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Emma French

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Hello! I’m looking to own a Darwin python (I have found my breeder) and I just want to get some suggestions for best substrates and best heat lamp/mat arrangements. I have read up a lot about each subject but I’m just not too sure what to do. I’m not too sure on what light set up to have. I’ve read so many different things, have a uvb light and a red and a blue heat night light, just have a ceramic heat lamp: I just want to figure it all out in the next couple weeks before I pick up my python
 

Herpetology

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You don’t need; uv light, red light, or blue light, waste of money when it comes to keeping pythons

Rest is entirely up to you, I personally run a 50w heat cord sandwiched between the bottom of tank and a 1cm thick wooden square controlled at 34°c via thermostat

And newspaper substrate or cocopeat completely dried out
 

Yellowtail

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You don't need any light other than if you want it for your benefit to see inside the cage, if the Darwin is albino bright light will be very distressing for it and UV will probably result in skin cancers.
You don't say how old the python is and the requirements for a hatchling are quite different than for a mature animal but you need a heat source, ceramic or other set up so you have a temperature gradient of approx 33c to 25c with a perch set up so the python can select it's preferred temperature location. Personally with mature semi-arboreal species like Darwins I prefer an overhead ceramic or radiator source but a hatchling is best kept in a tub with a heat cable or matt providing the same gradient. The breeder should be able to advise with cage setup.
 

Sdaji

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You'll get different answers from different people, but don't be too confused; most of it will work and there are just different options. I personally think ceramics are garbage which have alternatives which are superior in every way, but others like them for some reason... probably because of commercial influence. I'd personally just use floor heat (personally I go for heat cords but for people only keeping small numbers of snakes mats can be more convenient). By putting the floor heat under only part of the enclosure it's very easy to provide a thermal gradient. The exact temperatures aren't too important but a cool end from the low to mid 20s to a hot end of low to mid 30s will be fine.

As others said, don't worry about lighting unless you want soft lighting for your own viewing pleasure.

Darwins aren't really basking reptiles so I wouldn't use a heat lamp. They're nocturnal, naturally active in the evening when the ground is warm, so floor heat is best for them. If you're in a cold climate you might want something to keep the air warmer. Being in a fairly warm herp room is plenty, but if you only have one snake and it's in a cold room you may want to look at heat panels (my personal option would be a home made heat panel made from a heat cord). Years ago I'd have used blue globes and these still work, but are now basically obsolete.

Substrate is a matter of personal preference. I use paper towel for hatchlings and most people prefer some sort of paper such as newspaper. For adults there are countless options. Newspaper or Breeders Choice work well, there are some more expensive commercial options if you like splashing more money around gratuitously. Avoid sand, and I'd personally avoid cocopeat as it's messy and while it's probably harmless the snake will end up eating it when it gets stuck to their feed.

Good luck and keep us all posted! :)
 

Emma French

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You don’t need; uv light, red light, or blue light, waste of money when it comes to keeping pythons

Rest is entirely up to you, I personally run a 50w heat cord sandwiched between the bottom of tank and a 1cm thick wooden square controlled at 34°c via thermostat

And newspaper substrate or cocopeat completely dried out
Thank you!!
[doublepost=1573119546,1573119507][/doublepost]
You don't need any light other than if you want it for your benefit to see inside the cage, if the Darwin is albino bright light will be very distressing for it and UV will probably result in skin cancers.
You don't say how old the python is and the requirements for a hatchling are quite different than for a mature animal but you need a heat source, ceramic or other set up so you have a temperature gradient of approx 33c to 25c with a perch set up so the python can select it's preferred temperature location. Personally with mature semi-arboreal species like Darwins I prefer an overhead ceramic or radiator source but a hatchling is best kept in a tub with a heat cable or matt providing the same gradient. The breeder should be able to advise with cage setup.
Thank you! I appreciate it!!
[doublepost=1573119593][/doublepost]
You'll get different answers from different people, but don't be too confused; most of it will work and there are just different options. I personally think ceramics are garbage which have alternatives which are superior in every way, but others like them for some reason... probably because of commercial influence. I'd personally just use floor heat (personally I go for heat cords but for people only keeping small numbers of snakes mats can be more convenient). By putting the floor heat under only part of the enclosure it's very easy to provide a thermal gradient. The exact temperatures aren't too important but a cool end from the low to mid 20s to a hot end of low to mid 30s will be fine.

As others said, don't worry about lighting unless you want soft lighting for your own viewing pleasure.

Darwins aren't really basking reptiles so I wouldn't use a heat lamp. They're nocturnal, naturally active in the evening when the ground is warm, so floor heat is best for them. If you're in a cold climate you might want something to keep the air warmer. Being in a fairly warm herp room is plenty, but if you only have one snake and it's in a cold room you may want to look at heat panels (my personal option would be a home made heat panel made from a heat cord). Years ago I'd have used blue globes and these still work, but are now basically obsolete.

Substrate is a matter of personal preference. I use paper towel for hatchlings and most people prefer some sort of paper such as newspaper. For adults there are countless options. Newspaper or Breeders Choice work well, there are some more expensive commercial options if you like splashing more money around gratuitously. Avoid sand, and I'd personally avoid cocopeat as it's messy and while it's probably harmless the snake will end up eating it when it gets stuck to their feed.

Good luck and keep us all posted! :)
Thank you so much! I really appreciate it! Really helped me clear some things up!
 
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