Queensland girl wakes up to snake disappearing under her bed

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cagey

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Although at 1.5m it is hardly huge.


A young Queensland girl experienced a horrifying late-night wake up call after a 1.5 metre python made its way into her bedroom as she slept.
Sunshine Coast Snake Catcher 24/7 owner Stuart McKenzie received a call just after 1am on Thursday from a family in Buderim begging him to come and catch the snake that had made its way into their home.

“The young girl has woken up to a 1.5 metre snake slithering in her room and going under her bed,” Mr McKenzie said in a video posted to his Facebook page.

“I guess that’s what nightmares are made of.”

The python made its way into the home through the dog door. Picture: Sunshine Coast Snake Catchers 24/7/Facebook

The python made its way into the home through the dog door. Picture: Sunshine Coast Snake Catchers 24/7/Facebook
The snake had made itself at home under the girl’s bed. Picture: Sunshine Coast Snake Catchers 24/7/Facebook

The snake had made itself at home under the girl’s bed. Picture: Sunshine Coast Snake Catchers 24/7/Facebook
They established the python must have gotten into the home through the doggie door, knocking a few items off a nearby shelf in the process.

Mr McKenzie enters the girl’s bedroom and shines a light under the bed, revealing the huge snake curled up in one of the far corners.

They took the girl’s mattress off the bed and the snake catcher attempted to grab the snake through the bed slats.

But Mr McKenzie quickly realised the python wasn’t going to come out easily, with the family having to take the bed apart to allow for better access.

Mr McKenzie then pull the snake out, showing the family the huge python before safely putting it away in his bag to be relocated.

FROM NEWS.COM.AU

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“Not a lot of sleep for us snake catchers but its all part of the job,” Mr McKenzie said.

“Snakes are still on the move in this wet weather so keep an eye out and give us a call anytime.”

The snake catcher got the call just after 1am to come and retrieve the python. Picture: Sunshine Coast Snake Catchers 24/7/Facebook

The snake catcher got the call just after 1am to come and retrieve the python. Picture: Sunshine Coast Snake Catchers 24/7/Facebook
The python was safely taken away to be relocated. Picture: Sunshine Coast Snake Catchers 24/7/Facebook

The python was safely taken away to be relocated. Picture: Sunshine Coast Snake Catchers 24/7/Facebook
In September, the Australian Reptile Park issued the warning for residents to be on high alert for snakes, saying there had been an increase in the number of sightings.

About 3000 Australians will be bitten by a snake each year, with about 300 of those needing antivenom – a medicine given to treat snake bites.

Reptile keeper Jake Meney is urging Australians to brush up on their snake bite first aid skills.

“Snake bites mostly occur when people are trying to catch or kill the snake, so if you don’t do either of those things you should be OK,” he said.

“However, it is important to know the correct first aid technique so if the worst-case scenario occurs you are prepared.”

He said if a person was bitten by a snake they should remain calm, remove all jewellery and apply pressure to the bite site before bandaging the entire limb.

“By applying the pressure-immobilisation bandage, venom cannot easily spread through the body, slowing down the envenomation process by giving more time for the bite victim to seek antivenom at hospital” Mr Meney said, noting that a person should call an ambulance or immediately seek hospital care.

Experts say the warmer weather could also encourage snakes to venture in backyards. Mowing the lawn regularly and removing piles of wood or leaves could help deter them.
 

-Adam-

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I love when story's like this get hyped up when it's legit just a carpet lol, no hate just, it's a non-venomous snake.

And hardly "huge" at 1.5m either. As Mark Twain once said "If you don't read the news, you're not informed. If you do read the news, you're misinformed".

Someone needs to introduce that reporter to Dundee. "That's not a huge snake.... THIS is a huge snake". 😆
 

-Adam-

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most people would have no idea whether it's venomous or not, it's a SNAKE, let's freak the F out. We're all gonna die
Bang on DL! Most people would not., and that's understandable. Especially for the family involved. Imagine as a young person waking up, drowsy in the middle of the night, to a snake -where they may not have had the opportunity to even get a good look - probably in poor lighting, maybe even coming out of a dream state - even though I know it's a python - in those circumstances I probably wouldn't have a clue what it was to start with and would be pretty frightening myself.

But then - conversely - the media, with photo's, time available to research, from the safety of their office/computer, and most likely access to the snake catcher. Well - they have all the time to get it right, and then report correct and truthfully on the matter. The family - completely understandable. The media has no excuse, and I have nothing but contempt for.

This is something to ponder: if this is how the media writes articles on matters that we actually know about - then is it possible that they use the same techniques for all other things that they also write articles on where we don't have a good understanding?
 

Yeliena

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Imagine it from the poor snake's POV...
"Young snake finds a nice quiet dark place to sleep then, to his horror, is attacked by giants. Some are screaming, others trying to trap him. "I nearly pooped myself in fright" he said afterwards...." 🤪🤪
 

dragonlover1

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But then - conversely - the media, with photo's, time available to research, from the safety of their office/computer, and most likely access to the snake catcher. Well - they have all the time to get it right, and then report correct and truthfully on the matter. The family - completely understandable. The media has no excuse, and I have nothing but contempt for.

This is something to ponder: if this is how the media writes articles on matters that we actually know about - then is it possible that they use the same techniques for all other things that they also write articles on where we don't have a good understanding?
Yes they do, journalists are paid to sensationalize any boring stuff. Imagine if the report said " girl finds small python in her room" , it wouldn't even get mentioned. Most plebs would have a vague idea that a python is not deadly, but call it a large SNAKE and everybody tunes in.
They did the same thing a couple of years ago, some guy took his Antaresia for a ride on a train and they blew it up to a dangerous snake terrorizing passengers
 

Wolfgang5

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Huge at 1 5m? Hmm ok, at least they're not doing the usual, "12m long python" found sizing up sleeping young child. Or huge 50m long diamond python in supermarket shelves.

To the everyday person, 1.5m snake is huge, to those of us who companion these guys, 1.5m is a hatchy. Lol
 

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