Show us Your Ants! The Antaresia Appreciation Thread!

Subzero2888

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My little guy/girl "fluffy" (kids named it)
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Barry

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5EB94771-C44D-4F19-9A93-FD00E72EBC03.jpeg Who ever said Children’s pythons weren’t arboreal? My girl climbs everything, cut up an old take handle & screwed it in place an hour ago, went for lunch to find this when I got back

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Kaisolas

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My gorgeous Lucifer who we lost just today
Most of my photos of him are with him snuggled in my chest... close to my heart, always.
 

Kaisolas

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How’d u lose him?
The vet couldn’t give me an answer without an autopsy but said that as he was only about 10 months old he is still susceptible to disease or bacteria. We have had him over 6 months so it was really sudden... no warning... no symptoms... heartbreaking
 

Sdaji

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The vet couldn’t give me an answer without an autopsy but said that as he was only about 10 months old he is still susceptible to disease or bacteria. We have had him over 6 months so it was really sudden... no warning... no symptoms... heartbreaking

This definitely wasn't a virus or bacterium. It's really sad that vets are charging money when they are either this incompetent or this dishonest. Reptiles have very slow metabolisms, so pathogens take much longer to develop than in other animals like humans. But, even in humans, you never get killed by bacteria or viruses by being totally fine then suddenly dropping dead. You always spend at least a short time getting sick first, and generally a long time (very few pathogens take less than a week to kill a mammal, humans being an example of a mammal). The fastest acting pathogens to kill mammals are things like meningococcal, which leaves very obvious signs. It's also just silly to say a pathogen is likely because he was only about 10 months old. Unless there's an obvious cause like poisoning or exposure to extreme temperature etc, sudden death at that age is generally a congenital issue revealing itself.
 

Kaisolas

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This definitely wasn't a virus or bacterium. It's really sad that vets are charging money when they are either this incompetent or this dishonest. Reptiles have very slow metabolisms, so pathogens take much longer to develop than in other animals like humans. But, even in humans, you never get killed by bacteria or viruses by being totally fine then suddenly dropping dead. You always spend at least a short time getting sick first, and generally a long time (very few pathogens take less than a week to kill a mammal, humans being an example of a mammal). The fastest acting pathogens to kill mammals are things like meningococcal, which leaves very obvious signs. It's also just silly to say a pathogen is likely because he was only about 10 months old. Unless there's an obvious cause like poisoning or exposure to extreme temperature etc, sudden death at that age is generally a congenital issue revealing itself.
Actually she didn’t charge me, which was appreciated. His colour was all normal except for a greenish tinge near where his food was sitting about nearly halfway down his body... he was last fed about 2 weeks ago... thinking about it, his food wasn’t digested as fast from this feed as previous feeds... I didn’t take any photos as I was/am so distraught from his passing...
I miss him so much... am used to having a cuddle every morning and I went to his viv this morning again out of habit... I am blaming myself because he was my first snake and I just don’t know if I should get another...
 

Sdaji

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Actually she didn’t charge me, which was appreciated. His colour was all normal except for a greenish tinge near where his food was sitting about nearly halfway down his body... he was last fed about 2 weeks ago... thinking about it, his food wasn’t digested as fast from this feed as previous feeds... I didn’t take any photos as I was/am so distraught from his passing...
I miss him so much... am used to having a cuddle every morning and I went to his viv this morning again out of habit... I am blaming myself because he was my first snake and I just don’t know if I should get another...

Pretty cool she didn't charge you, that's one good thing and shows that at least she's probably not dishonest.

That greenish tinge is pretty common to see in snakes after they die, regardless of what the cause is. I've seen that in multiple collections in snakes which have died from a range of things, known and unknown.

No reason to blame yourself. The reality is that if you work with animals, eventually you're going to have dead animals. If you did nothing wrong there's no reason to feel bad, guilty or responsible. Presumably you went through all the obvious possibilities with your vet (the snake wasn't given an extreme chill or heat exposure, nothing significantly bad happened, no physical injuries, etc) so it was most likely a congenital issue, and there's nothing anyone could have done about that. Give the best keeper in the world 100 hatchling snakes and it's almost certain that he won't be capable of giving you 100 adult snakes. It's just very unlucky that it happened to your first snake. Very sorry to hear this story.
 

Kaisolas

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Pretty cool she didn't charge you, that's one good thing and shows that at least she's probably not dishonest.

That greenish tinge is pretty common to see in snakes after they die, regardless of what the cause is. I've seen that in multiple collections in snakes which have died from a range of things, known and unknown.

No reason to blame yourself. The reality is that if you work with animals, eventually you're going to have dead animals. If you did nothing wrong there's no reason to feel bad, guilty or responsible. Presumably you went through all the obvious possibilities with your vet (the snake wasn't given an extreme chill or heat exposure, nothing significantly bad happened, no physical injuries, etc) so it was most likely a congenital issue, and there's nothing anyone could have done about that. Give the best keeper in the world 100 hatchling snakes and it's almost certain that he won't be capable of giving you 100 adult snakes. It's just very unlucky that it happened to your first snake. Very sorry to hear this story.
Thank you. It makes me feel a little better having an experienced snake person say that.
 
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