What snake do you think has the most personality

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BrettJ

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I have an Olive Python whom I think has a lot of personality. Very curious snake. Inspects everything i do in enclosure from filling water bowl to spot cleaning. He has a kink in the spine so he looks a bit odd and although it is there he has normal movement.
If I enter my reptile room he will often just stick his head out from where ever he is and seems to watch me cleaning other enclosures in the old rope scope position.
This boy gives me so much entertainment especially at feeding times. Strikes and wraps at a phenomenal speed then he cannot find the pointy end of any prey for extended periods.
I will then often carefully present the head and he will calmly start the ingestion just like when i hand feed my dog.. At the same time i am weary of him because getting bitten by him would be quite the painful experience he has a few particularly large teeth !
 

Sdaji

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Coastal Taipans win hands down among Australian snakes, although few will ever keep them.

Among Pythons (the only snakes which will ever be largely popular in Australia), it's a real case of apples and oranges, but Waters, Olives and Scrubbies rank high, Antaresia are very underrated, Womas and Black-headeds are utter morons but have crazy attitudes which make them comical in a way you could sort of call personality, and at the shallow end of the personality pool there are Carpets, but people love them so will project personality on to them and believe they're full of it, regardless of how lacking they are.

The majority of keepers actually like snakes with as little personality as popular, highlighted by the world's most popular snake (the Ball Python) having an utterly dismal personality, hence the memes mocking Ball Python keepers. Working with Ball Pythons (in Asia and the USA) has been among my most horrible experiences while abroad.
 

Telluric

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Coastal Taipans win hands down among Australian snakes, although few will ever keep them.

Among Pythons (the only snakes which will ever be largely popular in Australia), it's a real case of apples and oranges, but Waters, Olives and Scrubbies rank high, Antaresia are very underrated, Womas and Black-headeds are utter morons but have crazy attitudes which make them comical in a way you could sort of call personality, and at the shallow end of the personality pool there are Carpets, but people love them so will project personality on to them and believe they're full of it, regardless of how lacking they are.

The majority of keepers actually like snakes with as little personality as popular, highlighted by the world's most popular snake (the Ball Python) having an utterly dismal personality, hence the memes mocking Ball Python keepers. Working with Ball Pythons (in Asia and the USA) has been among my most horrible experiences while abroad.
I totally agree with Sdaji - I have a 2 year old Woma who just has endless curiosity, a big desire to explore and totally unjustified confidence, which I suspect is due to her um, being a bit of a moron as you put it hahah. This often ends up with her in comical places and situation. She comes out to free roam the house almost every day for a couple of hours, and she always watches when you're doing something. She also frequently knocks things over, climbs surfaces that can't actually support her weight and has even learned recently that if she tries hard enough, she can climb onto the kitchen bench. Very big 'personality'.

My 1 year old Darwin Carpet Python on the other hand, is very happy to sit in his hide or under his basking lamp for the entire day. If I didn't take him out for exercise, he'd be happy doing very little at all!

I brought home my first Antaresia hatchling one week ago, and I can already tell by the way he's scooting curiously around his click clack tub that he's going to be spicy - as a breeder of these little guys, what quirks do you enjoy about them? Are they are curious and active (and as bad at climbing) as womas? I can find plenty of research online about husbandry, feeding, growth etc, but it's much harder to find objective information on snake personalities. ;)
 

Sdaji

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I totally agree with Sdaji - I have a 2 year old Woma who just has endless curiosity, a big desire to explore and totally unjustified confidence, which I suspect is due to her um, being a bit of a moron as you put it hahah. This often ends up with her in comical places and situation. She comes out to free roam the house almost every day for a couple of hours, and she always watches when you're doing something. She also frequently knocks things over, climbs surfaces that can't actually support her weight and has even learned recently that if she tries hard enough, she can climb onto the kitchen bench. Very big 'personality'.

My 1 year old Darwin Carpet Python on the other hand, is very happy to sit in his hide or under his basking lamp for the entire day. If I didn't take him out for exercise, he'd be happy doing very little at all!

