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alexandra_mohr

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Hello,
I'm new here and I hop you can help me.
I live in Germany and I visited Australia for taking pictures of reptiles and amphibians.
Now I am identifying my photos to write a trip report and I don't know every Australian animal ;-)
So my first question: is this a Wollumbinia latisternum? It is at Atherton Tablelands.
PC254836---Kopie.jpg

Thanks,
Alex
 
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Bushman

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I notice that you haven't included the generic name Scott. Why is that?
I'm guessing that you're undecided as to which generic name to ascribe.

I grew up with Elseya latisternum, then they were taken out of the snapping turtle genus (Elseya) and became known as Wollumbinia latisternum but more recently Georges and Thomson have proposed Myuchelys latisternum.
What are your thoughts on the taxonomy of this species?
 

eipper

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Definately Wollumbinia....Myuchelys is unavailable under the ICZN code. It all comes down to whether or not the name proposed by Richard is actually published (was it a publication as specified by the ICZN at the time). If not then Myuchelys is good....if it was well Wollumbinia is correct. My opinion is that it was published in accordance will the code and therefore valid.....however I do wonder if this will remain the case. I think this is one that might need to go before the ICZN for a ruling.

Give me a call on 0419 328 251 if you like, there is a fairly big move that might throw up some significant problems that i am not going to type out because its fairly large.

Cheers,
Scott
 

Bushman

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Thanks for elaborating on that Scott. I'm looking at the southern members of genus, which are reportedly in decline. Decreasing recruitment seems to be occurring much like Elusor and Rheodytes. [FONT=&amp]
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So Wollumbinia latisternum it is then, until further notice.
 
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eipper

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then again though..they are dorsii not latisternum
 

Bushman

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Your pic didn't work Alexandra.

For those wondering how the Atherton Tablelands specimen was identified as Wollumbinia latisternum, there are serrations on the rear marginals of the carapace. Other identifying features are spinose tubercles on the neck and low tubercles on the temporal region. Also the horny shield on top of the head (helmet) extends down to the tympanum.
 
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