Narrowing things down.

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Primo

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This ultimately comes down to a personal decision, but I'm looking for experiences with these 2 species.

Coastal carpets from the south. Brisbane locality animals, preferably the type that gets the largest, and Morelia Bredli.

I'm specifically looking to find which species IN GENERAL, is the most arboreal, the most active and which tends to be the best eater. I'm looking to acquire the larger of the two sexes. I understand in the wild, male coastals will often be the larger of the two sexes due to combat. In captivity, I've read that is not necessarily the case.

I have considered reticulated python dwarfs, and even scrubs, but I think both of those choices are more work than I care deal with.

I love boa constrictors and have considered a Surinam locality boa, but carpets seem to be more active from my own experience with boas and carpets. However my boa is 100% the better eater.

I'd like to have an 8-11 foot animal that is somewhat handleable, fairly heavy bodied, relatively active and fairly arboreal but not totally.

Again this is narrowed down to the above two choices and I'm looking to zero in further based on some of the experiences you folks may have.

I fully understand that things will differ from animal to animal, and personal choice is obviously part of it.

IMO both options have great potential, but I'm only possibly able to snatch up one.

Of the two mentioned, who's experienced both and what are your thoughts?

Thanks for any and all input.

I have a coastal mutt that is 3+ years old. She is a terrible eater and seems to be stuck at the 6.5 foot range. She is healthy, active and really nice which is why I love carpets. I just want a bigger, better eater to add to the mix.

Thanks for the info! 8)
 

Herpo

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Hey Primo,

So from what you've said, I'd say a coastal may be a better option in terms of what you seem to prefer in a carpet, but I'll explain what I can.

For starters, Coastals tend to be a bit bigger than Bredli. A fully grown coastal can max out to around 4m, although generally stay a bit smaller. Bredli, on the other hand, tend to max out at 3m, although I understand this is quite rare. An individual on display at what used to be a local pet store was around that mark. Bredli however, are in most cases the more heavy bodied of the two, but not by too much.

Both generally feed without fault, but off course, this is dependant on the individual and things like climate and how much they tolerate disturbances, which play a huge part in feeding consistency.

Now in terms of which is more arboreal, I'd be leaning more towards coastals. They generally tend to live in heavily wooded areas, and have been seen feeding on possums in the trees before. They would probably fit more into the category of semi-arboreal. Bredli tend to be more ground dwelling snakes, as they inhabit mostly arid areas over here in Australia. However, given perches and enough places to climb, they to can take advantage of it. If you are asking which is more naturally arboreal, I'd say coastal carpets.

One thing I have noticed in Popeye, however, is that he has only recently become more arboreal. In the past, he'd stick to curling up on the ground, however, ever since he hit the one year mark, he's been spending more and more time on the bamboo perch we gave him. I guess as they get bigger and can take larger meals, they climb up into trees to find them.

Hope this helps, and if I've missed anything, don't hesitate to tell me,
Herpo
 

Primo

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Funny how things change.

After much deliberation, I decided to purchase an animal from yet another part of the world.

Sorry Aussie python lovers, (I'm one of them too) I opted for a Super Dwarf x Dwarf, tiger reticulated python.

I'm looking at a 7-10 foot, semi arboreal, highly active python.

Still love all my other snakes too!
 

Herpo

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Still very cool, any chance of pics of it? I love anacondas and retics, their amazing animals.
 

Primo

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Too late boss. I'm already committed and rather pleased with the decision.

Bredli are very, very nice, but my wife barley let this last one fly so I'm saying I'm "tapped out".

On an activity level, retics are one of the most active pythons around and they do climb and perch. Even the big ones.

My male should stay around the 9-10 foot mark with the percentages of dwarf and super dwarf blood in his genetics.

Herpo, sorry I don't have a picture just yet.

I'm still trying to figure out a good delivery date as well.

I'll post up when I can.

And just to keep my love for Aussie pythons in this thread, I'll add that my stubborn, feeding coastal took 2 large rats after nearly 2 months of refusals. Prior to that it was another 2 months. I think she likes to eat,,,,,,,,,,, about every 2 months.
 

Wokka

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I am no expert on genetics but would have thought that once you start crossing different lines of snakes the heritable traits become difficult to predict. Dwarf and super dwarf sound like marketing tools rather than genetic predictors. How do you tel whether they are dwarf or super dwarf?
 

Primo

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I am no expert on genetics but would have thought that once you start crossing different lines of snakes the heritable traits become difficult to predict. Dwarf and super dwarf sound like marketing tools rather than genetic predictors. How do you tel whether they are dwarf or super dwarf?

They are marketing tools to an extent. In reality the terms relate to certain island populations and evolutionary adaptations that the localities from those smaller islands posses. Much the same as the Central American boa constrictors VS their mainland cousins. Island forms often rely on migration and seasonality when it comes to feeding and usually remain smaller because of that.


There is is some genetic mixing in my animal as the parents are not from the same locality and there is about 19% mainland in the makeup. The parents are not larger than 14' however. The particular breeder of this snake is very reputable and trusted in the retic community. I was told to expect fully mature adult size in the 7-9 foot range. I am prepared for 10-11.

I suppose there is potential for a larger specimen, but feeding and husbandry also play a role. We shall see.

I have a plan in place if perhaps I was misguided.

- - - Updated - - -

Hey Herpo,

Because you asked, I finally have a photo.

I expect delivery in the next 3 weeks.

IMG_3537.jpg


Male SD/Dwarf Tiger 100% Het Snow (Purple Albino & Anery) Retic.

Mum is 10' and fully grown. Pops is 5' and fully grown.

I still want a Bredli but my wife has about had it with my antics LOL.

I'm just going to thank her, as she deserves it, and be happy with my collection of 4.
 
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