. Sealing the edges of the gap between the sheets would prevent the possibility of dust or bugs getting in between the layers and keep the warm air from escaping. I would prepare the spacers ahead of time and apply a line of silicone along the bottom edge of each panel before applying it, sealing the top after completion.

A good quality tape (duct or gaffer) down each corner would hold the panels in place until the silicone dries, and could be left on if desired I suppose. Maybe not a one person job but I think doable.

I would of course double check my measurements before having the perspex cut.

The front piece should need to be cut longer than the glass (as well as a back piece if needed). The difference between the length of the glass and perspex would be the total of the thickness of the spacers and perspex on both ends.

Just an idea I thought I'd float.

I'd be happy to hear what you all reckon, as to the feasibility of my

This morning I realised I forgot to mention that it would only work with hinged doors or top access enclosure. For the sliding doors I reckon I would apply car window tinting to the front of the doors.

Sorry for any confusion. We are always bouncing our ideas around the house. Three of us are on the spectrum and we are always trying to figure out how any job or thing could be done. I think if we built every concept we would need to live in a warehouse. Rofl
 

Snapped

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This morning I realised I forgot to mention that it would only work with hinged doors or top access enclosure. For the sliding doors I reckon I would apply car window tinting to the front of the doors.

Sorry for any confusion. We are always bouncing our ideas around the house. Three of us are on the spectrum and we are always trying to figure out how any job or thing could be done. I think if we built every concept we would need to live in a warehouse. Rofl
While it's a good idea in theory, I think the cost would be prohibitive. Perspex is a bit too expensive to do all that.
Ideally, sell the glass enclosure and get something like a melamine one, or make your own, convert a cabinet etc. But for some that isn't possible in the meantime, so styrofoam is a good insulator (it's not pretty, but it does the job) :)
 

punkinhead

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Yeah this morning I realised


This morning I realised I forgot to mention that it would only work with hinged doors or top access enclosure. For the sliding doors I reckon I would apply car window tinting to the front of the doors.

Sorry for any confusion. We are always bouncing our ideas around the house. Three of us are on the spectrum and we are always trying to figure out how any job or thing could be done. I think if we built every concept we would need to live in a warehouse. Rofl
I like living in a warehouse.
 

GBWhite

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I Recently bought home my first snake a juvenile diamond python about 8-10 months old and have had him reasonably undisturbed in his enclosure for about a week my temps sit between 31 degrees on the hot side and 27 on the cool side my issue is he hasnt been fed for about two weeks and i am having the issue of him wanting too eat (i imagen due to stress) I mistakenly handled him the second day i had him home but have since then realised that i shouldnt be (until fully settled) and have stopped handling and left him be. tried feeding him today but with no success

My enclosure is a 22 litre reptile one hatchling terrarium with 12w heat mat set to 30 degrees on a thermostat 24/7 i have a small reptile hide that he seems to spend most of his time in i do all my temp reading with a infrared thermometer and from the information i have gathered seem to be good and have the enclosure properly set up (still unsure due to be new to this)

My issue and concern is that he isnt eating and hasnt been fed for two weeks above that i dont want to stress the poor thing out and am curious as to whether he needs more time to settle or if i am doing something wrong with my husbandry (ive been finding it very difficult to find sufficient information on the subject of diamond pythons and there care)

Any information will be greatly appreciated thankyou



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Hi Dave,

Mate you snake looks fine. These guys can go for a month or two without a feed so don't stress just yet.

Leave it alone for a week or two and try again. As long as all the requirements regarding thermoregulation and husbandry are met it will eat when it's ready.

As stated glass enclosures aren't the best option for keeping snakes in but you can address that if and when the need arises. For now just be patient and see how things go.

Cheers,

George.
 
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