I brought home my first Antaresia hatchling one week ago, and I can already tell by the way he's scooting curiously around his click clack tub that he's going to be spicy - as a breeder of these little guys, what quirks do you enjoy about them? Are they are curious and active (and as bad at climbing) as womas? I can find plenty of research online about husbandry, feeding, growth etc, but it's much harder to find objective information on snake personalities. ;)
You're unlikely to ever find objective information about snake characters. It's 90% people who have one or two snakes and raving about whatever species they happen to have being the best in the world, 9% anthropomorphosisms where people vividly imagine the snake is doing and thinking things it never could or would, and 1% everything else.

Individual Antaresia may have their quirks but overall I'd just say they have very raw python characters, a sort of pythonic enthusiasm sort of similar to what you'll find in things like Retics, but especially impressive because it's packed into a small package. Antaresia are better climbers than Aspidites, but even more arboreal pythons like Carpets are prone to falling clumsily while climbing. But then again, Australian pythons don't get more dull than Carpets (even if Aspidites are more stupid!).

After working with Ball Pythons abroad, which are surely the worst characters among the world's pythons, I sort of don't mind Carpets and will be happy if I never again have the misfortune of having to deal with a Ball.
 

Flaviemys purvisi

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If we're talking purely Australian snakes I'd have to go with scrub pyrhons.... most personality of ANY snakes worldwide.... cobras.
 

princessparrot

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I don't have much experiences with snakes - but my prediction is that a lot of the responses you are going to get are going to be for one of the Aspidites. (Black Head Pythons and Woma's). ;-)
Definitely onto something there!

Woma‘s would have to be my absolute favourite overall character and temperament wise(especially if you’re looking into the smaller snakes) with the black-heads coming close behind.

olives would probably be the third if you don’t mind a larger snake
 

Maven8ter

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I totally agree with Sdaji - I have a 2 year old Woma who just has endless curiosity, a big desire to explore and totally unjustified confidence, which I suspect is due to her um, being a bit of a moron as you put it hahah. This often ends up with her in comical places and situation. She comes out to free roam the house almost every day for a couple of hours, and she always watches when you're doing something. She also frequently knocks things over, climbs surfaces that can't actually support her weight and has even learned recently that if she tries hard enough, she can climb onto the kitchen bench. Very big 'personality'.

My 1 year old Darwin Carpet Python on the other hand, is very happy to sit in his hide or under his basking lamp for the entire day. If I didn't take him out for exercise, he'd be happy doing very little at all!

I brought home my first Antaresia hatchling one week ago, and I can already tell by the way he's scooting curiously around his click clack tub that he's going to be spicy - as a breeder of these little guys, what quirks do you enjoy about them? Are they are curious and active (and as bad at climbing) as womas? I can find plenty of research online about husbandry, feeding, growth etc, but it's much harder to find objective information on snake personalities. ;)
my carpet has the same "personality" as your woma except add in the occasional nip from stopping her from exploring?
 

hrafna

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Good natured, easily handled, readily visible in the enclosure, I have found Murray darling carpets and rough scaled pythons to be great.
Unfortunately my bhp had never acted like a dumb ass.


But if you truly want a snake with unique personality, you can't go past a bandy bandy.
 

stylusmobilus

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This is gonna vary for everyone. For me it’s any of the Morelia species. They’re all twisted in the head, they do the funniest things and they have so much charm. I also find the defensive essing of eastern browns amusing too thought there’s nothing funny about being in the range of it.
 

ElapidHooks

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It depends on what you consider personality, is it the defensive behaviour, is it the calmness, is it the personality in captive individuals or wild individuals?

If you asked me i would go with common tree snake (dendrelaphis punctulatus) as I enjoy their attitude in the wild, they will always flare the neck and hiss wich i would consider personality.

As stylusmobilus said this will be different opinions for everyone.
 

eipper

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My coastal taipans are fairly well trained, my inlands bump into walls- they are relatively stupid. As for handling the most capable snake I have is an inland it is predictably nuts and being just over 7 ft is a heart racer. I have had worse Coastals though. As for pythons Scrubbies are most intelligent, olives seem to have some intelligence while the remaining are thick.
 

Pythonguy1

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olives seem to have some intelligence while the remaining are thick.
I worked with an olive which would slip out of his hide and stare at me then cock his head with his neck straight up whenever I unlocked his enclosure door.
 

subscore

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We have a coastal jungle shes amazing gives me kisses snuggles on the couch ect she leaves mum alone most the time to be on me lol love affair she says 🤣 but she never once bit not even from the egg
 

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